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first_img Australian Defence White Paper doesn’t go unnoticed View post tag: Royal Australian Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today Australian Defence White Paper doesn’t go unnoticed Authorities February 26, 2016 Australian Prime Minister and the Minister of Defence unveiled the long-awaited 2016 Australian Defence White Paper February 25.The plan is set to increase defence spending by AUS $29.9 billion (approx. US $21.5 billion) over the following ten years.A Defence Industry Policy Statement (DIPS) and a Defence Integrated Investment Program (IIP) were also released on the occasion.What will certainly make the Australian shipbuilders happy is the fact that navy is at the center of the defense paper as the country aims to double the submarine fleet to 12, add another three destroyers, 9 anti-submarine frigates and 12 new patrol boats.Controversy Long talks of the Australian submarine bid and the competitors for it coupled with the complicated political situation in the South China Sea made sure the document doesn’t go without controversy.The core reasoning behind this focus on the navy is China’s rising military might and the current diplomatic situation between China on one side and Australia, the U.S. and Japan on the other.The document stated: “Australia does not take sides on competing territorial claims in the South China Sea but we are concerned that land reclamation and construction activity by claimants raises tensions in the region. Australia opposes the use of artificial structures in the South China Sea for military purposes.”This bit got Chinese officials “seriously concerned” wrote the Associated Press, quoting the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying as saying: “China is seriously concerned about and dissatisfied with the White Paper’s negative statement on issues concerning the South China Sea and the development of China’s military strength.”The Chinese Defence Ministry spokesman Wu Qian said at a regular briefing: “We are firmly opposed to the accusations against China’s construction activities on the islands and reefs in the South China Sea. The islands and reefs in the South China Sea are inherent Chinese territory from ancient times. China’s construction activities on these islands and reefs are conducted on its own territory and within its sovereign rights.”The spokesman added that the South China Sea issue was not an issue between China and Australia, and that freedom of navigation was enjoyed by all countries including Australia.At home, both South Australia and West Australia are competing to get the most out of the proposed naval program. The Australian Defense Minister Marise Payne had to react to criticism from South Australia Defence Industries Minister Martin Hamilton-Smith who said the frigate contract which was under the White Paper awarded to South Australia would be cold comfort for the state if West Australia ends up building the patrol boats, AAP reported.What got the minister worried is the fact that the paper did not specify where exactly the patrol would be built. Share this articlelast_img read more


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first_imgAryzta, the Swiss frozen bakery giant, has seen revenue up 7% for Food Europe to £320.1m (€404.1m), in its first-quarter trading statement.The business, which owns brands such as Cuisine de France, said underlying revenue was up 3.1%, with a contribution of 2.7% from acquisitions, for the period ended 31 October 2014.It said the revenue growth had also been impacted by a transfer of production volumes from North America to Europe.Aryzta chief executive Owen Killian said: “We anticipate increased momentum in underlying revenue through H2.“Our focus is to deliver value for our customers, while unlocking the benefits of our newly created business platform.“With our increasing market relevance, we have confidence in our unchanged medium-term guidance of 7% to 12% growth in underlying, fully diluted EPS.”Overall, it said the trends in Europe remained positive, which reflected “improving stability” in Aryzta Food Solutions and strong growth within large retail.The trends in Food Rest of World were consistent with previous quarters, it added.last_img read more


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first_imgDundee-based family bakery Clark’s has revealed plans to invest in two new stores, bringing its total shop-count to ten.It is building a new site on Dundee’s Kingsway and has just had planning permission for its tenth shop, which will be in Fintry, Dundee.Clark’s also recently opened its eighth shop in Arbroath, Angus, in August.The 70-year-old third generation company has just been given planning permission for a £100,000 expansion of its bakery from the current 8,000 sq ft to 10,000 sq ft, to boost capacity.Owner Jonathon Clark said he had moved the company from being a traditional bakery to offering more food to go such as salads.All stores offer an electric vehicle local delivery service to reduce the carbon footprint and the environmental impact of deliveries.He commented: “It is exciting to propose investment in this area which will create new jobs during an uncertain time for many.”last_img read more


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first_imgMainers will head to the polls Tuesday, electing a new governor, filling a number of state and county positions and weighing in on five referendum questions. The questions are listed first, followed by candidates appearing on local ballots and poll places and times.Question 1: Universal Home Care ProgramQuestion 1 is a Citizen’s Initiative, meaning it was brought forward after a petition process collected enough signatures. The wording of Question 1, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you want to create the Universal Home Care Program to provide home-based assistance to people with disabilities and senior citizens, regardless of income, funded by a new 3.8% tax on individuals and families with Maine wage and adjusted gross income above the amount subject to Social Security taxes, which is $128,400 in 2018? If approved, Question 1 would create a Universal Home Care Program that would provide in-home and community support services for Mainers that require assistance due to either old age or disability.The program would be funded by new taxes on wage income and non-wage income that exceeds the amount of wages subject to Social Security taxes; in 2018 that figure was $128,400. Specifically, a 1.9 percent tax would be applied to both the employer and the employee on wage income in excess of $128,400. A 3.8 percent tax would also be applied to qualifying non-wage income, reduced by the amount paid in relation to wage income; by design this would cap the tax at 3.8 percent. That tax would generate $310 million annually, according to the state’s Office of Fiscal and Program Review.A nine-member board would be created to oversee the program. The law would require that at least 77 percent of the funding go directly to service worker costs.Question 2: Wastewater Infrastructure BondQuestion 2 is a bond issue, meaning it was passed by two-thirds of the Legislature prior to appearing on the warrant. The wording of Question 2, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you favor a $30,000,000 bond issue to improve water quality, support the planning and construction of wastewater treatment facilities and assist homeowners whose homes are served by substandard or malfunctioning wastewater treatment systems? This question would authorize the state to issue $30 million in bonds, mostly to support Department of Environmental Protection-issued grants to municipalities for pollution abatement facilities. A total of $27.65 million would be used for that purpose, prioritizing areas with high-value shellfish resources. Another $2 million would be used to replace failing septic systems through the Small Communities Grant Program and the final $350,000 would assist homeowners eliminating residential overboard discharge systems on the coast.Assuming 5 percent interest over 10 years, the $30 million bond would generate $8.25 million in interest.Question 3: Transportation BondQuestion 3 is a bond issue, meaning it was passed by two-thirds of the Legislature prior to appearing on the warrant. The wording of Question 3, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you favor a $106,000,000 bond issue, including $101,000,000 for construction, reconstruction and rehabilitation of highways and bridges and for facilities and equipment related to ports, piers, harbors, marine transportation, freight and passenger railroads, aviation, transit and bicycle and pedestrian trails, to be used to match an estimated $137,000,000 in federal and other funds, and $5,000,000 for the upgrade of municipal culverts at stream crossings? Question 3 authorizes the state to issue $106 million in bonds: $80 million to the Department of Transportation to support highway and bridge improvements; another $20 million to the MDOT for facilities and equipment relating to marine transportation, aviation, railroads, bicycles and pedestrian trails; $1 million to the Maine Maritime Academy to improve the waterfront pier in Castine; and $5 million to the Department of Environmental Protection to fund the installation of culverts at stream crossings to improve fish habitats.Assuming 5 percent interest over 10 years, the $106 million bond would generate $29.15 million in interest.Question 4: Public University BondQuestion 4 is a bond issue, meaning it was passed by two-thirds of the Legislature prior to appearing on the warrant. The wording of Question 4, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you favor a $49,000,000 bond issue to be matched by at least $49,000,000 in private and public funds to modernize and improve the facilities and infrastructure of Maine’s public universities in order to expand workforce development capacity and to attract and retain students to strengthen Maine’s economy and future workforce? This question would allow the state to issue $49 million in bonds for construction and renovation projects within the University of Maine System. The funds would be distributed at the direction of the Board of Trustees, with that board having approved projects in all seven campuses. At the University of Maine at Farmington campus, $8.5 million in Question 4 funds would be used to renovate the Olsen Student Center, Mantor Library and build a new Child Care & Early Education Center, as well as support improvements in the classrooms and dorms.Assuming 5 percent interest over 10 years, the $49 million bond would generate $13.47 million in interest.Question 5: Community College BondQuestion 5 is a bond issue, meaning it was passed by two-thirds of the Legislature prior to appearing on the warrant. The wording of Question 5, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you favor a $15,000,000 bond issue to improve educational programs by upgrading facilities at all 7 of Maine’s community colleges in order to provide Maine people with access to high-skill, low-cost technical and career education? Question 5 would allow the state to issue $15 million in bonds to support the Maine Community College System. The funds would go toward the seven colleges for a variety of purposes that range from creating new programs to energy efficiency improvements to facilities. At the Central Maine Community College in Auburn, $2.5 million would be used to renovate and expand instructional laboratories, upgrade information technology infrastructure and upgrade heating and ventilating systems.Assuming 5 percent interest over 10 years, the $15 million bond would generate $4.12 million in interest.The state-wide ballot (all towns in Franklin County vote on this)Gubernatorial ElectionAlan Caron of Freeport (Independent)Teresea Hayes of Buckfield (Independent)Janet Mills of Farmington (Democrat)Shawn Moody of Gorham (Republican)[Note: While appearing on the ballot, Caron has dropped out of the race, endorsing Mills]U.S. Senate ElectionEric Brakey of Auburn (Republican)Angus King of Brunswick (Independent) [Incumbent]Zak Ringelstein of Yarmouth (Democrat)U.S. Congressional District 2 ElectionTiffany Bond of Portland (Independent)Jared Golden of Lewiston (Democrat)William Hoar of Southwest Harbor (Independent)Bruce Poliquin of Oakland (Republican) [Incumbent]State Senate District 17Russell Black of Wilton (Republican)Jan Collins of Wilton (Democrat)State House of Representatives DistrictsHouse District 74 – Includes the towns of Jay, Livermore Falls and part of Livermore.Christina Riley of Jay (Democrat) [Incumbent]Robert Staples of Jay (Republican)House District 112 – Includes the towns of Anson, Avon, Carrabassett Valley, Carthage, Kingfield, New Portland, Phillips, Starks, Weld and Sandy River Plantation, plus the unorganized territories of East Central Franklin (including Freeman, Madrid and Salem Townships), and Perkins and Washington Townships.Thomas Skolfield of Weld (Republican) [Incumbent]Cynthia Soma-Hernandez of Anson (Democrat)House District 113 – Includes the towns of Farmington and New Sharon.Paul Brown of Farmington (Republican)Scott Landry of Farmington (Democrat)House District 114 – Includes the towns of Chesterville, Industry, New Vineyard, Strong, Temple and Wilton.Randall Hall of Wilton (Republican)Cherieann Harrison of Wilton (Democrat)Maitland Lord of Chesterville (Independent)House District 117 – Andover, Bethel, Byron, Eustis, Gilead, Greenwood, Hanover, Lovell (part), Newry, Rangeley, Stoneham, Stow, Upton and Plantations of Coplin, Dallas, Lincoln, Magalloway and Rangeley, plus the unorganized territories of North Franklin, North Oxford, South Oxford (including Albany and Mason Townships) and West Central Franklin.Frances Head of Bethel (Republican) [Incumbent]Stephanie LeBlanc of Bethel (Democrat)Judge of ProbateRonald Aseltine of Wilton (Independent)Margot Joly of Weld (Democrat)County TreasurerQuenten Clark of Farmington (Republican)Pamela Prodan of Wilton (Democrat) [Incumbent]Register of DeedsSusan Black of Wilton (Republican) [Incumbent]District Attorney for District 3 (includes Franklin County)S Thomas Carey of Auburn (Republican)Andrew Robinson of Farmington (Democrat) [Incumbent]County Commissioner for District 3 (includes Weld, Avon, Strong, New Vineyard, Industry and everything north of those five towns)Clyde Barker of Strong (Republican) [Incumbent]Polling locations and times [Note: All polls close at 8 p.m.]AVON – municipal building at 1116 Rangeley Road – opens at 8 a.m.CARRABASSETT VALLEY – town office at 1001 Carriage Road – opens at 8 a.mCARTHAGE – town office at 703A Carthage Road – opens at 8 a.m.CHESTERVILLE – town office at 409 Dutch Gap Road – opens at 8 a.m.COPLIN PLANTATION (& Wyman Twp) – town office at 8 School Street – opens at 10 a.m.DALLAS PLANTATION – townhouse at 436 Dallas Hill Road – opens at 10 a.m.EUSTIS – town office at 88 Main Street – opens at 8 a.m.FARMINGTON – community center at 127 Middle Street – opens at 8 a.m.INDUSTRY – town office at 1033 Industry Road – opens at 8 a.m.JAY – community building at 13 Community Drive – opens at 8 a.m.KINGFIELD – Webster Hall at 38 School Street – open at 8 a.m.NEW SHARON – town office at 11 School Lane – open at 8 a.m.NEW VINEYARD – Smith Memorial Hall at 1680 New Vineyard Road – opens at 8 a.m.PHILLIPS (& Madrid) – Phillips Primary School at 15 Russell Street – opens at 8 a.m.RANGELEY – town office at 15 School Street – opens at 8 a.m.RANGELEY PLANTATION – School House at 393 South Shore Drive – opens at 10 a.m.SANDY RIVER PLANTATION – town office at 33 Town Hall Road – opens at 10 a.m.STRONG (& Freeman) – Forster Memorial Building at 14 South Main – opens at 8 a.m.TEMPLE – town hall at 258 Temple Road – opens at 8 a.m.WELD – multi-purpose room at 23 Mill Street – opens at 10 a.m.WILTON – municipal building at 158 Weld Road – opens at 8 a.m.last_img read more


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first_imgThe winter 2019 Lettuce Vibe Up Tour is now underway, and will see the funk favorites traverse the country with help from rising acts like Ghost-Note and The Greyhounds throughout the first two months of this year. In addition to the aforementioned musical support, Lettuce will be accompanied on their tour by their friends at HeadCount‘s Cannabis Voter Project.The Cannabis Voter Project will be on hand at 12 different Lettuce shows this month. At each tour stop, and information table will be set up where attendees can peruse CannabisVoter.Info and learn about the state of marijuana legislation at the local, state, and federal level.Related: Lettuce Kicks Off Vibe Up Tour With Unreleased Music, MonoNeon Sit-InFans who sign up for the Cannabis Voter Project’s email listserv at any of the upcoming Lettuce tour stops will receive a custom “Lettuce Vote” stress ball shaped like a head of lettuce courtesy of California-based cannabis brand CannaCraft [picured above]. Fans can also register to vote through CannbisVoter.Info in addition to taking other actions to get involved in the political process surrounding marijuana law reform.As Lettuce guitarist Adam “Schmeeans” Smirnoff tells Live For Live Music, “This is a topic that we care about; and all cannabis laws are not good laws, but all educated voters are good voters.”In addition, Lettuce will donate $1 from the sale of each ticket during the month of January toward supporting and helping to grow the reach of the Cannabis Voter Project. For every tour stop, the organization will also release information about what’s happening in cannabis policy in the given area via their social media channels. You can follow along on Facebook, Twitter (@Cannabis_Voter), or Instagram (@Cannabis_Voter)The Cannabis Voter Project was launched by HeadCount in 2018 as a way of informing Americans about how their vote can impact cannabis policy. HeadCount aims to use the Cannabis Voter Project as a way to engage Americans that otherwise may not have registered to vote in the political process.According to The Cannabis Voter Project, recent research has revealed that, for the first time, the majority of the House of Representatives (224 out of 435 members) believes that states should be able to set their own policies with regard to the legality of recreational marijuana. They also note that the House majority that supports medical marijuana has increased from 244 to 267—a direct result of the 2018 midterm elections, which saw the highest voter turnout in a century.last_img read more


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first_img In awe of the clam Olivia Lee (pictured) from Cambridge’s Martin Luther King Jr. School admires the giant clam on display in “Mollusks: Shelled Masters of the Marine Realm.” Beautiful hulls A variety of coned shells on display. Recognize any from past vacations? Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer Shelling out Mollusk man In a lecture at the Harvard Museum of Natural History, Professor Gonzalo Giribet discussed how scientists are decoding the Mollusca genetic family tree to learn how they’ve adapted, survived, and thrived since the pre-Cambrian era. ‘Bearing foreigners’ Carrier snails, or Xenophoridae (which means “bearing foreigners” in Greek), on display in the Harvard Museum of Natural History.center_img Tentacled The wonder of the octopus. Behold! Mighty world of mollusks Curatorial Associate and Collection Manager Adam Baldinger speaks about the new exhibit “Mollusks” at the Harvard Museum of Natural History. Wondrous Carlos Alvarado (pictured) from the Kelly School in Chelsea admires some of the exhibit’s great wonders. Escargot, anyone?The Harvard Museum of Natural History is offering a molluskan feast — for the eyes, anyway — in the new exhibit “Mollusks: Shelled Masters of the Marine Realm,” which recently opened in the museum’s temporary exhibit hall.The exhibit, which will be on display for the next two years, presents a colorful depiction of the diversity of the mollusk branch of the tree of life, spanning everything from the giant clam — a 30-inch shell on display weighs 200 pounds — to the octopus.In between are the flat, orange, lion’s paw scallop; the tall, cylindrical, watering pot clam; an arthritic spider conch whose six splayed points extend from its shell; and a Venus comb murex, whose shell displays rows of long, comb-like, narrow spikes. The exhibit also includes a case holding specimens from the museum’s glass sea creatures collection, which was created in the 1800s by Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka, the same artists who made Harvard’s famed glass flowers.Beyond the specimens themselves, colorful exhibit panels explain the different types of mollusks, which also include snails and squids, provide a look at their commercial importance, and highlight ongoing Harvard research on them, which entails both genetic analysis and advanced imaging.Gonzalo Giribet, professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and curator of invertebrates in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, has collected mollusks and their shells around the world and is working to construct a mollusk family tree. Giribet, who curated the exhibit, said mollusks are easier to study than soft-bodied invertebrates because even after a mollusk dies, it leaves a shell behind for examination.When asked his favorite specimen, Giribet points not to one of the flashy shells, but to a nondescript, limpet-like mollusk that grows just a millimeter across. These monoplacophorans, Giribet said, were thought to have become extinct millions of years ago until one was discovered alive in the 1950s. It has been one of Giribet’s goals to obtain one, which he did four years ago during a research dredging in 1,200 feet of water off San Diego.“I didn’t want to die without collecting one,” Giribet said.Curatorial associate Adam Baldinger, who helped select specimens for display, made a flashier choice. His favorite is a carrier snail whose shell is several inches high, and onto which it sticks other shells, providing camouflage as well as an unusual display.If there’s one message Giribet hopes visitors take from the exhibit, it’s that mollusks are extremely diverse, with snails, the most populous branch, having an estimated 70,000 to 120,000 species, followed by clams and other bivalves, at 20,000. Mollusks range from the deep ocean to fresh water to land. And, should some visitors become inspired to find out more about this broad-ranging part of earth’s biosphere, there’s still lots of research to be done.“We know there are many species undiscovered,” Giribet said.last_img read more


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first_imgArchitecture should be more than an intersection of art and commerce.“I see architecture as almost a political work,” said Remment “Rem” Koolhaas, the superstar Dutch architect, touching on his signature ethos, his condemnation of architecture’s passivity and its inability and unwillingness to confront or resolve the socio-political complexities of urban life, problems often stoked by globalization. A bold, trailblazing architectural theorist, writer, and a professor of architecture and urban design at Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD), Koolhaas spoke about a changing Europe and the ideas behind four recent projects in Taiwan, Russia, Qatar, and Milan, his “current preoccupations,” before a capacity crowd at GSD Tuesday evening.Sometimes compared with Le Corbusier for his work’s global reach, its rejection of nostalgia, and its enduring focus on the urban metropolis, the Pritzker Prize-winner is one of architecture’s most prolific and influential figures of the last 50 years.While there are many talents working in the field today, “There are very few people who you can name around the world who manage to combine extraordinary inventiveness and innovation” in their design work and who are also “at the very center of contemporary thought, engaged with contemporary issues,” said Dean Mohsen Mostafavi in his introduction.Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren of OMA were the architects in charge of China’s Central TV Headquarters, while Cecil Balmond at Arup provided the complex engineering design.Credit: poeloq / Creative Commons“We are in a radically divided world” in which “architecture is not dealing with those political issues in a really sophisticated way,” said Koolhaas, whose global design firm in Rotterdam, the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), includes a related research and design think tank focused on pushing architecture into broader cultural and organizational realms and producing exhibitions like the Venice Biennale (an event he calls “self-congratulatory”), corporate branding and strategic planning, media and publishing, and advancing energy technology.“I think that both the art world and the architecture world … are clearly dedicated to political correctness and therefore [are] pretty intolerant in terms of engaging” with political worlds beyond Western democracies.Known for his deadpan wit and blunt provocations when talking about his work and the profession, Koolhaas referred to himself as “a militant European” and sharply criticized what he sees as the “very dangerous” generational crisis between the old and young in Europe today.“People over 50 have a tendency to worry, and people under 50 have a tendency not to care,” he said, attributing the disastrous Brexit vote, which threatens to damage both Great Britain and the European continent, as well as the re-emergence of far right-wing political powers in Europe, to the casual negligence of young voter apathy. It’s a dynamic, he says, that’s compelled him to become even more vocal in his criticism of what he called the forces of pessimism and intimidation.Discussing his latest projects, Koolhaas said the outlandish design for a performing arts center in downtown Taipei was informed by the vibrancy and authenticity of street life that surrounds the site. The center, situated directly over a busy open-air night market, was inspired by a three-sectioned cooking pot used by the market’s street food vendors. Just as the three-sectioned pot allows the cook to prepare and serve three dishes at the same time, the center offers three theater spaces under one roof that can be connected when necessary.At the Fondazione Prada, an ambitious museum, theater, and display space for the Italian luxury brand in Milan that’s still under construction eight years after it began, Koolhaas described the alternation between open and closed spaces, the juxtaposition of elements preserved from an old distillery that used to occupy the site, and the modernity of the reflecting, mirrored structures as a way of conceiving and thinking about today’s Europe, a political body that’s both old and young.“People over 50 have a tendency to worry, and people under 50 have a tendency not to care,” said Rem Koolhaas, attributing the disastrous Brexit vote, which he believes threatens to damage both Great Britain and the European continent. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerAsked about the merits of a universal, collective approach to design versus an individual approach, Koolhaas said, “One of our rarely questioned, self-mythologizing pretensions has been that our work is less ego-driven and less author-driven, and therefore we [convince] ourselves all our buildings are completely different and don’t look like each other,” something he called merely “reminiscent of collectivity.” He scoffed at the idea that a generic architectural style offers an “escape from the extravagance of individual architectural statement.”“I’m not saying that that is all untrue, but you can read the exact opposite in what we do. You can say it’s an extreme or better-disguised form of artistic drive, or maybe the elements we use are better camouflaged or more abstract. So I don’t think it’s fundamentally different, but I think that we are simply more reluctant to impose our own individual stamp or better able to hide that,” he said.“Let me put it this way: It’s not between ‘universal thinking’ and ‘individual thinking.’ It’s between thinking and not thinking.”SaveSaveSavelast_img read more


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first_imgSaint Mary’s religious studies professor Jessica Wrobleski spoke Wednesday night about the way contemporary views of sex can be understood in the context of Catholic teaching. The lecture, “The Meaning of Sex,” was one of a series of lectures called “Theology on Fire.” It was the first of several sponsored by Saint Mary’s Campus Ministry and the Center for Spirituality. The ideas for the lectures are developed from controversial issues concerning college students and the Catholic Church, senior Emma Hoffman, who organized the event, said. “We want to explore topics that come up in our peers’ conversation, or more importantly, what doesn’t,” Hoffman said. Wrobleski focused on students’ personal understanding of sex and sexuality in modern society. She said personal awareness of sex is necessary in contemporary culture. “Sex is an inevitable, unavoidable aspect of life. Whether you encounter it in a magazine, a television show or a relationship, it is something as young, single people, we can’t help but think about,” Wrobleski said. She spoke about the various definitions of sex and how students can discern significance from different settings, such as premarital sex, casual sex and sex between two people of the same gender, while observing Catholic understanding. “I want students to understand that sexuality is not primarily a list of arbitrary rules, but rather something that allows us to deeply connect with God as humans,” Wrobleski said. Junior Emily Kieffer said the lecture connected the different ways students view sex. “It went beyond what the Church tells you or what you read in Cosmo. I thought the lecture really brought sex in to a perspective that is valuable for me as a college student and as a human,” Kieffer said. Junior Teresa Cristarella agreed. “It was nice to discuss sexuality and in the Church in a non-condemning way, rather than the consequential way that it is normally viewed,” Cristarella said. Wrobleski encouraged students who have questions about their sexuality or sex’s role in their life to talk to peers, married couples and religious figures. “Sex, at its base, is a relationship, and it is best understood by discussing it with others that are in your shoes or have experience with your situation,” Wrobleski said. Wrobleski will also be offering a Religious Studies course this spring called “Theologies of Love.” The curriculum focuses on relationships and broader questions of love.last_img read more


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first_imgYou’re not getting the best flavor from your vegetable garden if you’re not growing your own herbs, too. On “The Georgia Gardener” May 13 and 15, host Walter Reeves and guest Wayne McLaurin will talk about herbs as they plant the 10 leading herbs for gardens in the Southeast.Walter will show how and when it’s best to spray roses for black spot, too. He’ll also examine different kinds of hose-end sprayers and help you pick out the best for you. Finally, he’ll show how to divide the seedlings you buy from your garden shop and get more plants for your money.”The Georgia Gardener” is designed especially for Georgia gardeners. It airs Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 10 a.m. on GPTV. The show is a production of the University of Georgia  College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and PFC Holding Company.last_img read more


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first_imgDear EarthTalk: With all the talk of desalinization of ocean water for drinking, what do we know about the impacts this might have on climate, ocean salinity and other natural processes?                                                                                                                         — Fred Kuepper, via e-mail Due to its high cost, energy intensiveness and overall ecological footprint, most environmental advocates view desalinization (or desalination)—the conversion of salty ocean water into fresh water—as a last resort for providing fresh water to needy populations. Sourcing fresh water from streams, rivers, lakes and underground aquifers and adhering to strict water conservation measures are much more viable for both economic and environmental reasons in most situations, although some desert regions with thirsty and growing populations may not have many such options. The relationship between desalinization and climate change is complex. Global warming has increased droughts around the world and turned formerly verdant landscapes into near deserts. Some long held fresh water sources are simply no longer reliably available to hundreds of millions of people around the world. Meanwhile, expanding populations in desert areas are putting intense pressure on existing fresh water supplies, forcing communities to turn to desalinization as the most expedient way to satisfy their collective thirst. But the process of desalinization burns up many more fossil fuels than sourcing the equivalent amount of fresh water from fresh water bodies. As such, the very proliferation of desalinization plants around the world—some 13,000 already supply fresh water in 120 nations, primarily in the Middle East, North Africa and Caribbean—is both a reaction to and one of many contributors to global warming. Beyond the links to climate problems, marine biologists warn that widespread desalinization could take a heavy toll on ocean biodiversity; as such facilities’ intake pipes essentially vacuum up and inadvertently kill millions of plankton, fish eggs, fish larvae and other microbial organisms that constitute the base layer of the marine food chain. And, according to Jeffrey Graham of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography’s Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, the salty sludge leftover after desalinization—for every gallon of freshwater produced, another gallon of doubly concentrated salt water must be disposed of—can wreak havoc on marine ecosystems if dumped willy-nilly offshore. “For some desalinization operations,” says Graham, “it is thought that the disappearance of some organisms from discharge areas may be related to…the salty outflow.” Of course, as supplies of fresh water dwindle, the economic cost of desalinization—especially in coastal areas with easy access to ocean water—begins to look competitive with traditional water sourcing. To date there are about 300 desalinization plants in the United States, with 120 in Florida and less than 40 each in Texas and California. Some 20 additional plants are planned for the coast of California in the coming years, unless environmentalists extolling the virtues of conservation and wielding low-flow shower heads and toilets prevail. CONTACT: Scripps’ Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, www.cmbb.ucsd.edu. GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail: [email protected] Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.phplast_img read more