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first_imgDebris‐covered glaciers are ubiquitous in the Himalaya, and supraglacial debris significantly alters how glaciers respond to climate forcing. Estimating debris thickness at the glacier scale, however, remains a challenge. This study inverts a subdebris melt model to estimate debris thickness for three glaciers in the Everest region from digital elevation model difference‐derived elevation change. Flux divergences are estimated from ice thickness and surface velocity data. Monte Carlo simulations are used to incorporate the uncertainties associated with debris properties, flux divergence, and elevation change. On Ngozumpa Glacier, surface lowering data from 2010 to 2012 and 2012 to 2014 are used to calibrate and validate the method, respectively. The debris thickness estimates are consistent with existing in situ measurements. The method performs well over both actively flowing and stagnant parts of the glacier and is able to accurately estimate thicker debris (>0.5 m). Uncertainties associated with the thermal conductivity and elevation change contribute the most to uncertainties of the debris thickness estimates. The surface lowering associated with ice cliffs and supraglacial ponds was found to significantly reduce debris thickness, especially for thicker debris. The method is also applied to Khumbu and Imja‐Lhotse Shar Glaciers to highlight its potential for regional application.last_img read more


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first_img Tags: Northern Arizona Football/SUU Football November 14, 2019 /Sports News – Local SUU Football Hosts Northern Arizona Saturday Written by Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCEDAR CITY, Utah-Saturday, Southern Utah football (2-8, 1-5 in Big Sky Conference play) hosts Northern Arizona (4-6, 2-4 in Big Sky play) in the Grand Canyon Rivalry for Senior Day at Eccles Coliseum.The Thunderbirds will honor 10 seniors Saturday.SUU ranks 79th nationally in scoring offense (24.6 points per game).In what has been a disappointing season, redshirt sophomore quarterback Chris Helbing has consistently impressed.Helbig completes 65.7 percent of his passes (230-350, 13th nationally) for 13 touchdowns and 11 interceptions. He has also tossed for 2,404 yards (23rd nationally) for the Thunderbirds. Helbig has also run for six scores, primarily in goal-line situations.Redshirt junior tailback James Helila (89 car, 337 yards, 2 TD’s) and sophomore running mate Thomas Duckett (55 car, 247 yards, 2 TD’s) have been the Thunderbirds’ best tailbacks throughout the season. Senior back Jay Green Jr. (35 car, 120 yards) has the most touchdowns among tailbacks for SUU with three in 2019.Sophomore tailback Lance Lawson (70 rec, 646 yards, 3 TD’s) continues to be the Thunderbirds’ most productive receiver. Freshman receiver Zach Nelson (13 rec, 200 yards, 3 TD’s) ties Lawson for the team lead in receiving touchdowns.Senior receiver Carlos Baker (12 rec, 253 yards, TD) is the Thunderbirds’ leading receiver in yards per catch with 21.1 yards per grab.Junior kicker Manny Berz has made 3 of his 5 field goal attempts on the season for SUU. Redshirt junior kicker/punter Kekoa Sasaoka has made 30 of his 31 PAT attempts on the season as well for the Thunderbirds.SUU ranks 118th nationally in scoring defense (38.5 points per game). Sophomore defensive lineman Aaron Romero has a team-best 4.5 sacks and a forced fumble to pace the Thunderbirds.Redshirt freshman defensive back Carlton Johnson (3 interceptions) continues to lead SUU on the season in that category.Redshirt sophomore safety AJ Stanley, redshirt sophomore linebacker Quaid Murray, sophomore defensive end Francis Bemiy and redshirt senior safety Kyle Hannemann all have a forced fumble as well on the season for SUU.The Lumberjacks come into Saturday’s game following a 38-34 defeat at the hands of Sacramento State at the Walkup Skydome of Flagstaff, Ariz.Northern Arizona brings in one of the more explosive offenses in the country, posting 36.3 points per game (12th nationally).Senior signal-caller and NFL Draft prospect Case Cookus completes 59.3 percent of his passes (229-386) for 3,339 yards (first nationally), 27 touchdowns (tied for 6th nationally) and 7 interceptions for the Lumberjacks.Senior tailback Joe Logan (149 car, 657 yards, 11 touchdowns) is the Lumberjacks’ top tailback.Among Cookus’ top targets for Northern Arizona are redshirt sophomore receiver Brandon Porter (66 rec, 897 yards, 8 TD’s) and redshirt junior wide-out Stacy Chukwumezie (37 rec, 801 yards, 7 TD’s). Each of these receivers, No. 15 and No. 32 respectively in receiving yards, have been dynamic throughout the season for Cookus.Junior kicker/punter Luis Aguilar has made 15 of his 17 field goal attempts on the season and all 44 of his PAT attempts for the explosive Lumberjacks.Northern Arizona’s defense is among the worst units in the country. The Lumberjacks surrender 40.5 points (121st nationally) and 510.6 yards (122nd nationally) per game.Junior linebacker Carson Taylor and freshman defensive lineman Eloi Kwete have 3 sacks apiece for teh Lumberjacks.Redshirt sophomore defensive back Anthony Sweeney, junior linebacker Harrison Beemiller, senior linebacker Brandon Worthy, junior linebacker Taylor Powell, freshman linebacker Jaden Tauanu’u, freshman defensive back Daego Albert and redshirt sophomore ATH Nate Perkins all have an interception apiece for the Lumberjacks.Sweeney, Beemiller, senior defensive back Khalil Dorsey, senior defensive back Jalen Cook, senior linebacker Chris Jules, Taylor, Worthy and senior defensive lineman Jonathan Lolohea all have a forced fumble as well for Northern Arizona.The Lumberjacks lead the Thunderbirds 13-9 all-time and are 5-2 all-time at Cedar City.last_img read more


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first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Exclusive: This is why Purplebricks failed in Australia, explains portal executive previous nextAgencies & PeopleExclusive: This is why Purplebricks failed in Australia, explains portal executiveA senior figure from the the country’s property industry reveals in a video interview why he believes Purplebricks failed so spectacularly in Oz.Nigel Lewis25th September 201902,804 Views As Purplebricks finishes closing its business in Australia at an estimated cost of £41 million, one of the country’s senior property industry figures has said that its biggest mistake was to ‘go hard on price’.Steve Carroll (pictured above), who is Director of Industry Relations at the Oz equivalent to Rightmove, the REA Group, says Purplebricks misunderstood the strong emotional attachment to property in Australia.“It was black and white – you can save money by using Purplebricks,” he says in an interview with Chris Watkins given exclusively to The Negotiator.“That didn’t resonate with Australians because people in Oz don’t mind giving an agent 2-3% of the sale value if the agent does a really good job of selling their property for a premium price, but I don’t think Purplebricks fully understood that.”AuctionsHe also explains in the video (see below) that, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne, many homes are sold via auction, a service that Purplebricks didn’t offer.Carroll also accuses the company of not doing its homework before entering the Australian housing market, and that he doesn’t believe the company sought advice from anyone prior to its launch in August 2016, including anyone at REA.In May this year Purplebricks announced it had lost $18 million during the first half of its financial year to October 2018 and new CEO Vic Darvey subsequently announced it would close the business, citing ‘market conditions’ as the main cause. It currently has 151 properties still awaiting a buyer and 70 agents featured on its website.Watch the video: steve carroll Purplebricks Rightmove Purplebricks Australia REA Group September 25, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more


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first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » What downturn? Connells to recruit 250 more agents with more later previous nextAgencies & PeopleWhat downturn? Connells to recruit 250 more agents with more laterAgency says jobs will be at Connells and Sequence branches with more roles for other brands later on.Nigel Lewis24th November 20200996 Views Connells has revealed a significant new recruitment drive to create 250 new roles across most of its 600-branch business including at this own and Sequence offices.The company has also said the initiative is a commitment to the high street model and that online-only has no value with consumers, and claimed that agencies who have embraced ‘hubs’ have not done well.Connells says the first tranche of new jobs will be across the full range of estate agency roles, and is part of a plan to grow the business, increase market share and show its commitment to the its high street branch network.Its Group Estate Agency Chief Executive, David Plumtree (pictured), says Connells has ‘a fierce ambition for even bigger and better things’.“This significant investment in people forms a key part of our plan to further increase our market share, plus affirms our commitment to our high street branch operation.“It is clear to us that those agents who skilfully combine traditional agency, allied with great branch staff with local knowledge and who are supported by smart tech, are those who are thriving.Online only“Recent years have shown that vendors see no value in using online only agents, and those agents who have closed branches in favour of a hub strategy have lost market share in so doing.“For us at Connells Group it is all about our people. Many firms push the message that their people are their greatest asset yet don’t back up those words when the going gets tough.“As a consequence of the way in which we supported our people, as well as our unstinting commitment to traditional agency, we don’t anticipate any difficulty in filling these newly created roles.”Read more: Connells latest on its Countrywide takeover plans.Picture: Express & Staronline only recruitment connells David Plumtree November 24, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more


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first_imgThis fall, nine undergraduates and five graduate students took a new Harvard history course called “The Modern Persian Gulf Region: Politics, Economy and Society.” Developed and taught by Arbella Bet-Shlimon, a recent graduate of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies’ joint Ph.D. program in history and Middle Eastern studies, the course is one of few Harvard history courses in recent memory to focus on the modern Persian Gulf region. Gulf history, says Bet-Shlimon, is not a common topic in Middle Eastern studies in the U.S., where Egypt and the Levant are usually seen as the core of the Arab world, receiving the most attention in scholarship and on syllabuses. The Gulf is often treated as a side topic. That’s a mistake, according to Bet-Shlimon: “It can’t be marginalized any more. I think the Gulf needs to be centered rather than marginalized within the broader Middle East.” When the region is studied, it tends to be from the perspective of political science and security studies. “Historical perspective,” Bet-Shlimon maintains, “is really needed to contextualize contemporary studies.” Her course’s unit on oil, for instance, which is titled “The Political Economy and Social Life of Oil,” considers oil not just as an economic force, but as a political force as well, and also explores the social effects of the presence of the oil industry in Gulf countries. Read Full Storylast_img read more


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first_imgSAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — A heavy winter storm is battering Bermuda and has forced the British territory to cancel some flights and close schools early. Forecasters at the Bermuda Weather Service warn of sustained winds of up to 58 mph and gusts of up to 81 mph until midnight Thursday. They says there is a small chance of hail Friday, with conditions expected to ease by Saturday. Ferry service has been cancelled, while government offices and the island’s international airport remain open. The government says the storm delayed by one day the arrival of a plane carrying thousands of doses of a coronavirus vaccine.last_img


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first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaThe class assignment was to find an organization to help and make a memorable impression on its people. University of Georgia student Liberty Newberry felt her group’s 200-foot slip-n-slide, though fun, just wasn’t enough.This summer, Newberry took “Leadership and Service,” a UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Science course designed to help students gain an understanding of leadership as it pertains to their lives.As part of the class, the students divide into teams for a service-learning project. Newberry and her five-man team decided to help an Athens-area Boys and Girls Club, and to get a little muddy while doing it.The club’s needs were many, said Kyler Dennis, a team member. The adults there needed a break, and the kids needed a change.The group felt there was one thing they could do for the club. All it took was a little time, water and 200 feet of plastic stretched down a hill to make a supervised, water-soaked field day for the kids.“There are only four adults there with about 60 kids,” said Dennis, who is a junior majoring in business. “We really just wanted to take a load off of them for the day. For me, it was an eye opener. I’ve never really done any volunteer work at all.”But was that enough?“By throwing a field day for the kids, I don’t think I left a lasting impression,” said Newberry, a senior consumer foods major from Asheville, N.C. As the group cleaned up, Newberry overheard a boy tell a club leader that he wanted to go to the club’s summer camp, but his mom didn’t have the money.“They had a stack of forms for kids who couldn’t pay to go,” Newberry said. Newberry decided then to raise money for children who couldn’t afford the camp, which costs $50 per child. She wanted to raise $450 to send nine children. She got $150 from family members. She rallied her classmates for the rest. “They jumped on so quickly and were so willing to help out,” Newberry said. “It was really cool.”The class is taught by CAES assistant professors Chris Morgan and Dennis Duncan. “My objective is that the students understand where and who they are as leaders,” Morgan said. “How do you develop leadership skills in someone? That’s the question.”Instead of using a textbook, Morgan and Duncan take a conversational approach. They then send the students out into the community to work. There the students learn whether they are leaders or supporters, their strengths and weaknesses and how to improve.The instructors provide their students with a list of nonprofit organizations, ranging from animal shelters to the YMCA, in the Athens area. They give students free reign to determine an organization’s need and come up with a way to meet it.It challenges students to identify and explore their potential, Duncan said. Morgan calls it authentic leadership. “It’s really not trying to be someone you’re not,” he said. “It’s based on your values and strengths. If you’re not strong in an area, let someone else do it.”The CAES students haven’t stopped working with the club. They are now trying to repair computers and have others donated to the club. A leadership day is in the works for this fall, and they are putting together a fund for the club to give summer camp scholarships.“These kids need to have a fair shot,” Newberry said. “If they aren’t ever given the opportunity, then what chance do they have?”(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more


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first_imgby: Christina PontissoHave you been shopping around for the best credit card for you? If so, have you considered getting a credit card through a credit union instead of a bank? You’d be smart to find out that you’re better off getting a credit card from a credit union.The biggest reason to consider a credit union credit card: LOWER interest rates. Credit unions can offer lower rates because of their non-profit status. Which is great news for you, that leaves you more money in your pocket!According to CUNA, an average interest rate for a basic credit card from a credit union was 11.81% vs 15.77% from a bank.Another reason to consider a credit union credit card: LOWER late fees. In 2015, CUNA reported an average late fee for credit unions was $24.56 compared to $34.18 at banks. Do you see a pattern yet (hint: lower rates and lower fees at credit unions)? continue reading » 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


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first_imgGarnar says most cases are tied to bars and restaurants on the west side of Binghamton. Garnar says the spread of the virus is “almost out of control” in the county. He said people should host activities virtually and get take out for one week to help slow the spread. (WBNG) — Broome County Executive Jason Garnar is urging people to stay home after the number of positive COVID-19 cases spiked to 243 on Tuesday. In addition to this, the county reports 1,100 residents are in quarantine. The county expects a “number” of people in quarantine to become positive cases.last_img


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first_imgOffshore drilling contractor Transocean recorded a wider loss in the first quarter of 2020 when compared to the same period last year due to asset impairments. Transocean’s current contract backlog is $9.6 billion. Net loss attributable to controlling interest was $392 million compared with a net loss of $51 million in the fourth quarter of 2019 and a net loss of $171 million in 1Q 2019. Contract drilling revenues for 1Q 2020 decreased sequentially by $33 million, primarily due to reduced activity related to rigs that were idle and lower revenue efficiency. After consideration of these net unfavourable items, first quarter 2020 adjusted net loss was $187 million. This compares with an adjusted net loss of $263 million in the previous quarter. Total contract drilling revenues were $759 million compared with $792 million in the fourth quarter of 2019 and $754 million in 1Q 2019. center_img First-quarter 2020 results included net unfavourable items of $205 million. This included $167 million loss on impairment of assets and $57 million loss on retirement of debt. Jeremy Thigpen, Transocean President and Chief Executive Officer, said: “Looking forward, we recognize the dramatic decline in oil prices, coupled with the continued uncertainties surrounding the containment of COVID-19, and the resumption of the global economy, will invariably delay the contracting activity that we expected in 2020”. These decreases were partially offset by a full quarter of revenues from the recently reactivated ultra‑deepwater floaters Deepwater Mykonos and Deepwater Corcovado. Photo by SP Maclast_img read more


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