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first_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: Fast-Attack View post tag: Louisville View post tag: visits Back to overview,Home naval-today Los Angeles-Class Fast-Attack Submarine USS Louisville Visits Malaysia Share this article April 4, 2012 Training & Education View post tag: USS View post tag: Los Los Angeles-Class Fast-Attack Submarine USS Louisville Visits Malaysia View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: submarine View post tag: Malaysia The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Louisville (SSN 724) arrived in Malaysia April 3 for a visit as part of its deployment to the western Pacific.Louisville moored alongside USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) to receive tended support for the submarine tender.“We anticipate performing a variety of submarine support services for Louisville to ensure all systems are fully functioning and operational when she returns to sea,” said Lt. Cmdr. James Hicks, Emory S. Land’s production maintenance officer.Emory S. Land’s Repair Department is capable of providing tended support to U.S. submarines worldwide. Land can conduct equipment adjustments, repair and manufacturing to ensure the continued readiness of Louisville and quality of life for its crew during their deployment.With a crew of more than 145 Sailors and officers, Louisville will conduct a multitude of missions and showcase the latest capabilities of the submarine fleet.“I visited Sepangar on a previous deployment, so I am excited for my crew to see this beautiful country, be exposed to its rich culture, and interact with its people,” said Cmdr. Lee P. Sisco, commanding officer. “It is mutually beneficial for the United States Navy and royal Malaysian navy to have professional and personal interactions between our service members. Not only does this help us to improve each other’s capabilities through shared ideas and knowledge, but we also build upon the trust and cooperation that are critical in our relationship as counterparts.”Louisville is a multi-mission platform that can operate independently, or in conjunction with carrier strike groups and joint forces to support the mission of the United States Navy throughout the world.“From the moment Louisville left Pearl Harbor, our Sailors have stayed focused, active and alert,” said Senior Chief Fire Control Technician Joseph Bransfield, chief of the boat. “Each Sailor on board knows that ownership, stewardship and high standards lead to excellence, which in turn results in quality liberty. While we are in port we plan to spend time reconnecting with family and friends, recharging our batteries and forging new memories with our shipmates.”For most of the crew members, this is their first time visiting Malaysia.“Growing up in a small New England town, I didn’t experience much diversity,” said Electronics Technician Seaman Joshua Hamilton. “Our port visit to Malaysia will be my first chance to experience a new culture. After being underway for so long I am excited to be in the sun again and participate in the Malaysian outdoors.”Measuring more than 360 feet long and weighing more than 6,000 tons when submerged, Louisville is one of the most advanced and stealthiest attack submarines in the world. Louisville uses her stealth, mobility, endurance, and firepower to perform missions in undersea warfare, surface warfare, strike warfare, mine warfare, battlespace preparation including intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance, and combat search and rescue.Louisville is homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Commissioned in 1986, it is the fourth United States ship to bear the name.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , April 04, 2012; View post tag: Angeles-Classlast_img read more


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first_imgJen Giattino ×Jen Giattino HOBOKEN — Hoboken City Council President Jen Giattino will be making an “important announcement addressing Hoboken’s upcoming mayoral race this November” on Tuesday, 7:30 in Hoboken, according to a press release received at the end of the day on Monday. The press conference is scheduled during a Board of Education meeting, so hopefully she’s not pulling people away to announce that she won’t run.After Mayor Dawn Zimmer announced last week that she would not run for re-election, Zimmer endorsed Councilman Ravi Bhalla for the spot. But several allies of Zimmer had their own ideas about who should run, and were irked that they weren’t consulted.Giattino said last week that she may run.So is her announcement a chance for her to say she’s running, or throw her support behind another candidate?The press release said, “The City Council President will announce her decision on becoming a mayoral candidate in Hoboken.” RSVP’s were to go to Councilwoman Tiffanie Fisher.Some have speculated that should she run, she will have to explain her past status as a registered Republican, and give her stance on issues related to the Donald Trump, in a town that has fought some of Trump’s policies.Freeholder Anthony Romano also plans to announce he will run for mayor on Tuesday, in the morning.Councilman Michael DeFusco and businesswoman Karen Nason have already announced their candidacy.Who else will run? Perhaps you? Email [email protected]last_img read more


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first_imgAccording to The Festive Owl and a few inside sources, the team behind Electric Forest has turned in signed permits for back-to-back weekends in The Forest. The beloved Rothbury, MI event now looks like it will expand, as the local city council is currently discussing the permit and are leaning towards approval.Permitting issues have been a constant distraction for promoters and fans since the site was first used as Rothbury in 2008, when the festival was still owned by independents. Now, as original owners Madison House Presents and Insomniac Presents have been purchased by industry giants AEG Live and Live Nation, respectively, it seems that the festival has seen its luck change, and we can now expect multiple weekends of magic at the Double JJ Ranch next summer.This report creates a handful of questions. Will the String Cheese Incident headline Friday, Saturday, and Sunday on both weekends? Will the lineups stay the same from weekend-to-weekend, or will each one be unique? Will Bassnectar become king of the second weekend, as the new resident artist of Electric Forest? Will we see a return of Rothbury as a more jam and classic rock-heavy event, with Electric Forest moving more and more into the realm of dance music? Stay tuned for more information as it’s provided.last_img read more


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first_imgToday, Kung Fu has announced their 2018 fall tour dates, including a joint leg with Perpetual Groove. Perpetual Groove and Kung Fu’s joint fall tour begins on October 11th at Richmond, Virginia’s The National, which precedes a two-night run at Washington, D.C.’s Union Station on October 12th and 13th. Moving north, the two jam acts travel to the Ardmore Music Hall outside Philadelphia on October 14th before heading to Colorado on November 7th. To close out their joint shows, the Kung Fu and P-Groove will perform across the Centennial State from November 7th to 10th, stopping in Fort Collins, Boulder, Frisco, and Denver.Kung Fu also announced a number of additional tour dates surrounding their shows with Perpetual Groove. In addition to a number of previously announced music festival appearances, the group will perform a special moe. afterparty in Utica, New York on September 8th. The group also confirmed shows in Rochester, New York, and Erie, Pennsylvania, on September 20th and 21st between appearances at Wormtown Music Festival and Resonance Music Festival. Continuing on, the band will perform in Plains, PA (9/27); Saratoga Springs, NY (9/28); and Roanoke, VA (10/10) before meeting up with P-Groove for the first leg of their joint tour.After Perpetual Groove and Kung Fu’s stop at the Ardmore on October 14th, the band heads west, with the band offering performances of “Fez West”—reprising the band’s 2017 Fez tour featuring shows that combine Kung Fu originals with the music of Steely Dan—throughout the run. This “Fez West” leg begins on October 18th in Seattle, with the band continuing on through Bend, Portland, Eugene, Applegate, Arcata, Los Angeles, and Ocean Beach before a more traditional festival appearance at Hangtown Music Festival. From there, Kung Fu will meet back up with P-Groove, closing out the entirety of their fall tour in Colorado.For more information or ticketing, head to Kung Fu’s website here.last_img read more


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first_imgMEXICO CITY — On Avenue San Fernando, a tree-lined street crowded with food stands, the new wing of Mexico’s flagship cancer hospital gleams like a silver airplane. Barely a year old, the light-filled structure attached to the National Institute of Cancer of Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, or INCan) represents a national commitment to cancer care for the poor.Just a decade ago, half of all Mexicans — 52 million people — had no health insurance. As many as 4 million families a year faced financial ruin because of catastrophic illness, like breast cancer.Today, those same families have access to treatment because of Seguro Popular. The universal health care initiative, launched in 2003 and largely powered by Harvard research, is funded with less than 1 percent of the country’s GDP. It has gradually expanded to cover a range of catastrophic illnesses. Breast cancer, with its fast-rising rates and ever-younger victims, was added in 2007.Good thing. Around the same time, breast cancer replaced cervical cancer as the No. 1 killer of women 30 to 54. To make matters worse, before 2007 about 30 percent of breast-cancer patients dropped out of treatment because they ran out of money. That figure has fallen to less than 1 percent.The Harvard research behind Seguro Popular is part of a synergy that University experts call “evidence-based advocacy.” The idea: Good deeds and good policy in public health are driven by good data.“Evidence makes visible the invisible,” said Julio Frenk, the chief architect of Seguro Popular.A medical doctor and a longtime student of the world’s health systems, Frenk has been dean of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH) since 2009, a few years removed from his service as Mexico’s Minister of Health, from 2000 to 2006. (He was also founding director-general of Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health.) At HSPH, Frenk oversees one of the key University entities in a complex web of research and alumni ties with Mexico.Among the “invisible” that good evidence reveals, Frenk said, are the poor living at the margins of developing and middle-income nations such as Mexico. He attributed the sentiment to his friend Amartya Sen, Harvard’s Thomas W. Lamont University Professor, whose book “Development as Freedom” (2000) summarizes in its title the Nobel laureate’s life mission.Data bumped Seguro Popular into existence, starting in 1994, when Frenk and a research team at the Mexican Health Foundation (Funsalud) conducted the first comprehensive accounting of public health in Mexico. “To everyone’s shock,” Frenk said, the data revealed that 52 percent of health expenditures in Mexico were paid privately, out of pocket, from household budgets. Most Mexicans back then, he added, believed that most health care was publicly funded. The Mexican Constitution of 1983 had guaranteed the right to health care for all. But it took national reform to make universal care a reality.‘Take it to heart’By 2010 about 17,000 women were being treated for breast cancer under Seguro Popular; they were assured diagnosis, radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and follow-up appointments.Care is no less robust for those diagnosed today, but gaps remain: access to centralized treatment centers, adequate pain management, and the palliative therapies needed by those who won’t survive.Those gaps are the worry and the passion of Harvard-trained health economist Felicia Knaul, Frenk’s wife and longtime research collaborator. Now an associate professor at Harvard Medical School, Knaul directs the Harvard Global Equity Initiative (HGEI), which links research with advocacy in developing nations. The project was co-founded by Sen — Knaul’s graduate school mentor — and Lincoln C. Chen, onetime director of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies.Knaul’s awakening to breast cancer was sudden and personal. In the spring of 2007, during a routine mammogram at a primary care clinic in Cuernavaca, Mexico, she learned she had the disease, and it was already far along. Knaul was 41, the mother of two young daughters. For the first two weeks after her diagnosis, she said, “I was upset, searching, angry, and denying treatment.”Reason and perspective returned. She underwent multiple surgeries that culminated in a mastectomy in a private hospital in Mexico City. A few days after the first surgery, Knaul went for a walk and marveled at her astonishing luck. She had health insurance, wonderful care, and support from a loving and knowledgeable husband.She also thought deeply about women who were not so fortunate.“Cancer takes away,” Knaul would write years later, in her 2012 book “Beauty without the Breast,” “but it also gives.”Early in her fight, on long walks, Knaul had started to imagine another woman with breast cancer. She too was a young mother. But she was poor. She was being treated in one of Mexico’s crowded public hospitals — settings that not long ago were simply “places to go and die,” said Knaul.The woman was alone, deserted by her partner in a culture that often stigmatizes women with breast cancer. Money had run out for bus fares, treatments, and medicine. Facing financial ruin, she had no choice but to quit going to appointments. (Breast cancer treatment can take up to a year, and involve an agonizing trilogy of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.)Worst of all, thought Knaul, as this woman lay dying, she was dying in pain.Only one in 10 cases of breast cancer in Mexico is detected early, during Stage 1, when treatment is most likely to be successful. Few poor women ever get mammograms; four out of five do not have annual clinical breast exams.What is more, despite Seguro Popular’s successes, access to treatment remains difficult for many since it often requires extensive travel. “We still have the women moving, instead of the care moving,” said Knaul. To mitigate this problem, she is working with Mexico’s Ministry of Health to learn a lesson from the Harvard-affiliated Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, which has set up satellite clinics for breast-cancer treatment throughout New England.Another major issue is pain management, which is not available for most poor women in Mexico and in most of the developing world. It is a gap in care that “shocked and horrified” Knaul — and which was outlined in a recent Human Rights Watch report on palliative care in Mexico.Also lacking is professional education. Many primary care providers in Mexico, said Knaul, are not fully aware of the disease or its prevalence, in part because the data on breast cancer are “so new and surprising.” Many women go to their doctors worried about a lump in the breast, and are sent home with an antibiotic. Many primary care physicians, she said, “think you’re terribly mistaken,” especially if the patient is young. They believe breast cancer strikes only older women, rich women, and women from other countries.Education is the counterweight and will guide practitioners, said Knaul. “We have to share the right data.”Beginning in 2008, Knaul underwent postsurgical chemotherapy treatments, a painful ordeal that evoked the same powerful tugs of empathy. During those moments Knaul created the idea of Cáncer de Mama: Tómatelo a Pecho, a nonprofit launched to educate poor women about breast cancer. The name means “Breast Cancer: Take It to Heart” — that is, take it seriously.A hub for careThe new wing at Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, just a few blocks from where Knaul was treated in 2007, is state-of-the-art. One day last fall a young medical student in a lab coat paused to talk. The hospital’s new building, he said, is “seven floors of full attention.”In the main waiting area, where a crucifix hangs on each wall, a social worker reads names from a clipboard. Many of the patients, more women than men, wear surgical masks. When patients are called, they file into a secondary waiting room.Guadalupe Leticia de Garte Sosa, a breast cancer patient in her 40s, remembered how aggressively the disease attacked. “I couldn’t believe it could happen in such a short time.” The first sign was in a nipple, “so monstrous I couldn’t believe it,” she said.Around her, the waiting room was crowded. Every chair was taken. This was a sign that success — universal access — comes with a price. “The advantages of more having coverage for breast cancer has also had consequences,” said Héctor Arreola Ornelas, an HGEI scientific researcher and collaborator and economic research coordinator at the Mexican Health Foundation.A 17-year veteran of health-systems research, Arreola Ornelas lost his wife, a physician in her 30s, to breast cancer in 2006.Centers such as INCan, he said, are typically in large cities. Trips for appointments can be expensive and often require a companion and a place to stay.For Sosa, home was an eight-hour bus ride from INCan — impossible during a treatment cycle. But a stranger she had met in a restaurant was letting her sleep over in Mexico City. “I had the good fortune of finding a person.”In a corridor nearby, Marta Berta Cerqueda Quiroga waited on a metal folding chair for her chemotherapy session, her head wrapped in a bandana. Having to relocate for her long course of treatment had been its own ordeal. “I am here with a nephew. It’s uncomfortable,” she said, since the nephew’s new wife, “shouts at me while giving me food.”Months earlier, Quiroga recounted in Spanish, she had resisted the idea that she had cancer at all. Standing up from the chair, she mimed the argument she had had with her doctor. Sitting back down, she wept.Young and determinedFor now, Abish Guillermina Romero Juarez is past tears. A cancer survivor still in her 20s, she is a master’s degree student at the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico in Cuernavaca, a school Frenk helped found less than a decade ago.More than half the women diagnosed with breast cancer in Mexico are in their premenopausal years, when the disease is most aggressive. “We don’t have a full explanation for this,” said Knaul. The same trends, she added, are taking hold all across Latin America and the Caribbean.Juarez’s mother died from breast cancer in 2010, just as her daughter was finishing her university studies in Mexico City. Juarez moved to Boston to work as an au pair — but the next spring was diagnosed with breast cancer herself. When her U.S. insurance would not cover care, she reached out to Knaul, who had an immediate solution: Get on a plane, you will be covered in Mexico.Back home, it took Juarez just an hour to register with Seguro Popular. The plan’s Fund for Protection against Catastrophic Health Expenditure covered her care. It’s a separate and untouchable fund, segregated by law from the Ministry of Health’s regular budget, which is subject to periodic erosion.Laura Torres, a law student, was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 24. Unlike the impoverished woman Knaul had imagined, Torres had a place to stay after her diagnosis: her parents’ house. She even had private health insurance. Her luck, however, failed to allay the terror and pain of the disease or the time she lost to it. “Being sick,” she said of the two-year ordeal, “is a full-time job.”Still, the experience left Torres with a new passion: saving poor patients from pain. “As a cancer patient, I know pain treatment is vital,” she said. “You can’t wake up from a mastectomy and take Tylenol. It’s a vital aspect of treatment, even if people are not facing a life-threatening condition.”Torres and others are working to change laws that Frenk called “antiquated” and that Knaul said are frozen in place partly because of concern over drug cartels.Last spring, HGEI organized “Closing the Pain Divide,” a two-day seminar at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Just before, Knaul had blogged on the issue for the Huffington Post. She quoted World Health Organization estimates that every year 5.5 million terminal cancer patients die in pain — and that four of five people live in countries with limited access to prescribed opioids.“No one should die in the torture of pain when the drugs to stop that pain are available and so affordable,” Knaul wrote, remembering her father’s death from cancer when she was 18. “Denial of access to pain medication is a form of torture.”HGEI has established a palliative-care institute in Guadalajara. In the fall, the group launched the HGEI-Lancet Commission on Global Access to Pain Control and Palliative Care, whose co-director, with Knaul, is Paul Farmer, the Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine. Meanwhile, Knaul is drafting a national policy for access to palliative care in Mexico.The global inequity of access to pain management is also a core issue with the researchers and public health experts of the future. Mexico native Thalia Porteny, S.M. ’14, who has worked with Knaul and is doing a Ph.D. in health policy at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, is a co-founder of the Young Leaders Network for Health Equity. With about 21 active members from 10 countries, the group is developing ways for young researchers from low- and middle-income countries to collaborate on common issues. “We’re trying to build momentum,” she said, with global universal care as the ultimate goal.Mexico has at least “achieved a milestone” toward such coverage through Seguro Popular, she said. “All countries are on the path, but to really have it is something really difficult to attain.”Mexico as a modelFor Frenk, Knaul, and others at Harvard, Mexico provides a working example of how affordable comprehensive health care is possible for those who could never afford it on their own.The example is not perfect. Out-of-pocket expenditures persist, and there are bottlenecks in some specialized areas of care, like radiology. Access in rural areas remains problematic.But the Mexican case, supported and studied so widely at Harvard, also shows the potential for government action in health care — a blueprint for separating health care from the labor market. Such a “decoupling,” as Frenk puts it, ensures that those who don’t earn a salary — farmers, the self-employed, homemakers, the elderly — are protected from the financial shocks of illness.There’s also an opening for helping citizens stay well — 20 percent of Seguro Popular funding goes to prevention, through measures such as vaccines and routine health screenings. (This is another protected fund, and includes epidemiological surveillance based on techniques developed at Harvard.) Markers of public health have improved in the decade since Seguro Popular was launched. Life expectancy is up, and rates of both maternal and child mortality are down. Among illnesses causing the highest rates of hospitalization, more than 95 percent are now covered.“It tries to fund the whole circle,” Frenk said of Seguro Popular, from prevention, diagnosis, and treatment to palliative care. In turn, he added, concentrated efforts — against breast cancer, for example — display an “external positive effect”: Single improvements in a system drive general improvements. More community health care workers, in this case, and more radiological services and improved surgical platforms can help against a range of illnesses.Seguro Popular is not a direct template for change in every country in search of universal health care, Frenk said. “It’s not a question of adopting, but adapting.” Mexico’s plan came from studying health systems all over the world for 20 years. The best lessons were the negative ones, he said; knowing what doesn’t work means you don’t have to try it again.Finally, Harvard and Mexican health authorities are at the center of an experiment in collaboration that could go global. It’s designed to create, said Frenk, “a mechanism for shared learning across countries.”last_img read more


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first_imgAlumni can vote this spring for a new group of Harvard Overseers and Harvard Alumni Association (HAA) elected directors.Ballots will be sent no later than April 1. Completed ballots must be received by 5 p.m. E.D.T. on May 21 to be counted. All holders of Harvard degrees, except Corporation members and officers of instruction and government at Harvard, are entitled to vote for Overseer candidates. The election for HAA directors is open to all Harvard degree holders.Candidates for Overseer may also be nominated by petition. Eligible voters may go to elections.harvard.edu for more information. The deadline for all petitions is Feb. 1.The HAA Nominating Committee has proposed the following candidates in 2019:For Overseer:Danguole Spakevicius Altman ’81, magna cum laudeFounder, Vapogenix Inc.Houston, TexasAlice Hm Chen, M.P.H. ’01Chief Medical Officer and Deputy Director, San Francisco Health NetworkBerkeley, Calif.Scott C. Collins ’87 magna cum laude, J.D. ’90 cum laudeManaging Director and Chief Operating Officer, Summit PartnersBostonJanet Echelman ’87 magna cum laudeVisual Artist, Studio EchelmanBrookline, Mass.Vivian Hunt, DBE, ’89 cum laude, M.B.A. ’95Managing Partner, U.K. and Ireland, McKinsey & Company, Inc.London, England Tyler Jacks ’83 magna cum laudeDirector, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridge, Mass.John B. King Jr. ’96 (’95) magna cum laudePresident and Chief Executive Officer, The Education TrustWashington, D.C.Reshma Saujani, M.P.P. ’99Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Girls Who CodeNew York, N.Y.Ryan Wise, Ed.L.D. ’13Director, Iowa Department of EducationDes Moines, IowaFor Elected Director:George C. Alex ’81 cum laudeChief Executive Officer, Twin Oaks CapitalCohasset, Mass.Bryan C. Barnhill II ’08City Manager of the City Solutions Group, Ford Smart MobilityDetroit, Mich.Ethel Billie Branch ’01 cum laude, J.D. ’08, M.P.P. ’08Attorney General, The Navajo NationWindow Rock, Ariz. Salomé Cisnal de Ugarte, L.L.M. ’94Managing Partner, Hogan LovellsBrussels, Belgium Adrienne E. Dominguez ’90 cum laudePartner, Intellectual Property, Thompson & Knight LLPDallas, TexasMichael J. Gaw ’90 magna cum laudeAssistant Director, Division of Trading and Markets, U.S. Securities and Exchange CommissionAlexandria, Va.Christina Lewis ’02 cum laudeFounder and Chief Executive Officer, All Star CodeNew York, N.Y.Zandile H. Moyo ’00 cum laudeConsultant, Strategy & Financial Advisory ServicesIndian Springs, Ala. Derek C.M. van Bever, M.B.A. ’88, M.Div. ’11Senior Lecturer and Director of the Forum for Growth & Innovation, Harvard Business SchoolCambridge, Mass.The HAA nominating committee has nominated nine candidates for Overseer rather than the usual eight. That reflects an additional vacancy created by the departure of James Hildreth, who stepped down because of other professional obligations.last_img read more


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first_imgPeople on campus may see men wearing less clothes than a normal South Bend February day would typically require and holding out Solo cups with a request for money Wednesday. If so, they should not be alarmed — it’s just Siegfried Hall’s signature event, Day of Man, in full force.As it is the 13th year for the event, Siegfried has the basics down for the Day of Man: wear skimpy clothes — most often their bright event t-shirts, shorts and flip-flops — to class and around campus all day and ask for donations that will go to the South Bend Center for the Homeless. Observer file photo According to sophomore Kieran Wurl, one of four event commissioners, the Day of Man first originated when a Siegfried resident forgot his coat one cold winter day, and realized others less fortunate than he dealt with the cold in this fashion every day. “He realized that there are people in the South Bend community that are homeless and go through it every day, fighting the South Bend cold wind. So he gathered a group of his friends, went out and started asking for money for donations for the homeless and then it kind of turned into a Siegfried tradition from then on,” Wurl said. Wurl said members of Siegfried will collect money in-person all day Wednesday, as well as through a Venmo account — @DayOfMan2019. Each section in the dorm will take shifts at both dining halls during high traffic times, and will also be outside of DeBartolo Hall in the morning. While the temperature for this year’s event will be above freezing — around 40 degrees — Wurl hopes it will go down some. “The standard is flip-flops, shorts and a t-shirt, but people can go over or under that … we want to just try to actually put yourself in the shoes of a homeless person to experience what they might be feeling,” Wurl said. Apart from its signature event, Siegfried maintains a relationship with the South Bend Center for the Homeless and tries to help the center and its residents whenever possible. Patrick Davis, a senior commissioner for the event, said a couple dorm members help out at the shelter every weekend, and the dorm has worked with the clothing company Patagonia to donate coats. “It goes beyond just the day itself and more has to do with Siegfried’s relationship with the Center for the Homeless,” Davis said. “We send a couple of kids every weekend to the Center every weekend to help out with whatever they need — cleaning up, organizing clothes, food or just sitting and talking with the residents. … We want people to see another side of South Bend that not many Notre Dame students have seen.”Over the years, Siegfried has raised a combined total of about $130,000 in donations, and $18,000 last year alone. According to Wurl, the hall’s goal for this year is to reach — and potentially break — the $20,000 mark. “We’re just hoping that members of the Notre Dame community will feel generous,” Wurl said. “I know it’s going to be warmer this week than last week,” Davis said. “But I’m sure everyone can remember what it was like to be outside last week, and imagine what it would be like to be stuck outside for longer than a few minutes.” Davis and Wurl mentioned the steps South Bend has taken in the last week in light of the extremely cold weather to open their doors to anyone in need, and touched on the homeless issue the entire country faces. “There’s several hundred people who depend on the Homeless Center. … Kids, women, children and families are depending on the Homeless Center for their meals, and in situations like last week with staying overnight on days where it’s very cold,” Wurl said. “So there’s really a need for it in the South Bend community, but honestly all over the United States it’s also a problem.”Tags: dorm events, philanthropy, Siegfried Hall Day of Man, South Bend Center for the Homelesslast_img read more


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first_imgUniversity of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists will be among the organic agriculture experts presenting at the 2014 Georgia Organics Conference set for Feb. 21 – 22 on Jekyll Island, Ga.This year’s conference, Green Acres – Saving the Plant one Bite at a Time, focuses on agriculture’s impact on the environment and how organic farming restores natural resources. The two-day conference, presented annually by Georgia Organics, is one of the largest sustainable agriculture expos in The South. More than 1,000 farmers, gardeners, health advocates, backyard gardeners and organic food lovers are expected.Friday, the first day of the conference, includes a choice of several farm tours in Georgia and Florida as well as in-depth workshops. Saturday begins with a day-full of educational sessions followed by a keynote address from Ken Cook, president and cofounder of the Environmental Working Group. Cook is frequently cited by national media outlets as an expert on environmental issues. Saturday concludes with the conference’s highlight – the Farmers Feast. As always, the farmers feast menu will feature local, organically produced food prepared by talented chefs.UGA horticulturist David Berle will lead an in-depth workshop on how to grow organically in raised beds. The session will cover selecting a site and building and filling the beds under National Organic Program standards. A second follow-up session led by Berle will take participants to nearby St. Simons Island for a hands-on workshop on raised beds. The session’s 20 participants will install a permanent bed at Oglethorpe Point Elementary School.Georgia’s unpredictable climate will be the focus of UGA climatologist Pam Knox’s educational session. Knox will reveal how climate change affects Georgia’s agricultural industry and food prices. Carrie Furman of UGA and the Southeast Climate Consortium will explain how strong local food communities can help farmers adapt to climate change.A team of UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences horticulturists and plant pathologists will discuss how cover crops can be used when growing cool-season crops. Cover crops are typically fall crops that are planted to recharge garden plots for the following season’s summer crops.Conference workshop and session presenters will also include faculty from Auburn University, Clemson University, Ft. Valley State University, Oxford College – Emory University, University of Florida and Virginia State University. Numerous organic farmers will present, as will experts from the Georgia Department of Agriculture and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.For more on the conference and how to register, see the website www.georgiaorganics.org/conference. The early registration deadline is Jan. 5, 2014. Participants who volunteer for four hours or more receive a 22 percent registration discount.last_img read more


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first_img In the particular case of the FAB, the operation center will be at the Aerial Operations Command, headquartered in Brasília, where Super Tucano airplanes (A-29), F 5EM fighters, radar airplanes, UAVs and helicopters are available. By Dialogo May 23, 2013 On May 18, the Brazilian Military started Operation Ágata 7 along the entire Brazilian border, which includes ten South American countries. By employing 25,000 Soldiers, and the participation of Federal Police agents, Highway Patrol, Military Police and government agencies, this edition is the largest deployment ever performed by the Brazilian government. The operation is designed to support the fight against crime between Oiapoque, in the northern state of Amapa, and Chi, in the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul. Operation Ágata 7 occurs on the eve of the Confederations Cup, a soccer tournament hosted in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Fortaleza, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, and Salvador. Due to this event, the Ministry of Defense opted for a mobilization that would cover the 10,492 miles of national border versus actions that occurred only on portions of the border between Brazil and the South American countries in prior editions. As the operation unfolds throughout the entire land border, the troops will have centers built at the western and southern Amazon Military Commands, where the Navy, Army and Air Force will serve. However, the three branches will utilize work force and equipment from military organizations and can count on reinforcements from other regions. The Ministry of Defense has performed six editions of Operation Ágata through the Armed Forces Joint Staff for almost two years. The boundary zone is 93 miles from the border, representing 27% of the national territory that includes 710 municipalities, 122 of which are border areas. The Navy will use river patrol boats, UH-12 helicopters, hospital ships and speedboats. The Army will use aircraft, as well as armored and light vehicles for the transportation of the troops, and the land force will setup operations in strategic locations on the Brazilian border to block the highways. Besides combating illicit activities, Operation Ágata also unfolds civic actions such as medical, dental, and hospital services in areas where underprivileged families are located. According to the integrated balance, the prior six editions of Operation Ágata have resulted in 59,717 procedures, from which 18,304 were medical and 29,482 were dental services. Approximately 9,000 people received vaccinations and 195,241 medications were distributed. The Border Plan directed the operation, which was created by presidential decree in June 2011. Currently, 12 ministries, 20 government agencies and institutions from the 11 border states are taking part in Operation Ágata. During the deployment, the troops will be on the lookout for major cross-border crimes such as drug trafficking, contraband and embezzlement, weapons and ammunition trafficking, environmental crimes, vehicle smuggling, illegal immigration and mining. Before beginning the operation, the government was in contact with neighboring countries to transfer information regarding the use of the military. While Operation Ágata is part of the national Strategic Border Plan coordinated by the Ministry of Defense and the Armed Forces Joint Staff, its execution is the responsibility of the Brazilian Navy, Army, and Air Force (FAB). last_img read more


Category: fcpccnpg

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Next Tuesday, thanks to the New York State Federation of Republican Women, a grassroots group based in Nassau, folks can listen to Dick Morris, the triangulating political mastermind and Fox News Channel commentator, promote the latest book he’s written with his wife Eileen McGann.Packed with provocative buzzwords, the title is “Revolt!—How to Defeat Obama and Repeal His Socialist Agenda—A Patriot’s Guide.” Even though his presentation is called “Winning the Presidential Election,” it’s safe to say that Morris is not peddling free advice so Hillary Clinton can occupy the White House again, although he doesn’t mind getting credit for providing the strategy that engineered President Bill Clinton’s re-election in 1996 when it looked a little hopeless.Morris must know his audience pretty well, because it takes a lot of balls to profit from calling President Obama’s agenda socialist with a straight face. But for this crowd, they’ll probably buy it. They certainly aren’t paying any mind to a real Democratic socialist, Sen. Bernie Sanders, who could only wish that Obama and, for that matter, his party’s leading rival for the nomination, Hillary Clinton, really were more to the left, especially about reining in Wall Street power and the cancerous concentration of wealth in this country.There’s a lot going on in the months leading up to the next election, and it’s neither enlightening nor encouraging—at least if you care about facts. The reality is that the extremists in the GOP base eat this stuff up. According to the polls, Donald “Something Terrific” Trump is still the front-leader of the GOP field, and that’s got a growing number of people concerned, and some of them are even Republicans.A recent cartoon by the Pulitzer Prize-winner Tom Toles in the Washington Post, featuring a conversation between a pair of elephants in business suits, spells out the conundrum facing the party of Lincoln: “We’ve got a Trump problem,” says one. “He’s appealing to voters who are responding to racism bordering on fascism. It’s a real dilemma. How do we get rid of Trump but keep those voters?”Conservative Michael Gerson, President George W. Bush’s speechwriter and policy advisor, spelled it out much further in a recent column about the 2016 race: “The presidential candidate who has consistently led the Republican field for four months, Donald Trump, has proposed: to forcibly expel 11 million people from the country, requiring a massive apparatus of enforcement, courts and concentration camps; to rewrite or reinterpret the 14th Amendment to end the Civil War-era Republican principle of birthright citizenship; to build a 2,000-mile wall on our southern border while forcing Mexico to pay the cost. He has characterized undocumented Mexican immigrants as rapists and murderers, and opposed the speaking of Spanish in the United States.”Most of Trump’s appeal is “reactionary,” writes Gerson, before quoting the billionaire himself: “‘We’re going to have to do things,’ says Trump with menacing vagueness, ‘that we never did before.’ And if disrespect for institutions is common, Trump is its perfect vehicle — combining the snark of Twitter with the staged anger and grudges of reality television… Is it possible and morally permissible, for economic and foreign policy conservatives, and for Republicans motivated by their faith, to share a coalition with the advocates of an increasingly raw and repugnant nativism?”He’s right, but his words probably fall on the deaf ears of those who get their views from Fox News. After all, Trump has just lied that the U.S. is going to take in 250,000 Syrian refugees, that African-Americans are responsible for most white homicides (total falsehood), and, most outrageous, that on Sept. 11, 2001 he saw on television “thousands and thousands” of people in some unnamed “Arab” neighborhood of New Jersey “cheering as that building was coming down.” Not even Gov. Chris Christie, who knows a thing or two about New Jersey, could back him up on that big whopper. But it didn’t matter, because he just doubled-down and his supporters ate it up.Recently a front-page photo taken at a Trump rally in Birmingham, Alabama, showed a group of haggard-looking white people sitting in the front row, holding placards proclaiming “the silent majority stands with Trump.” Take away their red, white and blue signs and they could have passed for hard-luck people in the Depression, perhaps gathered to hear the Louisiana Sen. Huey “Kingfish” Long, on the stump for his “Share Our Wealth” campaign.A populist Democrat with a demagogic streak, Long was a constant thorn in the left side of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, whom the Kingfish called a mama’s boy. He dubbed Congress “the Rich Men’s Club” when he gave a speech in 1932 on the Senate floor he titled “the Doom of the American Dream.” At one point he says, “There is a mere candle flicker here and yonder to take the place of what the great dream of America was supposed to be.” His plan would have imposed a $5 million tax cap on a family’s wealth, a $1 million a year salary cap, and a reliance on “men with the smartest minds” in America to flesh out the details.“Unless we provide for the redistribution of wealth in this country, the country is doomed,” he said, citing a study by the Federal Trade Commission that “1 percent” owned “59 percent” of the wealth. His figures almost sound quaint today, but he was deadly serious. He railed against both the Democratic Party and the Republican Party, saying that “nothing can be squeezed through these party organizations that goes far enough to bring the American people to a condition where they have such a thing as a liveable country.”On the stump, Trump boasts about his business ability that has made him, the son of a millionaire, a purported billionaire. Nothing he’s proposed so far will actually improve the lives of the poor middle class men and women flocking to hear him. Behind him lurk Charles and David Koch, petrochemical billionaires (in Long’s day he railed against Standard Oil executives), who have pledged to spend almost a billion dollars on the 2016 elections to bring the Republican Party to the White House, and cement their hold on the Senate and the House of Representatives—as the brothers have already done with helping to put a majority of the state houses across the land in Republican hands.By 1935, Huey Long’s Share Our Wealth organization was collecting tens of thousands of letters a week from people all across the country who didn’t believe that FDR and the Democrats were doing enough to save them from despair, let alone improve their daily lives. As the 1936 election approached, FDR’s supporters feared that Long would challenge him for the nomination.But Long was playing a different game. He told his closest advisors that he was going to sit it out, perhaps put up a third party candidate who’d siphon enough votes from Roosevelt so that the Republican candidate would win. It was a cynical strategy, as T. Harry Williams noted in his Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of the Kingfish, because Long knew that a Republican president would only make the Depression worse—but that would pave the way in 1940 for a savior to come along like Huey Long, who’d promised to “make every man a king.”Today, when you look at the forlorn faces of Trump’s Republican supporters beyond the beltway, you wonder what they think when they listen to their candidate speak. In his mind, he’s already on the throne. But he’ll never share the crown.(Photo credit: Gage Skidmore)last_img read more