Category: tgrcpupz

Category: tgrcpupz

first_img whatsapp Share whatsapp KCS-content Wednesday 19 January 2011 7:07 pm AMERICAN International Group (AIG) has chosen Bank of America, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase to manage the sale of the government’s 92 per cent stake in the insurer, according to reports.AIG and the government held a “bake off” in New York last Thursday, hosting chief executives and bankers from 10 of the world’s largest firms to pitch for the right to manage the deal.JPMorgan and Bank of America were two of the three joint lead arrangers on AIG’s $4.3bn (£2.7bn) bank credit lines, while Goldman and AIG have a long-standing relationship. The Deutsche Bank connection is less clear, although AIG is expected to pitch investors aggressively for a large, global shareholder base.The winning banks are expected to split a fee that is less than the 75 basis points of the offering value the government paid last year for the initial public offering (IPO) of General Motors. Reports say the fee could be closer to 50 basis points.That is significantly less than the usual fee for a secondary offering of this size, although the banks are expected to make up for the lost revenue with the prestige of managing a marquee deal and the chance at future AIG business. AIG’s selection of banks to manage its share sale left out Citigroup and Morgan Stanley. Citigroup has been a restructuring adviser for AIG and was also one of the joint lead arrangers of a $4.3bn bank credit lines to the insurer. Morgan Stanley has advised the government since the insurer’s near collapse in September 2008.But both banks are likely to be among the four to eight joint bookrunners to be brought in closer to the offering, a source said yesterday. center_img More From Our Partners Florida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.com by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldSenior Living | Search AdsNew Senior Apartments Coming Nearby Scottsdale (Take a Look at The Prices)Senior Living | Search Ads AIG picks banks for share sale Tags: NULL Show Comments ▼last_img read more


Category: tgrcpupz

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN COVID-19, Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Health & Healthcare Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Constance and the other martyrs of Memphis are remembered as part of a larger window in All Saints’ Chapel at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. Sister Hughetta, the only nun to survive the yellow fever epidemic, moved to Sewanee, and in 1888, she and other sisters started what is now the Southern Province of the Sisters of St. Mary. Photo: University of the SouthEditor’s note: A previous version of this story included a photo that incorrectly identified the woman shown as Constance. The woman was Mother Harriet Stone Cannon who founded the order in 1865.[Episcopal News Service] The martyrdom of Constance and her five companions, who died within a month of each other while ministering to residents of Memphis, Tennessee, amid the 1878 yellow fever epidemic, has always inspired the ministry of St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral.The Rev. Laura Gettys, the Memphis cathedral’s interim dean, told Episcopal News Service that the question is how to continue to live out the story and not leave it on the shelf as a legend from the past. She said that is especially true now as the COVID-19 pandemic inspires members of the cathedral but restrictions on movement challenge their ministries.“On the days when I particularly feel overwhelmed, I’m mindful of what they did. They showed up and were faithful and were present to those who needed them the most. They were there for prayer, for love, for compassion, and many times for medical care,” Gettys said.The Rev. Tobias Stanislas Haller wrote this icon of Constance and her companions in 1999 originally for the Brotherhood of St. Gregory’s Fessenden Recovery Ministry in Yonkers, New York. The icon was later given to St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral. Photo: Tobias Stanislas HallerThe legacy of the “Martyrs of Memphis,” as they are known, “is both gift and challenge,” she said. “It is in every fiber of who we are and what we are about.” Episcopalians at the cathedral have followed the martyrs’ example by growing into a hub of worship and services for the community, Gettys said, concentrating on companionship and inequities in housing and medical care.The yellow fever epidemic of 1878 began in New Orleans, spread up the Mississippi River and moved inland. An estimated 120,000 people contracted the hemorrhagic fever, and 13,000 to 20,000 died.The martyrs’ story is a harrowing one of people dying in streets and parks, as others were found “insensible without attendants,” according to a historical account compiled the following year.It begins in 1873 when Episcopal nuns from the Community of St. Mary in New York, including eventual martyrs Constance and Thelca, came to Memphis after Tennessee Bishop Charles T. Quintard asked New York Bishop Horatio Potter to send some sisters to found a school in Memphis. They soon encountered a yellow fever epidemic, and the teachers began nursing sick Memphians. It was the first of three yellow fever outbreaks in the city over 10 years.Five years later, after the end of the school year, Constance and Thelca were resting at the order’s mother house in Peekskill, New York, when they received news on Aug. 5 that the fever had struck Memphis a second time. While residents with means, about 30,000, were fleeing the city, the sisters prepared to return. They arranged for money and supplies to be sent ahead to Memphis. When they arrived on Aug. 20, they found the cathedral neighborhood to be the city’s most infected area. Plans had been made for the nuns to attend to the city’s sick during the day and to sleep in the country every night for safety.“We cannot listen to such a plan; it would never do; we are going to nurse day and night; we must be at our post,” one wrote.The nuns and priests moved among the estimated 20,000 Memphians who remained in the city. They comforted the dying, tried to help the sick and took in many orphans. The Rev. Charles Carroll Parsons, the rector of Grace Episcopal Church in Memphis, who wrote to Quintard five days before dying, called the sisters the “brave, unshrinking daughters of a Divine Love.”In September and early October of 1878, yellow fever decimated the city and the group working out of the cathedral. Parsons, a former U.S. Army artillery commander who defended Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer at his 1867 court-martial, died on Sept. 6. Three days later Constance, superior of the work at Memphis and headmistress of the school, died. She was 33. Thecla, cathedral and school chapel sacristan who also taught music and English and Latin grammar, died Sept. 12. Sister Ruth, a nurse from Trinity Infirmary in New York who came to help, and the Rev. Louis S. Schuyler, newly ordained assistant rector at Parsons’ prior parish, Church of the Holy Innocents, Hoboken, New Jersey, both died Sept. 17. Sister Frances, a newly professed nun given charge of the order’s Church Home orphanage, died Oct. 4.All six are buried near each other in the city’s historic Elmwood Cemetery, one of the South’s first rural cemeteries. The high altar at St. Mary’s, consecrated on Pentecost 1879, memorializes the sisters. The steps are inscribed with “Alleluia Osanna,” Constance’s last words.These days, Gettys said, she is “thinking about our call, not to martyrdom but to be present to one another and to the community and to the Way of Love, and that is exactly what the sisters were doing.”“It did end, for many, in martyrdom, but their call was not to that. It was to one another and to the neighborhood and those particularly who did not have the privilege and means to leave the city.”Today, Episcopalians at the cathedral remain in the city, but a shelter-in-place order has changed their ministries. The most prominent example is the Wednesday morning Eucharist in Sisters’ Chapel and breakfast, supplemented by music and access to social services, for 150 to 175 community members in Martyrs Hall. The ministry is open to all but is focused on poor people, many of whom are homeless.With none of the regular volunteers available, Gettys and the Rev. Patrick Williams, the cathedral’s canon pastor, have turned the morning into an “abbreviated and less-crowded” gathering that includes a prayer, a to-go sack meal and information about the few resources and agencies that are still available.One of those agencies, and a long-time partner with the cathedral, is the nearby Constance Abbey, an intentional community of Episcopalians that serves the vulnerable in the Memphis Medical District neighborhood surrounding the cathedral. Because the cathedral is surrounded by a number of hospitals, health care workers and medical students often come to the church to pray, and the cathedral often stages health fairs in a nearby park.The four sisters of the Community of St. Mary who died within days of each other while nursing other Memphians in the 1878 yellow fever epidemic are buried in the city’s Elmwood Cemetery. Photo: Historic-Memphis.comThe Episcopal Church will commemorate Constance and her companions on Sept. 9, as it has since 1985 when the General Convention added the martyrs to its calendar of commemorations. Depending on the status of COVID-19, St. Mary’s will have some version of its annual “Martyrs Weekend” celebration, Gettys said. Normally, there is a Lessons and Carols-type service featuring readings from the martyrs’ letters and diaries with music. There is also a service at Elmwood Cemetery followed by a picnic. A member of the Community of St. Mary in Sewanee, Tennessee, often comes for the celebration, bringing with her the chalice that was used at Eucharist during the epidemic.Others across the church have been considering the resonance of the martyrs’ story in these days of COVID-19. The Rev. Julia M. Gatta, the Bishop Frank A. Juhan professor of pastoral theology at the School of Theology in Sewanee, told ENS she sees parallels between the heroism of Constance and her companions and today’s essential workers. Those workers, in hospitals or grocery stores, are trying to help their communities survive. She especially pointed to retired health care workers who have come out of retirement to volunteer despite their age and increased vulnerability.There are differences, too. While the priests in Memphis felt obligated to bring the Last Rites to people during the yellow fever epidemic, Gatta said clergy today are discouraged from doing so in person, so as not to become an unwitting coronavirus carrier. “It makes it painful for clergy to not be able to minister to their own people who are dying, who are sick,” she said.Gatta teaches pastoral theology, including ministry to the sick and dying, and tells her students they must “act responsibly.” They must obey medical protocols, even if those measures seem to create a degree of separation from their congregants. However, she also speaks about Constance and her companions, telling future priests that sometimes they will have to take risks in order to minister to the sick. Those risks, however, must not be “crazy risks, ones that can have risks beyond ourselves but to other people as well.”There is another kind of risk these days, Gatta said. “Besides the grace of heroism, people need to be aware of the peculiar temptations right now, especially around desolation, to become closed in on themselves, to become embittered, to become despairing,” she said. “There are particular temptations that go with this moment as well, and they require vigilance.”Meanwhile, Anna Fitch Courie, who championed Constance and her companions in the 2016 edition of Lent Madness has been thinking about the different ways people are called.“We all have very different, profound callings in our lives that don’t necessarily mean you have to be on the front lines putting cool cloths on those with COVID-19,” she said. “But you are called, and you are called to listen to where God is sending you messages and whispering to you in your life.”Some people are on the front lines, and some are called to pray for them. Some can sew masks, and some can buy the material for those masks, she said. Fitch Courie, who is a nurse but whose own health puts her in the high-risk category, told ENS that she knows that an ICU is not where she is called to be right now, even though that is where she used to nurse.“You have to come to this point in your spiritual life where you are very comfortable and secure that you are doing what you are called to do at that time,” she said.Constance trusted God’s call, Fitch Courie said, and was true to her name, which means constant presence, dependable, faithful. She shows what it looks like to live a life based on consistently praying and listening for and responding to God’s call.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg retired in July 2019 as senior editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 17, 2020 Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis ‘Martyrs of Memphis’ have lessons to teach those battling COVID-19 Episcopalians reflect on the selfless service of Constance and her companions during 1870s’ yellow fever epidemic Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more


Category: tgrcpupz

first_imgWednesday Nov 2, 2011 Namibian Jacques Burger’s big hit on Fijian Akapusi Qera Gloucester hosted Saracens in the Aviva Premiership on the weekend for what was one of those games jampacked with incident. Scuffles, great play, tweeting insults, and of course, some great hits. This one from Jacques Burger stood out as the best of them. The game started with a huff and a puff within the first minute as both sides were clearly up for it. It continued later on, with two players exchanging blows and being yellow carded. We’ll try get that posted for you soon, quite possibly via Facebook and Twitter, so make sure you’re following. This bit we’ve chosen to feature here though is a great tackle from Nambian captain Jacques Burger, who yet again had a fantastic World Cup. He led his side admirably, following on from his typically courageus performances at the 2007 tournament in France.He played for the Bulls in South Africa, then was later signed up by Saracens. In New Zealand he made 64 tackles as his side conceded 266 points in their four matches. Having come from a farming background, the man is a workhorse, and he has the scars to prove it.He would walk into many international sides, and was named as one of the top five outstanding performers at the RWC. He’s a great example of a smalltown guy coming good through a lot of hard work and inspirational play. This tackle on Gloucester’s Fijian flanker Akapusi Qera was typical of the man, and made for good viewing too. ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Big Hits & Dirty Play Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO Suspensions handed down after testicle grabbing… 26 WEEKS AGO The ‘double ruffle’ splits opinion with fans… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: The nastiest and most brutal moments… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingDoctors Stunned: This Removes Wrinkles Like Crazy! (Try Tonight)Smart Life Reports30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyShe Was the Most Beautiful Girl in the World. What She Looks Like Now is InsaneNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more


Category: tgrcpupz

first_img Save this picture!Recommended ProductsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesRodecaRound Facade at Omnisport Arena ApeldoornWoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadeFiber Cements / CementsRieder GroupFacade Panels – concrete skinText description provided by the architects. These two houses -actually there´s only one built- recall the houses of tenant farmers in the Chilean countryside: the existing walnut trees haven´t been touched, the outside has been denied thanks to a whitewashed perimetral wall. Save this picture!Save this picture!Save this picture!An inner courtyard with the possibility of being covered with an agricultural tarpaulin fixed to its wall to provide shade, an austere living room with bits of an exterior spread throughout the courtyard, a roof of painted untreated wood and bedrooms painted in bold colours.Save this picture!Project gallerySee allShow lessTanishq retail store / Pompei A.DSelected ProjectsHalftecture O / Shuhei EndoSelected Projects Share ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/10455/chilean-house-smiljan-radic Clipboard Chilean House / Smiljan Radic Save this picture!+ 27 Share Year:  CopyHouses•Chile ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/10455/chilean-house-smiljan-radic Clipboard Projects CopyAbout this officeSmiljan RadicOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHousesChilePublished on January 01, 2009Cite: “Chilean House / Smiljan Radic” 01 Jan 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Classic™ SeriesVinyl Walls3MArchitectural Finishes DI-NOC in Ned Ludd Public HouseShower ColumnshansgroheOverhead ShowersWindowsKalwall®Kalwall® in Featherstone High SchoolLightsLouis PoulsenLamps – LP Slim BoxSealantsEffisusBi-adhesive Tape – 2BondDSConcrete FloorsSikaIndustrial Floor CoatingsPlantersJakobGreen Walls – GreenKitUrban ApplicationsPunto DesignPunto Benches and Litter Bins in Public Space ImprovementsPaintKEIMMineral Paint for Concrete – KEIM Concretal®-WArmchairs / Couches / Futons / PoufsFreifrauArmchair High – MarlaAcousticBASWA acousticThermal-Acoustic System – BASWA CoreMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?智利住宅 / Smiljan Radic是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamcenter_img Area:  1600 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Chilean House / Smiljan RadicSave this projectSaveChilean House / Smiljan Radic Houses “COPY” “COPY” Architects: Smiljan Radic Area Area of this architecture project 2006 Chilelast_img read more


Category: tgrcpupz

first_imgMarketing consultant suggests ways of inflation-proofing donations and legacies  42 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. What can fundraisers do to reduce the impact of such inflation figures? Papworth suggests testing the idea of asking donors to choose to index their gifts to Treasury forecasts of the retail price index (RPI) given in the Chancellor’s budget for the year ahead when they sign their regular direct debit mandates.He cites the example of a charity attempting to achieve this result. The Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society recently raised members’ subscription direct debits by £1 per month unless they opted out of the increase. However, the charity received negative publicity in the press for the action. Guardian financial journalist Philip Inman claimed that the information about the rise was ‘buried’ on page two of the accompany leaflet.The WDCS however pointed out that they’d received only three complaints in a test mailing to 2,800 donors and added that the price rise was mentioned as a postscript in the appeal letter.Papworth suggests that a clear, genuine and transparent option for donors to tick to inflation-link their variable direct debits might just work.In another article he looks at how legacies can be affected by higher inflation rates. He suggests that more effort is made in educating legators to leave either residuary bequests or leaving a percentage of the estate. Both of these are better protected against inflationary erosion which can quite easily turn a specific sum of money into a fairly paltry sum when the charity eventually benefits years later.‘Harvest’ also includes Papworth’s critique of the new monday lottery from Chariot. He argues that the heavy bias towards charities concerned with diseases, disabilities or children negates the claim that the new lottery offers punters a real choice of beneficiaries.”Harvest’ is mailed free on request to charity marketers. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Can fundraisers do anything now to counter the effects of a future period of higher inflation? Marketing consultant Andrew Papworth shares a few ideas in the latest edition of his occasional newsletter ‘Harvest’.Papworth points out that, even with retail prices rising at around only 2% per annum, regular donations lose nearly 10% of their real value in five years. A period of higher inflation would erode that value even faster.Indeed, we don’t need a return to the double figure inflation figures of the 1970s and 1980s for it to hurt: the inflation rate has only to creep up to 4% per year to inflict an 18% drop in the value of fixed regular donations over five years. Advertisement Howard Lake | 18 May 2006 | News Tagged with: Individual givinglast_img read more


Category: tgrcpupz

first_img Preparing For Next Year While in This Year’s Combine Makes Sense By Andy Eubank – Sep 22, 2020 Audio Playerhttps://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2020/09/Plan-for-next-year-during-this-years-harvest.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Yields will be all over the board this year. We’ve heard that a lot in recent years and those are current year thoughts of Jeff Lakin, a technical agronomist in Jasper County with Channel Seeds.“Some of the early reports coming out of Lafayette and west area, very good corn yields coming out of that area,” he reported. “As we work north into some of the northern counties where we have higher sand concentrations that were impacted by droughts more, the yields are going to be significantly less I believe. It just depends on rainfall and who caught it and who didn’t.”Lakin says he is starting to see some hybrid specific issues with standability.“No catastrophic events at this time, but especially where we were water stressed the stalks are getting more fragile every day,” he told HAT. “We’re out with our seedsmen telling them to tell their customers to choose hybrids to get out of the fields quicker than others and make sure that we get the ones that have some susceptibility to stalk lodging issues out of the field sooner than later.”In addition to everything on the farmer’s mind while harvesting this year’s crop, it’s the perfect time to being laying the groundwork for the 2021 season. Lakin says growers in combines would be well-served to note the hybrids and varieties they like and don’t like.“The best time to make selections is when everything is fresh on your mind, the growing season is fresh on your mind. You’re running the combine through the crops and it’s the ideal time to make those selections based on what’s happening currently, what you remember through the growing season. We always have the ability to go and tweak orders later.”He adds, don’t overreact to yield results that were well below what you may have expected.“Consult with your Channel seedsman or me so you can get a broader picture of things, because just because they maybe saw a product fail in their local field doesn’t mean that it was that way across the board. It might have been an environmental thing that just caused product not to work this year, so we don’t want to make overreactions. We want to look at the big picture as well.” Previous articleAsian Import Ban on German Pork Could Fuel Growth for US PorkNext articleAsian Import Ban on German Pork Could Fuel Growth for US Pork on the HAT Wednesday Podcast Andy Eubank Home Indiana Agriculture News Preparing For Next Year While in This Year’s Combine Makes Sense SHARE SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitterlast_img read more


Category: tgrcpupz

first_imgNews RSF_en Twelve thousands copies of the independent daily Al-Oula were seized at a checkpoint at the entrance to the capital without any grounds being given. There were to have been distributed in the southern regions of Ibb, Taiz and Hodeidah. Help by sharing this informationcenter_img Organisation May 19, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Twelve thousands copies of the independent daily Al-Oula seizedlast_img


Category: tgrcpupz

first_imgNews News Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfire Two Pakistani journalists, Rab Nawaz Joya and Javed Kanwal Chandor, have been held since 10 November in a police station in Okara district, in the northeastern province of Punjab. Although charged with theft and fraud, they were arrested for helping Pakistani and international news media get background information about Ajmal Kasab, a participant in the November 2008 terrorist attacks in the Indian city of Mumbai.In the immediate aftermath of the attacks, the Pakistani government denied that Kasab was of Pakistani origin.“It is intolerable that two Pakistani journalists are being treated like criminals for helping to establish the truth about the only surviving member of the Mumbai attackers commando,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This information may have been embarrassing for the Pakistani authorities, but it is unacceptable that these two reporters are being held just for doing their duty as journalists.”The press freedom organisation added: “The absurd charges brought against them fail to conceal the real motive for their arrest. We call for them to be freed without delay and for all the charges to be dropped.”Joya, a correspondent for the Urdu-language newspaper Akhbar Al-Mashriq, and Chandor, a Dunya News TV reporter, are accused of trying to steal money and a mobile phone from a car parked outside the Depalpur Press Club, of which Joya is the president and Chandor is the secretary general. They are also accused of embezzling public funds.Lahore-based journalists who spoke to them in the police station where they are being held in very poor conditions quoted them as saying they were being punished for “helping national and international media know more about Ajmal Kasab” and for helping reporters to get to Faridkot, the village near Depalpur where Kasab is from.“Since then we are facing hostility from people in the security agencies and local administration,” the two journalists added. Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists June 2, 2021 Find out more News Receive email alerts Organisation RSF_en to go furthercenter_img PakistanAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information November 13, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two journalists held after helping media probe Mumbai attacker’s background PakistanAsia – Pacific April 21, 2021 Find out more Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder News Follow the news on Pakistan January 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more


Category: tgrcpupz

first_img LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Twitter School children evacuated from Derry leisure centre during security alert Facebook Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Facebook Previous article75 jobs finally coming on stream in Donegal TownNext articleACART hit back against calls for blood alcohol limit to be unchanged News Highland News A group of school children were among those evacuated from a Derry leisure centre today after a suspicious object was left.The children were in the swimming pool at the Templemore Sports Complex when for the second time in less than a week the building was evacuated.Last Thursday during the election count the building was evacuated for a time after a pipe bomb was placed in a hijacked taxi and abandoned in the car park of the centre.Derry City Councillor, Mark H Durkan, says those responsible for todays attack need to wise up.[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/markh.mp3[/podcast]center_img Twitter Google+ Google+ By News Highland – May 11, 2010 WhatsApp Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Pinterest Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margey WhatsApp Need for issues with Mica redress scheme to be addressed raised in Seanad alsolast_img read more


Category: tgrcpupz

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Stranded trainee pilot fears he will lose 91K course fee By News Highland – July 11, 2012 Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Pinterest Google+ Twitter Facebook 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic WhatsApp Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th WhatsAppcenter_img Pinterest A Derry trainee pilot stranded in Florida when his course was halted unexpectedly has said the last few weeks have been the worst of his life.18 year-old Connor Deeney from Claudy and two trainee pilots from Donegal are among a group who were left stranded because of a dispute between The Florida Institute of Technology and its course partner PTC Waterford.Conor Deeney has spent 91 thousand euro to date on the course and isn’t sure if any of the money will be returned.He has been outlining how events unfolded on the Shaun Doherty Show:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/pilot1pmDERRY.mp3[/podcast] Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Previous articleAthletics – Collins 13th & Finnegan 10th At World JuniorsNext articleArranmore lifeboat launched to assist stranded vessel News Highland Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Twitter News Facebook 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Google+last_img read more


Recent Comments