Clerical Support Short-Term

Tag: 龙凤上海

first_imgDefinitionUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*REPRESENTATIVE DUTIES:On a temporary basis, provide clerical support and assistance to adepartment or program. Requires some practical knowledge, skills,training, and/or experience in a related setting. Supervisor willprovide direction.Provide support and assistance to regular employees in theDivision, Department or Program.Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Perform related tasks and duties, as required. Qualifications and Physical DemandsMINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:Education and Experience:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Or, any combination of education an experience that wouldprovide the required equivalent qualifications. LICENSES OR OTHER REQUIREMENTS :Some job assignments may require a valid California driver’slicense and/or possession of a license and/or certificate ofcompletion from an accredited college or agency relative to theassigned area. Continuing education, training or certification maybe required.Knowledge of:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Ability to:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Conditions of EmploymentUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*Employment is contingent upon verification of employment history,background verification as governed under Education Coderequirements, eligibility to work in the United States, andapproval by the CCCD Board of Trustees. Short term/temporaryassignments do not offer fringe benefits or pay for holidays ortime not worked but are entitled to sick leave per Labor Code2810.5. However, CalPERS retired annuitants are not entitled tothis benefit. The hours of work and effective date of employmentwill be arranged with the supervisor.Regular attendance is considered an essential job function; theinability to meet attendance requirements may preclude the employeefrom retaining employment.The person holding this position is considered a mandatedreporter under the California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Actand is required to comply with the requirements set forth in CoastCommunity College District policies, procedures, and Title IX.(Reference: BP/AP 5910)The Coast Community College District celebrates all forms ofdiversity and is deeply committed to fostering an inclusiveenvironment within which students, staff, administrators, andfaculty thrive. Individual’s interested in advancing the District’sstrategic diversity goals are strongly encouraged to apply.Reasonable accommodations will be provided for qualified applicantswith disabilities who self-disclose.Application materials must be electronically submitted on-lineat http://www.cccd.edu/employment . Incomplete applications and applicationmaterials submitted by mail will not be considered.Additional InformationAPPLICATION REQUIREMENTSTo be considered for employment you must submit a completeapplication packet. A complete application packet includes:Online Employment ApplicationAnswers to all of the supplemental questions.Candidates will also be responsible for all travel expenses ifselected for an interview, the Coast Community College Districtdoes not reimburse for candidate travel expenses.Disability AccommodationsIf you require accommodations in the Application or ExaminationProcess, please notify Human Resources by calling (714)438-4714.PHYSICAL DEMANDS AND WORK ENVIRONMENTcenter_img The physical demands are representative of those that must bemet by an employee to successfully perform the essential functionsof this job.The work environment characteristics are representative ofthose an employee encounters while performing the essentialfunctions of this job.Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individualswith disabilities to perform the essential functions.A detailed list of physical demands and work environment is onfile and will be provided upon request.The Coast Community College District is a multi-college districtthat includes Coastline Community College , Golden WestCollege , and Orange Coast College . The three colleges offerprograms in transfer, general education, occupational/technicaleducation, community services and student support services.Coastline, Golden West and Orange Coast Colleges enroll more than60,000 students each year in more than 300 degree and certificateprograms.Since it’s founding in 1947, the Coast Community College Districthas enjoyed a reputation as one of the leading community collegedistricts in the United States. Governed by a locally elected Boardof Trustees, the Coast Community College District plays animportant role in the community by responding to needs of achanging and increasingly diverse population.This direct link 2020 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (ASFSR) is the 2020Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Coast Colleges. Thecrime statistics for calendar years 2017, 2018, and 2019 weresubmitted to the U.S. Department of Education as required under theJeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus CrimeStatistics Act. A hardcopy can be provided from one of the CampusSafety Offices. Please contact any of the Campus Safety Offices forany questions regarding the report.Coast Community College District is an Equal OpportunityEmployerThe Coast Community College District is committed to employingqualified administrators/managers, faculty, and staff members whoare dedicated to student learning and success. The Board recognizesthat diversity in the academic environment fosters awareness,promotes mutual understanding and respect, and provides suitablerole models for all students. The Board is committed to hiring andstaff development processes that support the goals of equalopportunity and diversity, and provide equal consideration for allqualified candidates. The District does not discriminate unlawfullyin providing educational or employment opportunities to any personon the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, genderexpression, religion, age, national origin, ancestry, sexualorientation, marital status, medical condition, physical or mentaldisability, military or veteran status, or geneticinformation.APPLICATIONS MAY BE FILED ONLINE AT:http://www.cccd.edu1370 Adams AvenueCosta Mesa, CA [email protected]last_img read more


Tag: 龙凤上海

first_img August 1, 2003 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Associate EditorFor Eddie Mulock, who once served on The Florida Bar’s Board of Governors, the idea sprang to mind while stretched out in a hospital bed preparing for a heart transplant. After he’d been given one day to live, Mulock learned precious perspective: “Getting fills your pockets. Giving fills your heart.” If he survived, he vowed he’d work to create a summer camp for special-needs kids.For Norman Gerstein, an 11th Circuit judge, inspiration came from his own two young sons, now 5 and 9, realizing how much time and attention kids need to flourish. Yet, he realized, so many foster children don’t have the same opportunities to thrive and just be carefree kids. Many live in neighborhoods so dangerous they spend entire summers locked behind doors watching TV.They are two Florida lawyers, one in Bradenton and one in Miami, who looked beyond their own privileged lives and dreamed up a way to let kids be kids – with nurturing, constructive programs fueled by not-for-profit corporations they head. Both Mulock and Gerstein say the biggest reward for their charitable work is seeing the smiles on the faces of the children they serve.Since the Florida Bar News first reported about each program (Mulock’s in the August 15, 2001, issue, and Gerstein’s in November 1, 2002), much has happened, thanks to generous donations and grants that both programs need to keep going. Here are their progress reports: Foundation for Dreams A major heart attack sent Mulock to Shand’s Hospital in Gainesville, where he was connected to a heart and lung machine while awaiting a new heart. Within those stark and sterile walls, Mulock had met a lot of very sick children stuck in hospitals too, and he wondered what they had to look forward to. He’d found out about special-needs camps, but learned there were none on Florida’s West Coast, and pledged to do something about it. When he got out of the hospital in 1995, he got busy making good on his promise and created the Foundation for Dreams. It would take more than five years of preparation before the first campers arrived and “Mr. Eddie” greeted them with teary enthusiasm.On more than 200 acres of a little used Boy Scouts of America property, Camp Flying Eagle in East Manatee County has been transformed into Dream Oaks Camp, an inclusive, barrier-free campground for children ages 6 to 18, who are terminally ill, mentally and physically challenged, as well as at-risk kids.“The Foundation is to establish dreams, mine and theirs, to help these kids have fun like any other children,” said Mulock.“They don’t have to worry about anybody making fun of them, because a lot of kids are just like they are.”All-terrain wheelchairs roll along nature trails. A slanted wooden ramp brings disabled children to saddle level where they happily trot away on gentle horses. Downs Syndrome children snuggle in the bottom of canoes while counselors do the paddling down the Manatee River. Blind children create art for others to see.Water-skiing clinics provide two-on-one instruction, using adaptive “sit skis” adjusted to a child’s weight, height, and ability.Sailboats are completely accessible and give kids a chance to pull the lines and steer the boat.Golf clinics provide one-on-one instruction for children of all abilities, including adaptive equipment.Wheelchair sporting events include basketball, hand-cycling, and boccie.When the first campers arrived in the summer of 2001, Dream Oaks was open only as a day camp and served 56 children.This summer’s seven weeks of camp, Mulock is pleased to report, served about 200 campers—a 30-percent increase over last year—and there are also residential “sleep-over” camp programs thanks to donations that have financed the construction of cabins.Construction is completed on the first four of 10 cabins. Three new cabins — funded by the Kiwanis Club of Bradenton, the Sertoma Club of Greater Sarasota, and the Norton Family — are under construction and are scheduled to open in the fall. Those new cabins will provide space to serve an additional 30 children each week.The new residential cabins have sidewalks connected to the dining hall and Manatee Memorial Health Lodge, where a full-time nurse carefully doles out medications and checks blood pressure and monitors vitals, and doctors are on call.Renovations are finished on the Splash Pools Aquatic Center. A new fire pit and Rotary Pavilion have been built. Fishing excursions on a newly outfitted pond are a new attraction. The Pat and Charlene Neal Nature Center is an ecology building and aviary, where children bend over microscopes studying plants and animals. Thanks to the Pilot Club, there is a better sound system for dances and talent shows.Each week of camp is geared to a special group. For example, June 22-27 catered to campers with hemophilia and other blood-related diseases, and July 14-18 was especially for children with developmental disabilities.This year, one more week of camp was added — a residential outdoor adventure camp open to individuals of all abilities. In the spring and fall, the agenda has been expanded to weekend retreats.The Dream Oaks Camp provides 2-to-1 or 3-to-1 ratio of campers to counselor, based upon the needs of the participant.Staff has been hired from as far away as South Africa, Russia, and Great Britain. All staff completed a week of training and hold CPR and First Aid certifications.“Every time I see a parent or a caregiver of one of our campers, I become overjoyed to hear how the camp has made an impact on their child’s life,” Mulock said, telling of the time a mother cried to see her son laugh, a rarity in his challenged life.“The smiles and pure joy I witness when I stop out to camp would not be possible without the support of our friends.” For more information, contact the Foundation for Dreams, Inc. 2620 Manatee Avenue West, Suite D, Bradenton 34205; phone: 941-748-8809, email at [email protected], or visit the Web site at www.FoundationforDreams.org. Summer Fun for KidsIf you’re at the Miami Seaquarium, the Miami Museum of Science, the Miami MetroZoo, or a park in the Miami area and happen to see a swarm of kids in Day-Glo lime-green T-shirts, chances are they belong to Judge Gerstein.“You can see them a quarter-mile away,” says Judge Gerstein of more than 400 children taking part in his Summer Fun for Kids program wearing their special shirts.As the name suggests, the program is all about providing fun activities for kids, most who have been removed from their homes by the State of Florida because of abuse, neglect, or abandonment, and are in emergency shelter or foster care.“The mission is to improve the lives of at-risk children by providing them the opportunity to enjoy summer activities in safe, nurturing environments that promote the development of their creativity, self-esteem, and independence,” Judge Gerstein said.It all started in 1999 when Judge Gerstein and his wife, Jackie, general counsel for Children’s Home Society, reached into their pockets to send eight foster children to camp at Temple Judea. They wanted these children to experience some of the same advantages their own boys enjoy.That kind gesture to help eight children grew into a nonprofit program that reached more than 140 children the summer of 2001 and has now grown to serving 400-500 kids.“It’s growing faster than I ever thought it would,” said Judge Gerstein, who has a trusted board of directors that does the fundraising and applies for grants.They’re doing a good job. The rapidly expanding program has reaped grants from the Heckscher Foundation for Children, the George and Ethel Kennedy Family Foundation, and The Melissa Institute for Violence Prevention and Treatment — and that influx of money has made all the difference.That financial support has made possible three new programs. More than 100 children attend the National Football League’s Youth Education Town for 10 weeks of camp.And more than 200 children attend Shake-a-Leg, a sailing camp for persons with disabilities, where the program includes a week of sailing in unsinkable boats, motorboat trips, and kayaking on Biscayne Bay.Shake-a-Leg was able to use funds from Summer Fun for Kids as a match for funds from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in order to provide a greater number of camp opportunities for special needs children, including those with developmental and physical disabilities.“One of the hallmarks of our program is that we work out a collaboration with agencies. For example, the Children’s Home Society is watching their own kids. They case-manage their own kids,” Judge Gerstein explained.“The University of Miami people asked if we could devise field trips for the Pediatric AIDS clinic,” Judge Gerstein said. The idea, he explained, was these children have to take their drugs and go to counseling, and the field trips would be an incentive to follow their rigorous treatment regimens.“It’s part of a reward system and actually has a medical-social bent,” Judge Gerstein said.The reward for the Gersteins and the lawyers who volunteer their time on the Summer Fun for Kids board of directors is seeing smiles on the faces of children who’ve had a rough time in their young lives.“I know these children are our future,” Judge Gerstein said. “There are some kids who can get into horrible situations and have lots of problems. That’s also our future if we ignore our children. But if we step in and do something, these children who are our future can be happy and successful.”One of the many benefits of the program, Judge Gerstein said, is that foster kids are “mainstreamed” with children who don’t come from dysfunctional homes.“They learn as much from other children as the program themselves. They learn about attitudes, about kids who did not grow up in foster care.”The original Summer Fun for Kids gave at-risk and special needs children an opportunity to attend camp or field trips throughout Miami-Dade County, including 110 kids who attended camp at the Museum of Science, the Miami Seaquarium, Danny Berry Baseball Camp, and the City of South Miami Parks and Recreation Department. In addition, 30 children with special needs went on field trips to more than 20 locations twice a week.This summer, about 70 children attended the City of South Miami’s camp, 25 children to the YMCA and Trinity Church Camp, and 30 to 40 special needs children will go on field trips twice a week to about 20 different locations. (Some of these field trips will take place during Christmas and spring breaks, too.)Counting the happy faces on kids having fun this summer, Judge Gerstein knows first-hand: “Each one of us can make a huge difference in a child’s life.” For more information about Summer Fun for Kids, write 2900 Middle St., Suite 700, Miami, FL 33133, call 305-442-2815, or email [email protected] Lawyers go to bat for kids Two programs strive to let kids be kids Lawyers go to bat for kids:last_img read more


Tag: 龙凤上海

first_imgMillhousen, IN—Late Wednesday morning the Marion Township Volunteer Fire Department was dispatched to County Road 650 South for a working structure fire. Greensburg Fire Department was requested for tanker support and the Letts Community Volunteer Fire Department and the  Decatur County EMS were also dispatched for mutual aid. According to the MTVFD, upon arrival, the units found a detached garage fully involved. The roof had collapsed and the fire was what was left in the structure.  No injuries were reported with the incident and the units were on scene for roughly 2 hours.last_img



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