Los Angeles-Class Fast-Attack Submarine USS Louisville Visits Malaysia

Tag: 达丰厂附近快餐

first_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: Fast-Attack View post tag: Louisville View post tag: visits Back to overview,Home naval-today Los Angeles-Class Fast-Attack Submarine USS Louisville Visits Malaysia Share this article April 4, 2012 Training & Education View post tag: USS View post tag: Los Los Angeles-Class Fast-Attack Submarine USS Louisville Visits Malaysia View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: submarine View post tag: Malaysia The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Louisville (SSN 724) arrived in Malaysia April 3 for a visit as part of its deployment to the western Pacific.Louisville moored alongside USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) to receive tended support for the submarine tender.“We anticipate performing a variety of submarine support services for Louisville to ensure all systems are fully functioning and operational when she returns to sea,” said Lt. Cmdr. James Hicks, Emory S. Land’s production maintenance officer.Emory S. Land’s Repair Department is capable of providing tended support to U.S. submarines worldwide. Land can conduct equipment adjustments, repair and manufacturing to ensure the continued readiness of Louisville and quality of life for its crew during their deployment.With a crew of more than 145 Sailors and officers, Louisville will conduct a multitude of missions and showcase the latest capabilities of the submarine fleet.“I visited Sepangar on a previous deployment, so I am excited for my crew to see this beautiful country, be exposed to its rich culture, and interact with its people,” said Cmdr. Lee P. Sisco, commanding officer. “It is mutually beneficial for the United States Navy and royal Malaysian navy to have professional and personal interactions between our service members. Not only does this help us to improve each other’s capabilities through shared ideas and knowledge, but we also build upon the trust and cooperation that are critical in our relationship as counterparts.”Louisville is a multi-mission platform that can operate independently, or in conjunction with carrier strike groups and joint forces to support the mission of the United States Navy throughout the world.“From the moment Louisville left Pearl Harbor, our Sailors have stayed focused, active and alert,” said Senior Chief Fire Control Technician Joseph Bransfield, chief of the boat. “Each Sailor on board knows that ownership, stewardship and high standards lead to excellence, which in turn results in quality liberty. While we are in port we plan to spend time reconnecting with family and friends, recharging our batteries and forging new memories with our shipmates.”For most of the crew members, this is their first time visiting Malaysia.“Growing up in a small New England town, I didn’t experience much diversity,” said Electronics Technician Seaman Joshua Hamilton. “Our port visit to Malaysia will be my first chance to experience a new culture. After being underway for so long I am excited to be in the sun again and participate in the Malaysian outdoors.”Measuring more than 360 feet long and weighing more than 6,000 tons when submerged, Louisville is one of the most advanced and stealthiest attack submarines in the world. Louisville uses her stealth, mobility, endurance, and firepower to perform missions in undersea warfare, surface warfare, strike warfare, mine warfare, battlespace preparation including intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance, and combat search and rescue.Louisville is homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Commissioned in 1986, it is the fourth United States ship to bear the name.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , April 04, 2012; View post tag: Angeles-Classlast_img read more


Tag: 达丰厂附近快餐

first_imgVal Kirillovs, research & insight director, Him & MCA Insight, on challenges and opportunities for the bakery food-to-go market.Food-to-go continues to be an important sector for the eating-out market, with growth forecast to accelerate in 2019 as the sector continues to outperform the total category.For bakery, there are significant growth opportunities forecast across the next three years. By 2022, c-stores  and supermarkets will account for 35% of food-to-go, and sandwich/bakery retailers will have 15% – a combined value of £11.6bn, up £1.8bn on 2019.However, the picture isn’t necessarily as bright as anticipated. The MCA Bakery & Sandwich Tracker Q4 2018 report shows the number of eating-out visits involving bakery items dropped by 4% to 1.4 billion in Q4 2018. This was strongly affected by consumers reducing their snacking occasions, the most significant bakery day-part, as more customers looked after their waistlines and wallets.Cookies were the number one sweet bakery item, bought on 3.5% of all out-of-home meal and snack occasions, but the category has lost share since Q4 2017. Consumers opted for more indulgent sweet bakery options during the quarter, choosing cake and cheesecake with both items winning share at breakfast and snacking, while doughnuts grew at lunch and dinner.Overall, sweet bakery suffered declines, and savoury bakery propped up the sector. Winning savoury items included sausage rolls, bagels, wraps, panini, pasties, pies and croissants, all of which gained share compared to a year ago. The growth of sausage rolls and pasties was driven by success in Greggs.Health is a key trend that continues to make an impact on the food-to-go sector, and shoppers are generally willing to spend more on healthy than unhealthy food. For example,the average shopper would be willing to spend £1.44 on a single snack, but a healthy snacking shopper would be willing to spend £1.84 (Him Healthy Snacking Report 2018).The rise of the health agenda can pose a threat to some sub-categories of the bakery sector, but those best placed to grow are prepared for the challenges ahead. Health-conscious shoppers are not opposed to indulgence and treats, so how you position your products can be key to driving sales.Catering for all consumers in the current climate is incredibly challenging. Focusing and executing a service aimed at one consumer demographic can often be more successful than trying to please everyone.Note: An extended version of this article is in the 2019 Bakery Market Report – available free to British Baker subscribers here.last_img read more


Tag: 达丰厂附近快餐

first_imgThousands of people in Jakarta are at risk of becoming homeless after losing their livelihoods because of the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, several NGOs have reported.”Between April 20 and 24, we received 71 complaints from Jakartans saying they are struggling to pay their rent,” Rujak Center for Urban Studies executive director Elisa Sutanudjaja said in a teleconference on Wednesday.The complaints, she said, ranged from sellers to college students, housewives, construction workers, taxi drivers, app-based ride-hailing drivers and app-based massage therapists. Read also: Indonesia’s economy heads into turbulence as Q1 growth plunges: Economists”I’ve fallen behind on my rent for more than a month. I’ve talked to my landlord but I don’t know how long he can give me leniency,” Budi said in the teleconference.Budi, who used to worker as a hawker in Ancol, said he lost his livelihood after the Jakarta administration temporarily closed tourist destinations in the city to curb the spread of the virus.”I’ve tried to earn money in other ways but I’ve only made enough to feed my wife and three children; it isn’t enough to pay our Rp 1 million rent each month,” he said.Elisa said the government should provide a safety net to ensure residents who rented homes would not become homeless.”The government should provide a mechanism to give renters leniency or provide rental relief,” she said.The government could also cooperate with NGOs to list residents who have become homeless.”The government could provide temporary housing for residents who have been evicted from their rental homes by utilizing sport halls, schools, mosques or vocational training centers,” she said.Read also: Indonesia could enter recession as virus response remains fractured, unclear: EconomistsLBH Jakarta director Arif Maulana said the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic had also put people who borrowed money from online lenders at risk of intimidation and data breaches.”In the last two months we have recorded 53 cases related to online lenders. Many residents are struggling to pay their debts because of the pandemic. However, creditors refuse to provide leniency despite the current situation,” Arif said on Wednesday.He said many borrowers experienced online or even physicals threats from creditors after falling behind on their dues.”Some creditors even leak the borrowers’ data online.”According to Arief, layoffs were the second most common legal issue the institute handled during the pandemic.”We have received 35 complaints regarding layoffs in the last two months. Apparently many companies have refused to fulfill their obligations when laying off employees. “Some residents said they were pressured to resign from their jobs so that the company did not have to pay severance pay. Some companies did not pay the employees’ health insurance for months before they were laid off, some purposefully laid off by their employees before Ramadan so they do not have to pay for the Idul Fitri holiday bonuses,” he said.Topics : Thousands of other Jakarta residents are also at risk of losing their homes.”Thirty five percent of Jakarta residents live in rented homes,” she said.A recent survey conducted by the Amrta Institute, Lokataru Foundation, Indonesian Legal Aid Foundation (YLBHI), Jakarta Legal Aid Institute (LBH Jakarta) and Rujak Center for Urban Studies found that around 27 percent of Jakartans were now struggling to pay their rent.Budiarso, a resident from Pademangan Barat, North Jakarta is one of these people.last_img read more


Recent Comments