Reconstructions of Antarctic topography since the Eocene–Oligocene boundary.

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first_imgAccurate models of past Antarctic ice sheet behaviour require realistic reconstructions of the evolution of bedrock topography. However, other than a preliminary attempt to reconstruct Antarctic topography at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary, the long-term evolution of Antarctica’s subglacial topography throughout its glacial history has not previously been quantified. Here, we derive new reconstructions of Antarctic topography for four key time slices in Antarctica’s climate and glacial history: the Eocene–Oligocene boundary (ca. 34 Ma), the Oligocene–Miocene boundary (ca. 23 Ma), the mid-Miocene climate transition (ca. 14 Ma), and the mid-Pliocene warm period (ca. 3.5 Ma). To reconstruct past topography, we consider a series of processes including ice sheet loading, volcanism, thermal subsidence, horizontal plate motion, erosion, sedimentation and flexural isostatic adjustment, and validate our models where possible using onshore and offshore geological constraints. Our reconstructions show that the land area of Antarctica situated above sea level was ~25% larger at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary than at the present-day. Offshore sediment records and terrestrial constraints indicate that the incision of deep subglacial topographic troughs around the margin of East Antarctica occurred predominantly in the Oligocene and early Miocene, whereas in West Antarctica erosion and sedimentation rates accelerated after the mid-Miocene. Changes to the topography after the mid-Pliocene were comparatively minor. Our new palaeotopography reconstructions provide a critical boundary condition for models seeking to understand past behaviour of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, and have implications for estimating changes in global ice volume, temperature, and sea level across major Cenozoic climate transitions.last_img read more


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first_imgDefinitionUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*REPRESENTATIVE DUTIES:On a temporary basis, provide clerical support and assistance to adepartment or program. Requires some practical knowledge, skills,training, and/or experience in a related setting. Supervisor willprovide direction.Provide support and assistance to regular employees in theDivision, Department or Program.Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Perform related tasks and duties, as required. Qualifications and Physical DemandsMINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:Education and Experience:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Or, any combination of education an experience that wouldprovide the required equivalent qualifications. LICENSES OR OTHER REQUIREMENTS :Some job assignments may require a valid California driver’slicense and/or possession of a license and/or certificate ofcompletion from an accredited college or agency relative to theassigned area. Continuing education, training or certification maybe required.Knowledge of:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Ability to:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Conditions of EmploymentUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*Employment is contingent upon verification of employment history,background verification as governed under Education Coderequirements, eligibility to work in the United States, andapproval by the CCCD Board of Trustees. Short term/temporaryassignments do not offer fringe benefits or pay for holidays ortime not worked but are entitled to sick leave per Labor Code2810.5. However, CalPERS retired annuitants are not entitled tothis benefit. The hours of work and effective date of employmentwill be arranged with the supervisor.Regular attendance is considered an essential job function; theinability to meet attendance requirements may preclude the employeefrom retaining employment.The person holding this position is considered a mandatedreporter under the California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Actand is required to comply with the requirements set forth in CoastCommunity College District policies, procedures, and Title IX.(Reference: BP/AP 5910)The Coast Community College District celebrates all forms ofdiversity and is deeply committed to fostering an inclusiveenvironment within which students, staff, administrators, andfaculty thrive. Individual’s interested in advancing the District’sstrategic diversity goals are strongly encouraged to apply.Reasonable accommodations will be provided for qualified applicantswith disabilities who self-disclose.Application materials must be electronically submitted on-lineat http://www.cccd.edu/employment . Incomplete applications and applicationmaterials submitted by mail will not be considered.Additional InformationAPPLICATION REQUIREMENTSTo be considered for employment you must submit a completeapplication packet. A complete application packet includes:Online Employment ApplicationAnswers to all of the supplemental questions.Candidates will also be responsible for all travel expenses ifselected for an interview, the Coast Community College Districtdoes not reimburse for candidate travel expenses.Disability AccommodationsIf you require accommodations in the Application or ExaminationProcess, please notify Human Resources by calling (714)438-4714.PHYSICAL DEMANDS AND WORK ENVIRONMENTcenter_img The physical demands are representative of those that must bemet by an employee to successfully perform the essential functionsof this job.The work environment characteristics are representative ofthose an employee encounters while performing the essentialfunctions of this job.Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individualswith disabilities to perform the essential functions.A detailed list of physical demands and work environment is onfile and will be provided upon request.The Coast Community College District is a multi-college districtthat includes Coastline Community College , Golden WestCollege , and Orange Coast College . The three colleges offerprograms in transfer, general education, occupational/technicaleducation, community services and student support services.Coastline, Golden West and Orange Coast Colleges enroll more than60,000 students each year in more than 300 degree and certificateprograms.Since it’s founding in 1947, the Coast Community College Districthas enjoyed a reputation as one of the leading community collegedistricts in the United States. Governed by a locally elected Boardof Trustees, the Coast Community College District plays animportant role in the community by responding to needs of achanging and increasingly diverse population.This direct link 2020 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (ASFSR) is the 2020Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Coast Colleges. Thecrime statistics for calendar years 2017, 2018, and 2019 weresubmitted to the U.S. Department of Education as required under theJeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus CrimeStatistics Act. A hardcopy can be provided from one of the CampusSafety Offices. Please contact any of the Campus Safety Offices forany questions regarding the report.Coast Community College District is an Equal OpportunityEmployerThe Coast Community College District is committed to employingqualified administrators/managers, faculty, and staff members whoare dedicated to student learning and success. The Board recognizesthat diversity in the academic environment fosters awareness,promotes mutual understanding and respect, and provides suitablerole models for all students. The Board is committed to hiring andstaff development processes that support the goals of equalopportunity and diversity, and provide equal consideration for allqualified candidates. The District does not discriminate unlawfullyin providing educational or employment opportunities to any personon the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, genderexpression, religion, age, national origin, ancestry, sexualorientation, marital status, medical condition, physical or mentaldisability, military or veteran status, or geneticinformation.APPLICATIONS MAY BE FILED ONLINE AT:http://www.cccd.edu1370 Adams AvenueCosta Mesa, CA [email protected]last_img read more


Tag: 苏州新茶服务

first_imgMainers will head to the polls Tuesday, electing a new governor, filling a number of state and county positions and weighing in on five referendum questions. The questions are listed first, followed by candidates appearing on local ballots and poll places and times.Question 1: Universal Home Care ProgramQuestion 1 is a Citizen’s Initiative, meaning it was brought forward after a petition process collected enough signatures. The wording of Question 1, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you want to create the Universal Home Care Program to provide home-based assistance to people with disabilities and senior citizens, regardless of income, funded by a new 3.8% tax on individuals and families with Maine wage and adjusted gross income above the amount subject to Social Security taxes, which is $128,400 in 2018? If approved, Question 1 would create a Universal Home Care Program that would provide in-home and community support services for Mainers that require assistance due to either old age or disability.The program would be funded by new taxes on wage income and non-wage income that exceeds the amount of wages subject to Social Security taxes; in 2018 that figure was $128,400. Specifically, a 1.9 percent tax would be applied to both the employer and the employee on wage income in excess of $128,400. A 3.8 percent tax would also be applied to qualifying non-wage income, reduced by the amount paid in relation to wage income; by design this would cap the tax at 3.8 percent. That tax would generate $310 million annually, according to the state’s Office of Fiscal and Program Review.A nine-member board would be created to oversee the program. The law would require that at least 77 percent of the funding go directly to service worker costs.Question 2: Wastewater Infrastructure BondQuestion 2 is a bond issue, meaning it was passed by two-thirds of the Legislature prior to appearing on the warrant. The wording of Question 2, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you favor a $30,000,000 bond issue to improve water quality, support the planning and construction of wastewater treatment facilities and assist homeowners whose homes are served by substandard or malfunctioning wastewater treatment systems? This question would authorize the state to issue $30 million in bonds, mostly to support Department of Environmental Protection-issued grants to municipalities for pollution abatement facilities. A total of $27.65 million would be used for that purpose, prioritizing areas with high-value shellfish resources. Another $2 million would be used to replace failing septic systems through the Small Communities Grant Program and the final $350,000 would assist homeowners eliminating residential overboard discharge systems on the coast.Assuming 5 percent interest over 10 years, the $30 million bond would generate $8.25 million in interest.Question 3: Transportation BondQuestion 3 is a bond issue, meaning it was passed by two-thirds of the Legislature prior to appearing on the warrant. The wording of Question 3, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you favor a $106,000,000 bond issue, including $101,000,000 for construction, reconstruction and rehabilitation of highways and bridges and for facilities and equipment related to ports, piers, harbors, marine transportation, freight and passenger railroads, aviation, transit and bicycle and pedestrian trails, to be used to match an estimated $137,000,000 in federal and other funds, and $5,000,000 for the upgrade of municipal culverts at stream crossings? Question 3 authorizes the state to issue $106 million in bonds: $80 million to the Department of Transportation to support highway and bridge improvements; another $20 million to the MDOT for facilities and equipment relating to marine transportation, aviation, railroads, bicycles and pedestrian trails; $1 million to the Maine Maritime Academy to improve the waterfront pier in Castine; and $5 million to the Department of Environmental Protection to fund the installation of culverts at stream crossings to improve fish habitats.Assuming 5 percent interest over 10 years, the $106 million bond would generate $29.15 million in interest.Question 4: Public University BondQuestion 4 is a bond issue, meaning it was passed by two-thirds of the Legislature prior to appearing on the warrant. The wording of Question 4, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you favor a $49,000,000 bond issue to be matched by at least $49,000,000 in private and public funds to modernize and improve the facilities and infrastructure of Maine’s public universities in order to expand workforce development capacity and to attract and retain students to strengthen Maine’s economy and future workforce? This question would allow the state to issue $49 million in bonds for construction and renovation projects within the University of Maine System. The funds would be distributed at the direction of the Board of Trustees, with that board having approved projects in all seven campuses. At the University of Maine at Farmington campus, $8.5 million in Question 4 funds would be used to renovate the Olsen Student Center, Mantor Library and build a new Child Care & Early Education Center, as well as support improvements in the classrooms and dorms.Assuming 5 percent interest over 10 years, the $49 million bond would generate $13.47 million in interest.Question 5: Community College BondQuestion 5 is a bond issue, meaning it was passed by two-thirds of the Legislature prior to appearing on the warrant. The wording of Question 5, as it appears on the ballot, is this:Do you favor a $15,000,000 bond issue to improve educational programs by upgrading facilities at all 7 of Maine’s community colleges in order to provide Maine people with access to high-skill, low-cost technical and career education? Question 5 would allow the state to issue $15 million in bonds to support the Maine Community College System. The funds would go toward the seven colleges for a variety of purposes that range from creating new programs to energy efficiency improvements to facilities. At the Central Maine Community College in Auburn, $2.5 million would be used to renovate and expand instructional laboratories, upgrade information technology infrastructure and upgrade heating and ventilating systems.Assuming 5 percent interest over 10 years, the $15 million bond would generate $4.12 million in interest.The state-wide ballot (all towns in Franklin County vote on this)Gubernatorial ElectionAlan Caron of Freeport (Independent)Teresea Hayes of Buckfield (Independent)Janet Mills of Farmington (Democrat)Shawn Moody of Gorham (Republican)[Note: While appearing on the ballot, Caron has dropped out of the race, endorsing Mills]U.S. Senate ElectionEric Brakey of Auburn (Republican)Angus King of Brunswick (Independent) [Incumbent]Zak Ringelstein of Yarmouth (Democrat)U.S. Congressional District 2 ElectionTiffany Bond of Portland (Independent)Jared Golden of Lewiston (Democrat)William Hoar of Southwest Harbor (Independent)Bruce Poliquin of Oakland (Republican) [Incumbent]State Senate District 17Russell Black of Wilton (Republican)Jan Collins of Wilton (Democrat)State House of Representatives DistrictsHouse District 74 – Includes the towns of Jay, Livermore Falls and part of Livermore.Christina Riley of Jay (Democrat) [Incumbent]Robert Staples of Jay (Republican)House District 112 – Includes the towns of Anson, Avon, Carrabassett Valley, Carthage, Kingfield, New Portland, Phillips, Starks, Weld and Sandy River Plantation, plus the unorganized territories of East Central Franklin (including Freeman, Madrid and Salem Townships), and Perkins and Washington Townships.Thomas Skolfield of Weld (Republican) [Incumbent]Cynthia Soma-Hernandez of Anson (Democrat)House District 113 – Includes the towns of Farmington and New Sharon.Paul Brown of Farmington (Republican)Scott Landry of Farmington (Democrat)House District 114 – Includes the towns of Chesterville, Industry, New Vineyard, Strong, Temple and Wilton.Randall Hall of Wilton (Republican)Cherieann Harrison of Wilton (Democrat)Maitland Lord of Chesterville (Independent)House District 117 – Andover, Bethel, Byron, Eustis, Gilead, Greenwood, Hanover, Lovell (part), Newry, Rangeley, Stoneham, Stow, Upton and Plantations of Coplin, Dallas, Lincoln, Magalloway and Rangeley, plus the unorganized territories of North Franklin, North Oxford, South Oxford (including Albany and Mason Townships) and West Central Franklin.Frances Head of Bethel (Republican) [Incumbent]Stephanie LeBlanc of Bethel (Democrat)Judge of ProbateRonald Aseltine of Wilton (Independent)Margot Joly of Weld (Democrat)County TreasurerQuenten Clark of Farmington (Republican)Pamela Prodan of Wilton (Democrat) [Incumbent]Register of DeedsSusan Black of Wilton (Republican) [Incumbent]District Attorney for District 3 (includes Franklin County)S Thomas Carey of Auburn (Republican)Andrew Robinson of Farmington (Democrat) [Incumbent]County Commissioner for District 3 (includes Weld, Avon, Strong, New Vineyard, Industry and everything north of those five towns)Clyde Barker of Strong (Republican) [Incumbent]Polling locations and times [Note: All polls close at 8 p.m.]AVON – municipal building at 1116 Rangeley Road – opens at 8 a.m.CARRABASSETT VALLEY – town office at 1001 Carriage Road – opens at 8 a.mCARTHAGE – town office at 703A Carthage Road – opens at 8 a.m.CHESTERVILLE – town office at 409 Dutch Gap Road – opens at 8 a.m.COPLIN PLANTATION (& Wyman Twp) – town office at 8 School Street – opens at 10 a.m.DALLAS PLANTATION – townhouse at 436 Dallas Hill Road – opens at 10 a.m.EUSTIS – town office at 88 Main Street – opens at 8 a.m.FARMINGTON – community center at 127 Middle Street – opens at 8 a.m.INDUSTRY – town office at 1033 Industry Road – opens at 8 a.m.JAY – community building at 13 Community Drive – opens at 8 a.m.KINGFIELD – Webster Hall at 38 School Street – open at 8 a.m.NEW SHARON – town office at 11 School Lane – open at 8 a.m.NEW VINEYARD – Smith Memorial Hall at 1680 New Vineyard Road – opens at 8 a.m.PHILLIPS (& Madrid) – Phillips Primary School at 15 Russell Street – opens at 8 a.m.RANGELEY – town office at 15 School Street – opens at 8 a.m.RANGELEY PLANTATION – School House at 393 South Shore Drive – opens at 10 a.m.SANDY RIVER PLANTATION – town office at 33 Town Hall Road – opens at 10 a.m.STRONG (& Freeman) – Forster Memorial Building at 14 South Main – opens at 8 a.m.TEMPLE – town hall at 258 Temple Road – opens at 8 a.m.WELD – multi-purpose room at 23 Mill Street – opens at 10 a.m.WILTON – municipal building at 158 Weld Road – opens at 8 a.m.last_img read more


Tag: 苏州新茶服务

first_imgAccording to U.S. Solicitor General Donald B. Verrilli Jr., the defining feature of his job—the most challenging, rewarding aspect—is grappling with what the position of the United States should be on an issue. Verrilli explained that this task is harder than it might seem, involving a balancing of interests and making considered decisions on whether the U.S. should modify a previously held position.Verrilli’s talk, held Wednesday, Oct. 31 at Harvard Law School, was sponsored by Law and Government Program of Study Faculty Leaders David Barron and Richard Lazarus.“I don’t know whether in my time in office, I have gotten that right, or I will get it right,” Verrilli said. “They’re exceedingly difficult and challenging judgments, but every solicitor general has described this as the greatest legal job one could have, and it certainly has been for me. And one of the main reasons why is dealing with this set of issues…often of great moment.”Francis Biddle, who was solicitor general from 1939 to 1940, once claimed that the solicitor general serves an abstract client, and has “no master to serve but his country.” But Verrilli said he has a somewhat different view. “Having been awakened more than once in the middle of the night by phone calls from angry general counsels from Cabinet departments about decisions I had made, [I think] the client is anything but an abstraction.”Watch a video of Verilli’s talk on the HLS website.last_img read more


Tag: 苏州新茶服务

first_imgTeekay LNG Partners said that Brody Speers, the current chief financial officer (CFO) of Teekay Gas Group has been appointed as vice president, corporate finance, of Teekay Shipping (Canada).Scott Gayton, who currently serves as a vice president at Teekay, has been appointed to assume the CFO position from Speers, Teekay LNG Partners said in a statement.Gayton brings over 20 years of finance and accounting experience, including most recently serving as CFO of Tanker Investments from the time of its initial public offering until its merger with Teekay Tankers.He will also continue to oversee capital markets transactions across the Teekay Group.Commenting on the appointments Mark Kremin, president and CEO of Teekay Gas Group said that Speers was instrumental in the successful financing of LNG Partnership’s newbuilding program.At the same time, Kremin noted the company will focus on executing Teekay LNG’s strategic plan.last_img read more


Tag: 苏州新茶服务

first_imgYoung Chanderpaul hits brilliant 187 off GT bowlersBy Rajiv BisnauthTAGENARINE Chanderpaul stole the limelight on day two of the fifth round Guyana Cricket Board (GCB) Jaguars Franchise League, Three-day tournament between West Demerara and Georgetown, yesterday at the Lusignan Community Centre ground.Displaying his wide repertoire of strokes, the 20-year-old decimated the Georgetown attack with a scintillating 187, his first ton in the eight-round tournament.His 347-ball innings took West Demerara to 357, an overall lead of 187.In reply, Georgetown were left with much work to do, after West Demerara successfully chipped away with the wickets of Robin Bacchus (4), Andrew Lyght Jr (23) and Sunil Singh (32) during the final session.When play ended, Georgetown were 62-3, still facing a first innings deficit of 113 with seven wickets remaining.Jahran Byron and Christopher Barnwell will resume today on seven and four respectively.Starting the day’s play with the aim of out batting their opponents, West Demerara batsmen did exactly that.West Demerara’s batting performance extended through two sessions of play on day two to put them in complete command and on course for victory.First-class opener Chanderpaul,and Akshaya Persaud showed a lot of composure in ensuring their team took complete control of the game.Resuming on 96, Chanderpaul reached his hundred, while Persaud got to his fifty. Both batsmen reached their respective landmarks within the first 15 minutes of play.Chanderpaul was certainly the hero of the innings with his first hundred in the tournament.It was decorated with two boundaries and five huge sixe and ended when he was nearing his double century.The pair seized the advantage and took the score to 203. In the process they put together 163 runs for the fourth-wicket while taking the attack to the opposition bowlers.However, off-spinner Gajanan Suknanan (3-89) provided the City team with the vital breakthrough when he trapped Persaud leg before wicket for 72.West Demerara then lost Yetesh Dhanpaul (5) off the bowling on Ronaldo Alimohamed. Kemol Savory was removed by Suknanan for seven, while Travis Persaud was bowled by left-arm pacer Andre Stoll (2-50) without scoring, at 235-6.By lunch, West Demerara had consolidated their lead to 74. Chanderpaul was on 134 in company with Romario Shephard on two.Resuming after lunch, Shephard was bowled by Devon Lord for seven, while Richie Looknauth was removed by Christopher Barnwell for five.However, Chanderpaul continued his superb knock, and together with Mahendra Dhanpaul, added 69 for the ninth wicket to further put their team in total control.Howerer, both batsmen fell just before the tea interval, to medium pacer Kellon Carmichael (2-35). Chanderpaul’s innings spanned 414 minutes, inclusive of eleven fours and seven sixes.Meanwhile, summarised scores in the other three games are as follows:At Port Mourant: Essequibo,resuming on their overnight score of 99/4 in reply to Upper Corentyne’s 206/9 declared, were eventually dismissed for 165. Former West Indies Test batsman Shivnarine Chanderpaul top scored with 55. Bowling for Upper Corentyne, Eon Hooper bagged 5/30.Upper Corentyne,in their second turn at the crease,were then dismissed for 201. Clinton Pestano top scored with 47, Kevlon Anderson made 40, Eon Hooper also made 40 and Jason Sinclair chipped in with 20. Kemo Paul (4wks), Anthony Adams (3wks) and Ricardo Adams (2wks) were the main wicket takers.Essequibo,requiring 243 for victory,are 0/1 with Rayon Fredericks the batsman dismissed.At Enterprise: West Berbice declared at their overnight total of 407/9,with Keyron Fraser on 120 not out and Collis Butts 34 not out.East Bank Demerara,in their reply,reached 275/8 with the consistent Danny Narayan scoring 72 and Tevin Imlach making 70. Bowling for West Berbice, Keyron Fraser has so far taken 3/41 while Kevin Jawahir has 3/59.At Albion: The home team, Lower Corentyne, were bowled out for 193. Seon Hetmyer made 54 while Surujnarine Kandasammy and Jonathan Foo contributed 46 and 37 respectively. Bowling for East Coast Demerara, Amir Khan bagged 5/69 while Paul Wintz had 3/44.East Coast Demerara were then pegged back by Lower Corentyne who claimed 7 East Coast Demerara wickets for just 97 runs before close of play.Bowling for Lower Corentyne, Kassim Khan has so far taken 3/20 while Royston Crandon has 2/10. Ramnarine Chatura made 23 and Bhaskar Yadram contributed 21 for East Coast Demerara.last_img read more


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