Professional development and professionalization of family accommodation service providers – Room to VET

Tag: 爱上海QF

first_imgEurope is traditionally the world’s most important tourist macro-region, and family accommodation in Europe accounts for about 13% of the total available accommodation capacity.When it comes to Croatia, it has more than 500 thousand beds in family accommodation, which is more than half of the total accommodation capacity in Croatia. Modern tourists are increasingly staying in family accommodation looking for more freedom, privacy, an authentic tourist experience through interaction with the local community, better prices and greater value for money. Although family accommodation is relatively widespread in Europe and is constantly increasing, European destinations face a number of challenges due to the lack of control over its development.One of the main development challenges is the education of the owner of family accommodation and its professionalization, all with the aim of raising the quality of family accommodation and, ultimately, raising the overall level of quality of the destination offer. Another important trend that characterizes the modern family accommodation market is the increasing use of ICT both on the tourist demand side, in the travel planning phase and during the stay in the destination, and on the tourist offer side through the application of ICT in the promotion and sale of family accommodation.Bearing in mind the growing need of private accommodation owners for lifelong learning and for raising the level of their knowledge, skills and competences and, on the other hand, respecting the increasingly widespread use of ICT in family accommodation, the project was launched. Rooms to VET. The project is funded by the EU Erasmus + KA2 fund, implemented by the Institute of Tourism in Zagreb in cooperation with 8 partners from 4 European countries (Cyprus, Greece, Slovenia, Spain) and the project involves experts in the field of tourism, lifelong vocational education and ICT -and in tourism.The main goal of the project is to raise the level of quality and competitiveness of family accommodation in partner countries, using a free “e-learning” platform for owners of family accommodation and holiday homes, which will allow users to quickly, interestingly and easily (so-called “bite -sized learning ”) acquire the knowledge and skills they need to improve the level of quality of family accommodation. The platform will consist of 6 learning modules designed based on a detailed research of the educational needs and habits of family accommodation owners. These are the following modules: hospitality and service culture, planning for successful business, improving daily business, arranging and beautifying the accommodation facility, creating innovative products and services, and more efficient promotion and sales. Users of the platform will go through each module in a way that they will first learn the theoretical basis from a certain area and then go through the process of checking the acquired knowledge.In addition to the platform, on the project website (www.roomstovet.eu) there will be a database with best practices in the field of family accommodation as an example and incentive to other renters who want to raise the quality of their accommodation facility. PROGRAM – ROOMS TO VET – Professional development and professionalization of family accommodation service providers PROGRAMME09:00 – 10:00: GATHERING AND REGISTRATION OF PARTICIPANTS10:00 – 10:30: OPENING OF THE MEETING AND PRESENTATION OF THE PROJECTo Ministry of Tourism of the Republic of Croatiao University of Zadar- Welcome speecheso Renata Tomljenović and Damir Krešić, Institute of Tourism- Presentation of the “Rooms to VET” project10:30 – 11:30: POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITATIONS OF FAMILY ACCOMMODATION DEVELOPMENTo Ivo Kunst, Institute of Tourism- National program for the development of family accommodationo Nedo Pinezić, Family Tourism Association at the Croatian Chamber of Commerce- Current situation and development possibilities of family accommodation11:30 – 12:00: COFFEE BREAK12:00 – 13:30: EXAMPLES OF GOOD PRACTICEo Damir Hordov, Zadar County Tourist Board- “WELCOME” – Labeling of family accommodation in Zadar Countyo Anamarija Cicarelli, Interligo doo- Lifelong education and professional development of family accommodation ownerso Siniša Miljević, Istrian Development Tourist Agency (IRTA)- Application of ICT in the promotion and sale of family accommodation in Istriao Goran Rihelj, Portal hrturizam.hr- Hosts in family accommodation as ambassadors of Croatian tourismo Neven Palčec, myRent doo- Management of reservations in family accommodation – channel management13:30 – 14:30 – LUNCH BREAK14:30 – 15:30 – ROUND TABLE WITH PARTICIPANT’S QUESTIONS:THE FUTURE OF FAMILY ACCOMMODATION IN CROATIA – OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS(moderator: Goran Rihelj)o Mila Razović, University of Zadaro Nedo Pinezić, Family Tourism Association at the Croatian Chamber of Commerceo Blanša Mićin and Šime Knežević, owners of family accommodationo Anamarija Cicarelli, Interligo dooo Siniša Miljević, Director of the Istrian Development Tourist Agency (IRTA) 15:30: END OF THE MEETINGlast_img read more


Tag: 爱上海QF

first_imgFitbit apparently isn’t as accurate as advertised and now the company is being sued for it.The lawsuit says they don’t correctly measure your heart rate.Fitbit says it spent three years perfecting its Pure Pulse technology and its Charge HR device being a best-seller proves how well it works.last_img


Tag: 爱上海QF

first_img Taylor VorthermsSports Editor at The Ellsworth AmericanTaylor Vortherms covers sports in Hancock County. The St. Louis, Missouri native recently graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and joined The Ellsworth American in 2013. Part 1: Invisible, incapacitating concussions are sidelining high school athletes – July 19, 2016 BUCKSPORT — While some girls name their dolls, 12-year-old fencer Erin Gerbi names her sword blades.“This one is Charm,” says the Orono native, showing off her new saber last Thursday evening at John Krauss’ fencing class at the Jewett School. Charm joins “Dark Maul” and “Darth Sabre” in Gerbi’s collection of weapons.Erin began fencing three years ago after attending an introductory class at Krauss’ Down East School of Fencing in Verona Island. Krauss founded the school two decades ago at a time when fencers across the state had no access to formal training.While the sport is gaining popularity nationally, Krauss is still one of few full-time instructors in Maine giving aspiring fencers an opportunity to try it out.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text“I try to communicate the spirit of fencing,” says Krauss, a veteran national competitor. “The idea of the cavalier and noble knights … Kids still have a lot of fantasy stuff in their minds. I just need to light that fire.”Nine-year-old Zoe Sikkel of Bucksport, one of seven children at Krauss’ introductory class last Thursday afternoon, says she became interested in fencing though movies such as “The Princess Bride.”“It’s a really historical thing, and I thought it would be awesome to try,” Sikkel says while peeling away layers of white protective gear after class. “It’s hot,” she says of her garb, “but worth it.”Sikkel says that when she’s holding the foil — one of three fencing weapons along with the saber and epee — she feels like she’s “in her own world.”“It’s like you’re one of the people in the movies,” she says with closed eyes and splayed arms. “It’s just like, wow.”Krauss’ classes are private — fencing is not yet a sanctioned school sport in Maine.Ellsworth High School freshman Emma Henry, 14, began attending Krauss’ classes two years ago.“Emma has always had a great imagination,” says Kirsten Henry, Emma’s mother as well as owner of the ice cream shop Mortons Moo in downtown Ellsworth. “Ever since she was a young child, she has asked about fencing. I just didn’t know there was anything in this area.”Krauss trains about 65 fencers, ranging in age from 7 to 70, in locations including Verona Island, Bucksport, Old Town, Rockport, Belfast and Northeast Harbor. He began offering classes in 1995 when he noticed fencers gathering informally to duel in YMCA gymnasiums.Krauss has since introduced the sport to countless children, including Azaline Dunlap-Smith — a Machias native who discovered her knack for fencing through Krauss’ classes when she was 9. Today, Dunlap-Smith competes internationally in the women’s epee division. Krauss says he expects she’ll eventually compete in the Olympics.“I’ve trained and worked with many talented fencers,” Krauss says. “If I hadn’t been here, a lot of kids wouldn’t have found the sport they enjoy. It’s an option for kids beyond just team sports.”Krauss conducts his introductory classes with patience. He teaches children the scoring system, which awards one point each time a fencer touches an opponent with his or her weapon.When the young fencers begin slicing the air with foils, Krauss gently suggests a more efficient, and less erratic, stroke.“I want to convey that fencing is a thing of integrity, honor and ability,” Krauss says, “As opposed to a forceful brawl.”Erin Gerbi, however, doesn’t hesitate to share her favorite part of fencing.“Hitting people,” she says. “I like being able to attack.”Erin’s mother, Aimee Gerbi, signed her daughter up at age 9 after noticing her fondness for sword fighting a neighbor boy using bamboo sticks.“Saber is a more aggressive weapon, and that appealed to Erin,” Aimee says. “You don’t have to poke, you get to whack, and the head is a target.”Amy laughs. “That about sums up Erin.”Erin isn’t afraid to speak her mind during the class for advanced fencers. She stands with her hip cocked, appearing bored, as a less experienced boy takes his position across from her on the strip.“Does he know what he’s doing?” Erin mumbles. “Or can I hit him?”Erin is determined to make the national tournament this season. But she’s at a disadvantage in Maine. The road to Nationals requires accumulating “points” at regional competitions. The closest contest for the Gerbis is in Boston, with the majority farther south in New Jersey and New York.Aimee, who has three other children, says the travel expenses add up.“It can be a challenge,” she says. “For a kid like Erin to get enough points, it means a tournament almost every weekend.”Last season, Erin won the Maine-New Hampshire youth age 14 and under saber division because she showed up.“Here’s how many Y14 saber fencers are in Maine and New Hampshire,” Aimee says, holding up one finger. “Here, Erin can find maybe five kids to fence, and she can beat them easily.”Without the competition available in other northeastern states, Erin practices her footwork daily by herself on a half strip in her basement.“She’s dedicated, but she’s still a 12-year-old girl,” Aimee says. “She’d rather be doing footwork with other kids.”For 11-year-old Chase Emmer of New Jersey, his favorite part of fencing is “getting to see my friends.”Emmer, last season’s Y10 national foil champion, summers in Maine and attends Krauss’ classes to keep his skills sharp.Lily Millard (left) and Chase Emmer compete in a fencing class last Thursday at the Jewett School in Bucksport. PHOTO BY TAYLOR VORTHERMS“I think I’ll ride this into college,” says the soft-spoken boy.Emmer’s mother, Natalin Po, refers to New Jersey as “the East Coast mecca for fencing.”“Fencing is definitely growing there,” she says. “When Chase first started five years ago, I didn’t even hear about fencing.”But within the last couple years, Po says most schools in their area have begun offering fencing as an after-school activity.“New Jersey has the highest concentration of fencers,” Krauss says. “So if it’s building there, that tells you something.”Krauss says the trend is slowly reaching Maine, with other fencing clubs opening up across the state. Interest in Krauss’ classes has also grown in recent years.“I used to have to advertise,” Krauss says. “Now, they call me.”Fencers such as United States Olympic saber silver medalist Tim Morehouse have helped the cause. Last year, Morehouse gave seminars at EHS and Ellsworth Elementary-Middle School advocating for the implementation of fencing as a school sport.“It would make a great high school sport,” Kirsten Henry says. “More kids would get involved if they knew about it.”For Erin, fencing seems to suit her feisty personality.“Fencing has become a part of who I am,” Erin says. “I don’t know what I’d do without it.”At a recent tournament, Aimee Gerbi says a mother approached her to rave about Erin’s great sportsmanship. When she referred to Erin as “charming,” Krauss, who was sitting nearby, scoffed at the compliment.“Oh, she’s charming alright,” Krauss said to the woman in jest. “She’s got her own special kind of charm.”For Erin’s birthday, she got a blade.“She named it Charm,” Aimee says, “so she can hit people with her charm.”For more information about the Down East School of Fencing, call John Krauss at 974-8461, email him at [email protected], or visit downeastfencing.net. Latest posts by Taylor Vortherms (see all) Latest Postscenter_img Part 2: When the injury is inside your head, some “don’t get it” – July 26, 2016 Bio EHS names new boys’ soccer coach – July 13, 2016last_img read more