Greensky Bluegrass Covers Jimi Hendrix And The Grateful Dead In Capitol Theatre Debut [Full-Show Audio/Videos]

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first_imgLast night, jam-grass favorites Greensky Bluegrass continued their fall tour with their first-ever show at beloved Port Chester, NY venue The Capitol Theatre. After an opening set from fellow bluegrass group Cabinet, Greensky took the stage for a stand-out performance stacked with covers of classic tunes by Jimi Hendrix and the Grateful Dead, as well as a rousing performance of American gospel standard “Working On A Building” with help from Cabinet’s JP Biondo (mandolin) & Pappy Biondo (banjo).You can watch videos from the show below courtesy of YouTube user Sean Roche, and stream the full show audio thanks to archive.org user taperjeff!I’d Probably Kill YouMiss SeptemberWorking On A Building:Just To Lie > Past My TimeCassidy > Cryptical Envelopment > The Other OneWindshieldBlack Muddy River Greensky Bluegrass @ The Capitol Theatre 9/17/16:Set 1:I’d Probably Kill YouWorried About The Weather >Foxey Lady (Jimi Hendrix cover) >Clinch Mtn BackstepMiss SeptemberRadio BluesWorking On A Building $Just To Lie (1) >Past My PrimeLiving OverSet 2:Cassidy (GD cover)>Cryptical Envelopment (GD cover)>The Other One (GD cover)>Cassidy (GD cover)Dustbowl Overtures (2)WindshieldBurn ThemReverendWings For WheelsBroke Mountain Breakdown (3) >Leap YearEncore:Merely AvoidingBlack Muddy River (GD cover)$ – w/ JP Biondo (mandolin) & Pappy Biondo (banjo)(1) – w/ Foxey Lady quotes(2) – shakedown tease in intro(3) – working on a building teaselast_img read more


Tag: 爱上海DS

first_imgWhile most students were returning to Cambridge last weekend, a group of about 50 were gathered in Central Massachusetts, reconnecting with old friends and meeting new ones, in some cases while belting out “Let It Go” during karaoke. The pop anthem from the movie “Frozen” about surmounting tough challenges seemed a fitting choice for these first-years who’d made it through their transition to College and were looking ahead to spring semester.The Saturday karaoke session, which ran overtime due to enthusiasm, was one of the activities offered during the First-Year Retreat, held over three days at the Prindle Pond Conference Center in Charlton. The goal of the annual gathering is to help students regroup and reflect on personal identity and core values through guided sessions with older students, coupled with various options for activities, mindfulness and wellness training, and relaxation.“I didn’t expect to come to so many realizations about myself so quickly, but I did,” said Ibrahim Mammadov ’23, who passed on karaoke for an afternoon of painting with watercolors. “We’re learning a lot about optimism and positivity, and how to solve problems in a new way.”The trip was organized by the First-Year Experience Office, part of the Harvard College Dean of Students Office. The retreat, now in its fifth year, is offered on a first-come, first-served basis during Wintersession at no cost to students. Financial support for the retreat is provided by the Harvard College Dean’s Office and the Dean of Students Office.“One of the benefits of having the retreat between the fall and spring semesters is that the participants have had a full semester of experiences to draw on, and they can reconnect with what got them here and what’s special about their life journey so far,” said Madeleine Currie, resident dean of first-year students, who has overseen the retreat since it began in 2015. “There is also something powerful about taking people out of their usual physical environment, which accelerates reflection and making new connections in your own mind and more connections to one another.”For some students that social piece was key.,“If you didn’t make the most social connections because you were busy studying during the first semester, this is a great way to meet new people,” said Tuzo Mulunda ’23, who learned about the retreat through friends. “Getting out of Cambridge and coming out here to Prindle Pond has been great, and I’ve just been going into every activity with an open mind.”The schedule is loosely structured around the themes of past, present, and future. Staff directors Nina Bryce and Stacey Blondin worked with student facilitators for two months to create a curriculum that encouraged participants to think about their lives on campus and establish goals for the upcoming semester.“My main hope is that, at the end of the weekend, the participants feel a little less tightly wound in terms of the pressures of being a Harvard student,” said Bryce. “A lot of students I work with talk about imposter syndrome and worrying about optimizing every moment, so I hope they feel a little more free to do what they really want and to connect with each other. I want them to have that sense of living in alignment with what really matters to them, going into their second semester.”On Friday, shortly after arriving by bus, facilitators worked in small groups with participants to create a “River of Life,” a drawing project in which people create landmarks for important moments in their lives and discuss the effects of these moments on their lives today.Saturday’s activities included “Instant Best Friends,” modeled on a method outlined in a New York Times piece, “The 36 Questions That Lead to Love.” Students met in small groups and pairs to ask each other questions like: “If you were able to live to the age of 90 and retain either the mind or body of a 30-year-old for the last 60 years of your life, which would you want?” and “Would you like to be famous? In what way?”Before leaving on Sunday afternoon, participants developed goals for personal growth, work, education, and relationships that they hope to achieve over the next months and years.,“The retreat put me into a really great mindset to start the new semester with, and the reflective activities left me with some actionable goals that I’m bringing with me as I start class again,” said Yoel Hawa ’23. “I think it was really well organized, and I loved all the planned activities that were set up for us, but my favorites were the spontaneous ones that we just did together, like singing while hiking through the woods or playing Mafia late into the night.”Hawa and Mammadov were two of the 13 participants who turned off or surrendered their phones for the weekend as a way to fully unplug from everyday stressors and engage more meaningfully with others on the retreat.“I really wanted to be present,” said Mammadov.For the student facilitators, the retreat offered a chance to learn new skills and create new friendships with each other and with the student participants, most of whom they wouldn’t encounter on campus. Six of the 15 facilitators were former participants, and three were taking a return crack at the position.“Talking to first-years about stresses in their lives made me remember similar stresses my freshman year, and think about how these things have changed or stayed the same,” said Nish Sinha ’21, a physics concentrator and facilitator. “The retreat was filled with kindness, intentionality, and laughter, and I definitely will try to take these ideas into the second half of my junior year.”“We talk about how students develop a sense of belonging, and this is a time when the participants start to experience that in a way that perhaps they haven’t in the first semester, when everything feels so new,” said Currie. “It’s wonderful that the students have this community experience where they can be more authentically themselves.” When the trees become the teacher College Events Board expands, creating bigger sense of community on campus Boston high schoolers experience hands-on connection to climate change The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Three lies and lots of truths on campus Growing beyond Yardfest Tagging along on a student-led historical tour Relatedlast_img read more


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first_imgColumbus, IN—If you planned to visit the Kohl’s in Columbus for some 24-hour shopping, you might want to hold that thought.  The Columbus Fire Department was dispatched to Kohl’s on Saturday after a fire alarm manual pull lever was activated. Firefighters arrived on the scene and found an activated sprinkler head discharging water near the front of the store.A large volume of water was released from a single sprinkler head above a drop ceiling causing portions of the ceiling to collapse onto the floor, drenching merchandise racks near the cashier area. The entrance floor was flooded with about one-half inch of water.Firefighters turned off the water system, as well as the electric service to the building for safety purposes. CFD advised the store to remain closed until damages can be fully assessed and repairs can be completed. Kohl’s said it may not open again for a few days.Investigators say that the incident likely occurred as a result of a faulty sprinkler head.last_img read more


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first_imgST JOHN’S, Antigua, (CMC) – Windward Islands Volcanoes will be taking nothing for granted when they come up against minnows West Indies Under-19s, in the first game of a doubleheader that opens the Antigua leg of the Regional Super50 here yesterday.Volcanoes, boasting the likes of two-time Twenty20 World Cup-winning captain Darren Sammy and the current West Indies pair of Johnson Charles and Andre Fletcher, enter the contest at the Vivian Richards Cricket Stadium as the definite favourites but captain Liam Sebastien said Tuesday they would not be underestimating the young side.“We will be looking to start with a win. In any competition it is always important to start off good. The guys are obviously raring to go and the guys are focused on that mission of winning the first game which obviously would set the tone,” Sebastien said.“Also, they are not a team we are going to underestimate. They’ve been preparing for a while, they’ve had a few camps together and it’s something we’re mindful of. We’re not going into the game complacent saying we’ve won the game alreadyWe know we still have to go out and play a good game of cricket. It is something we are aware of. We are aware of them in terms of what they can bring because we will be going into the game as favourites and favourites don’t always win.”Antigua will play host to Zone A which also comprises title-holders Trinidad and Tobago Red Force, Leeward Islands Hurricanes and English County side, Kent Spitfires.Today’s feature game set for the Coolidge Cricket Ground will see Kent clashing with Hurricanes in a day/night affair.But despite fixtures against the likes of Red Force and Kent, Sebastien believes the clash with the Windies Under-19s is the most critical one for Volcanoes.“This could be one of the most important games of the group for us because this is our first game and it’s against the team everybody expects to be the minnows of the group so it’s something that’s going to be very important in terms of our performance as a group,” he stressed.Meanwhile, Under-19s head coach Graeme West said his side were still building their confidence ahead of their first outing.However, he said their practice match last Sunday had gone a long way in boosting the side’s belief, and he was now hoping to see signs of development as the squad used the tournament as preparation for next year’s Youth World Cup.“We are building on what we did in [the camp in] Grenada in December,” the Englishman said.‘There are some nerves in the group. We have some young guys and inexperienced players in terms of senior cricket so on reflection I think it was a good exercise on Sunday. A lot of them come away from it with a lot more belief that they can compete at the senior level.”He continued: “I think what we are really looking for is the ability to make good decisions. For the bowlers, they are going to be under pressure. They are some very positive players they are going to be bowling against so it’s a little bit composure, a little bit setting the right fields for what they are trying to do.“For the batters, certainly at the top of the order, it’s really a case of developing the belief that they can perform.”last_img read more


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first_imgRafael Nadal overcame Gilles Simon in straight sets to reach the quarter-finals of the men’s tennis in Rio.The Spaniard, who had been an injury doubt coming into the tournament after pulling out of the French Open in May, won 7-6 (5), 6-3 after his opponent had looked to be coming back into the match after going 5-1 down in the second set.He will now face either Thomaz Bellucci, the home favourite, or Belgium’s David Goffin in the last eight. Organisers had to call off the action yesterday but Nadal came through following the delay and will be followed by Britain’s Andy Murray and Johanna Konta.The Scot, who breezed through to the third round on Tuesday, is set to meet Italy’s Fabio Fognini while Konta is set to take on Germany’s Angelique Kerber in the quarter-final of the women’s event.In their only previous meeting so far, world no.2 Kerber knocked Konta out of the Australian Open this year in the semi-finals.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more