Greensky Bluegrass Welcomes Joshua Davis In Fayetteville [Photos]

Tag: 爱上海BW

first_imgGreensky Bluegrass strolled through George’s Majestic Lounge on Wednesday night in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The band’s development as a tight-knit, outstanding explosion of musicianship has been noted over the years as they’ve honed their craft since founding in 2000, and Wednesday night’s show proved why they are becoming one of the most talked about jamgrass acts in the scene.GSBG opened Wednesday’s show with a fast-paced “Into the Rafters,” which first appeared on their 2008 album Five Interstates. After an all-business dobro-mandolin duet, Anders Beck and mandolinist/lead vocalist Paul Hoffman closed it out, efficiently moving onto “The Four.” The track features a fantastic signature dobro lick, and some catchy lyrics: “I keep digging holes in someone else’s ditch; I’m looking for apples but they’re all in the trees. Somebody help me cause I can’t be saved; But I haven’t done anything I can’t name…” The backup vocals on the repeating chorus toward the end were a nice touch.Guitarist and vocalist Dave Bruzza took over on the mic for “Room Without a Roof,” a hearty, melancholy, wistful-feeling track. The song appears on the latest album, Shouted, Written Down & Quoted, released in September on the band’s label, Big Blue Zoo.After a rousing “Gumboots” and another new track called “Merely Avoiding,” Bruzza stepped back up to sing “Worried About the Weather,” revealing a sort of Dylan-esque vocal pattern. It felt comfortable, as his voice does; like the 30-year-old aural memory of your ultra-talented great uncle Who-Almost-Made-The-Bigtime-In-Nashville singing in the living room with your dad at midnight while you’re pretending to sleep upstairs.The instrumental jam in “Weather” was outstanding as well, with the mando and dobro volleying back and forth in a chemistry-packed pickin’ battle, tight as could be. The crescendo that culminated with full-group, high-speed pickin-heavy jam was exhilarating — the first of many similar instances during the night. Shortly after, the sound levels crept back down to just a dobro solo during which Beck flexed some muscle, showing off some mad skills and even incorporating some wah-wah pedal effects.After a short singalong on “Casual Wednesday,” the evening’s opening act, Joshua Davis from television’s “The Voice,” came out for a couple of songs. He played guitar on “Wild Bill Young,” and then also sang lead on “Last Winter in the Copper Country,” which turned into a 12-minute jam session and was enjoyable, while also a little different.The closer for GSBG’s 85-minute first set was “Can’t Stop Now,” played at breakneck pace with the banjo leading loud and proud on the fast rhythm and the mandolin stealing the spotlight with some great melodic licks. Hoffman, at this point, was fully in the moment; I daresay Ricky Skaggs would’ve been proud. Beck slayed again with a mean, extended dobro solo that felt reckless yet free, like driving down the highway with the windows down, hair all a mess, doing 95 MPH with no seatbelt.Second set kicked off with “What’s Left of the Night,” featuring great lead vocals by Hoffman, and Beck’s dobro standing out again, discreetly taking the lead in a song filled with longing and love. The banjo solo by Michael Arlen Bont on this track was excellent and thrilling; and then Beck took over again, and he busted out some new-for-this-night effects that had his dobro sounding more like Robert Randolph’s rock-and-roll-funk pedal steel. Hoffman followed it up with a psychedelic mando solo, playful but gentle as the song slowed down to a close after 14 minutes — the second-longest track of the evening.Next was a crowd-pleasing “Miss September,” followed by the traditional Stanley Brothers’ hit “Pig in a Pen,” made infamous through covers by Ricky Skaggs, Phish, Old and In the Way, Grateful Dead. Bruzza’s vocals sounded appropriately and impressively “Eastern Kentucky traditional mountain sound.”A couple songs later, GSBG’s “Break Mountain Brokedown” and its rhythmic, dance-inspiring lead melody, by primarily the dobro (and at times the guitar and the mando), mesmerized as much of the audience as any song managed to. The song featured a huge jam with pedals and some wah-wah and other funky dobro effects. Again, the dobro effects started getting more rock-and-roll toward the end of 15-minute long song, and it seamlessly blended into the beginning of a rocking rendition of “Walk Away” (by The James Gang/Joe Cocker). The guitar and dobro effects were perfect for the cover, particularly the driving rhythm and lead melody of the intro and chorus.Shortly after came the driving banjo leading on “Radio Blues,” featuring the best vocals of the night by Bruzza, with great enunciation and tone. The track included fascinating dobro and guitar solos that — even at this late point in the show — demanded closer attention and visual connection.Next came a quiet, gradual intro, as is typical, to GSBG crowd fave “Windshield.” The audience finally was quiet and paying close attention as Hoffman captured them with his voice. The last song of the second set was “Run or Die,” with some gritty, hard-rock dobro effects and guitar-pickin’ calisthenics, while the mandolin kept a fiery pace going on rhythm, even during a soft funky bass solo by Mike Devol. The solo grew into a driving, breakneck full-band jam led by Hoffman, channeling Jeff Austin / YMSB circa 2010 at Red Rocks: just going off, lost in his own internal high-speed-bluegrass universe.After revisiting the “this is the last Casual Wednesday” joke, the soulful, classic waltz encore kicked off, “Drink Up and Go Home,” which was originally recorded by Carl Perkins and later by Jimmy Martin, Bobby Bare, Jerry Garcia and David Grisman, among others. If anyone ever sounded more like they’ve suffered heartbreak when they sang this tune, I sure haven’t heard it. Hoffman’s voice is so rich with emotion; it is refreshing and particularly impressive when you see it at shows again and again. It was indeed beautiful, moving and even provocative. Then, they tripled their tempo for a 45-second wrap-up jam, closing out the number and the night on a string of energetic high notes.You can check out photos from Greensky’s performance last night, courtesy of Jeremy Scott, plus the setlist, below.Setlist: Greensky Bluegrass | George’s Majestic Lounge | Fayetteville, AR | 5/17/2017Set I: Into The Rafters, The Four, Room Without A Roof, Gumboots, Merely Avoiding, Worried About The Weather, *Casual Wednesday, *Wild Bill Jones, *Last Winter In Copper Country. Can’t Stop NowSet II: What’s Left Of The Night>Miss September, Pig In A Pen, Blood Sucking F(r)iends, Anders Banter Talk> Broke Mt. Breakdown>Walk Away>Down The Road>Broke Mt. Breakdown, The Radio Blues, Windshield, Run Or DieEncore: Casual Wednesday Reprise>Drink Up And Go Home>Broke Mt. Breakdown* with Joshua Davis Load remaining imageslast_img read more


Tag: 爱上海BW

first_imgWhen the global recession hit in 2008, few nations were spared the devastating impact or lingering aftershocks, including the United States and China, the world’s top economic superpowers. Looking to better understand the crisis and help the Chinese government navigate its challenges, Liu He, M.P.A. ’95, a leading Beijing economist and policy adviser who now serves as minister of the Office of the Central Leading Group on Financial and Economic Affairs, assembled a research team in 2010 to study the circumstances surrounding the Great Depression of the 1930s and the 2008 recession in the hope that the comparison might provide some guideposts.The resulting analysis, published jointly this month by the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center, identifies a number of instructive similarities between the two crises, including large, nearly-identical income gaps between the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans and everyone else in 1928 and 2007; populist, nationalist, and economic problems that led to poor decision-making by policymakers; and a broadly-felt redistribution of wealth and power on a global scale.The analysis offers a number of important insights for policymakers and investors around the world, say Lawrence Summers and Graham Allison in the paper’s foreword. Summers is the Charles W. Eliot University Professor and Weil Director of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center. Allison is the Douglas Dillon Professor and the Belfer Center’s director.The Gazette asked Summers and Allison about the study’s key observations and policy recommendations and how those might inform U.S. economic and foreign policy strategies. GAZETTE: Which “lessons from China” would you advise U.S. leaders to implement today, and why? Could they work in this political system?SUMMERS: We should be cautious about extrapolating lessons from China to the United States. China has a very different political system, and an economy at a different stage of development. Certainly, the way China responded very strongly and boldly to the financial crisis with a major program of fiscal expansion — and got very good results — is an instructive lesson for economies around the world.“It is easier to prevent a crisis, or at least prepare to combat one, than to recover from one that has already occurred,” said Graham Allison. File photos by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerALLISON: Liu He recommends China focus on “putting our domestic affairs in order as the foundation for tackling external impacts and realizing our peaceful rise in the world.” This advice resonates with many in the United States who, remembering costly American commitments in Iraq and Afghanistan, are wary about engaging in new adventures abroad.In Minister Liu’s view, during the financial crisis, politicians were too often “hijacked by short-term public opinion and mired in political gridlock, afraid of breaking ideological constraints.” This also rings true in the U.S., where politics has grown increasingly partisan, often at the expense of wise policymaking. In contrast to the U.S. and Europe, China executed policy decisions rather smoothly and was more able to weather the crisis. He also stresses the importance of “making long-term preparations for structural changes resulting from the crisis,” but this will be difficult in the U.S.GAZETTE: While the U.S. economy continues to stagnate, China has sustained about three-quarters of its pre-crisis annual growth rate of 10 percent and accounts for a staggering 40 percent of the world’s economic growth since 2008. Is that attributable strictly to China’s post-2008 policy decisions, or are there other forces at work? And could this kind of growth be duplicated in the West?SUMMERS: No. The largest reason why China is growing so rapidly is that it has substantial opportunities to catch up. The average Chinese standard of living is less than a quarter of the American standard of living. In fact, China’s living standards are now about equal with America’s living standards around 1930. There’s much to admire in what the Chinese have done, but extrapolating their experience to industrialized economies would be a serious mistake.GAZETTE: While the world seems to be waiting for a new theory or solution to break out of the current economic crisis, Liu’s analysis concludes that whether it returns to form will “largely depend on external luck.” Do you agree and if so, what does that mean going forward?ALLISON: This is another way of pointing out how difficult it is for economists to predict the future. But as Minister Liu points out, prevention is often the best medicine. It is easier to prevent a crisis, or at least prepare to combat one, than to recover from one that has already occurred. So going forward, it would be wise to focus not just on recovering from the current crisis, but on putting in place measures that will make it easier to mitigate the next crisis.“The average Chinese standard of living is less than a quarter of the American standard of living. In fact, China’s living standards are now about equal with America’s living standards around 1930.” said Lawrence Summers.GAZETTE: China’s strategic realignment since the 2008 crisis — focusing on domestic issues while avoiding major international conflicts, acquiring new technologies from developed countries, investing in infrastructure — are driving an intense political debate right now in the U.S. Under what circumstances, if any, could you envision the U.S. making long-range economic policy decisions free from the constraints of short-term political calculation?SUMMERS: In a democracy, no decisions are made free from politics. All of the relevant decision-makers are part of a political system. That is as it should be. The U.S. does make long-run decisions — whether it’s our patent system that protects intellectual property, our leading biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health, or long-term investments that support international development, American democracy is capable of making investments that are farsighted and visionary. Certainly it’s true that we need more of that going forward. That’s a challenge for political leaders, but I don’t subscribe to the view that moving away from democracy is the way to get more emphasis on the long run.ALLISON: I don’t see the U.S. Congress tying its economic policy-making hands any time soon, even if it would be for the greater good.GAZETTE: The global economic crisis appears to be accelerating a shift in the balance of wealth and power from the U.S. to the Asia-Pacific region. What will that mean politically and economically for the U.S. and for Europe in the coming decade?SUMMERS: There’s no question that the world is going to be more multipolar and there’s going to be more income and wealth in emerging economies. With less absolute strength, we are going to have to be smarter in the strategies we pursue. It would be a mistake if we responded to these trends by becoming more isolationist. We have to be smarter in our engagement with the rest of the world.ALLISON: Speaking just about China, it is already the world’s largest energy consumer, top exporter, and top trading country overall. It will soon overtake the U.S. as the world’s largest economy, and according to some estimates, it will overtake the U.S. as the world’s top defense spender before the middle of the century. The question for both China and the U.S. is how to manage this transition peacefully, and how to uphold the current international order that provided the Asian security and economic environment in which China has emerged.last_img read more


Tag: 爱上海BW

first_imgLAWRENCEBURG, Ind. — A Lawnrecenburg man has been arrested on rape charges.According to police, Roland C. Pitcher, 55, was arrested on the charges of Rape and Sexual Battery.Police say pitcher raped a woman in his apartment in early April. In an initial court hearing, Pitcher pleaded not guilty.Bond has been set at $100,000.last_img