Greensky Bluegrass Welcomes Joshua Davis In Fayetteville [Photos]

Tag: 夜上海论坛ZZ

first_imgGreensky Bluegrass strolled through George’s Majestic Lounge on Wednesday night in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The band’s development as a tight-knit, outstanding explosion of musicianship has been noted over the years as they’ve honed their craft since founding in 2000, and Wednesday night’s show proved why they are becoming one of the most talked about jamgrass acts in the scene.GSBG opened Wednesday’s show with a fast-paced “Into the Rafters,” which first appeared on their 2008 album Five Interstates. After an all-business dobro-mandolin duet, Anders Beck and mandolinist/lead vocalist Paul Hoffman closed it out, efficiently moving onto “The Four.” The track features a fantastic signature dobro lick, and some catchy lyrics: “I keep digging holes in someone else’s ditch; I’m looking for apples but they’re all in the trees. Somebody help me cause I can’t be saved; But I haven’t done anything I can’t name…” The backup vocals on the repeating chorus toward the end were a nice touch.Guitarist and vocalist Dave Bruzza took over on the mic for “Room Without a Roof,” a hearty, melancholy, wistful-feeling track. The song appears on the latest album, Shouted, Written Down & Quoted, released in September on the band’s label, Big Blue Zoo.After a rousing “Gumboots” and another new track called “Merely Avoiding,” Bruzza stepped back up to sing “Worried About the Weather,” revealing a sort of Dylan-esque vocal pattern. It felt comfortable, as his voice does; like the 30-year-old aural memory of your ultra-talented great uncle Who-Almost-Made-The-Bigtime-In-Nashville singing in the living room with your dad at midnight while you’re pretending to sleep upstairs.The instrumental jam in “Weather” was outstanding as well, with the mando and dobro volleying back and forth in a chemistry-packed pickin’ battle, tight as could be. The crescendo that culminated with full-group, high-speed pickin-heavy jam was exhilarating — the first of many similar instances during the night. Shortly after, the sound levels crept back down to just a dobro solo during which Beck flexed some muscle, showing off some mad skills and even incorporating some wah-wah pedal effects.After a short singalong on “Casual Wednesday,” the evening’s opening act, Joshua Davis from television’s “The Voice,” came out for a couple of songs. He played guitar on “Wild Bill Young,” and then also sang lead on “Last Winter in the Copper Country,” which turned into a 12-minute jam session and was enjoyable, while also a little different.The closer for GSBG’s 85-minute first set was “Can’t Stop Now,” played at breakneck pace with the banjo leading loud and proud on the fast rhythm and the mandolin stealing the spotlight with some great melodic licks. Hoffman, at this point, was fully in the moment; I daresay Ricky Skaggs would’ve been proud. Beck slayed again with a mean, extended dobro solo that felt reckless yet free, like driving down the highway with the windows down, hair all a mess, doing 95 MPH with no seatbelt.Second set kicked off with “What’s Left of the Night,” featuring great lead vocals by Hoffman, and Beck’s dobro standing out again, discreetly taking the lead in a song filled with longing and love. The banjo solo by Michael Arlen Bont on this track was excellent and thrilling; and then Beck took over again, and he busted out some new-for-this-night effects that had his dobro sounding more like Robert Randolph’s rock-and-roll-funk pedal steel. Hoffman followed it up with a psychedelic mando solo, playful but gentle as the song slowed down to a close after 14 minutes — the second-longest track of the evening.Next was a crowd-pleasing “Miss September,” followed by the traditional Stanley Brothers’ hit “Pig in a Pen,” made infamous through covers by Ricky Skaggs, Phish, Old and In the Way, Grateful Dead. Bruzza’s vocals sounded appropriately and impressively “Eastern Kentucky traditional mountain sound.”A couple songs later, GSBG’s “Break Mountain Brokedown” and its rhythmic, dance-inspiring lead melody, by primarily the dobro (and at times the guitar and the mando), mesmerized as much of the audience as any song managed to. The song featured a huge jam with pedals and some wah-wah and other funky dobro effects. Again, the dobro effects started getting more rock-and-roll toward the end of 15-minute long song, and it seamlessly blended into the beginning of a rocking rendition of “Walk Away” (by The James Gang/Joe Cocker). The guitar and dobro effects were perfect for the cover, particularly the driving rhythm and lead melody of the intro and chorus.Shortly after came the driving banjo leading on “Radio Blues,” featuring the best vocals of the night by Bruzza, with great enunciation and tone. The track included fascinating dobro and guitar solos that — even at this late point in the show — demanded closer attention and visual connection.Next came a quiet, gradual intro, as is typical, to GSBG crowd fave “Windshield.” The audience finally was quiet and paying close attention as Hoffman captured them with his voice. The last song of the second set was “Run or Die,” with some gritty, hard-rock dobro effects and guitar-pickin’ calisthenics, while the mandolin kept a fiery pace going on rhythm, even during a soft funky bass solo by Mike Devol. The solo grew into a driving, breakneck full-band jam led by Hoffman, channeling Jeff Austin / YMSB circa 2010 at Red Rocks: just going off, lost in his own internal high-speed-bluegrass universe.After revisiting the “this is the last Casual Wednesday” joke, the soulful, classic waltz encore kicked off, “Drink Up and Go Home,” which was originally recorded by Carl Perkins and later by Jimmy Martin, Bobby Bare, Jerry Garcia and David Grisman, among others. If anyone ever sounded more like they’ve suffered heartbreak when they sang this tune, I sure haven’t heard it. Hoffman’s voice is so rich with emotion; it is refreshing and particularly impressive when you see it at shows again and again. It was indeed beautiful, moving and even provocative. Then, they tripled their tempo for a 45-second wrap-up jam, closing out the number and the night on a string of energetic high notes.You can check out photos from Greensky’s performance last night, courtesy of Jeremy Scott, plus the setlist, below.Setlist: Greensky Bluegrass | George’s Majestic Lounge | Fayetteville, AR | 5/17/2017Set I: Into The Rafters, The Four, Room Without A Roof, Gumboots, Merely Avoiding, Worried About The Weather, *Casual Wednesday, *Wild Bill Jones, *Last Winter In Copper Country. Can’t Stop NowSet II: What’s Left Of The Night>Miss September, Pig In A Pen, Blood Sucking F(r)iends, Anders Banter Talk> Broke Mt. Breakdown>Walk Away>Down The Road>Broke Mt. Breakdown, The Radio Blues, Windshield, Run Or DieEncore: Casual Wednesday Reprise>Drink Up And Go Home>Broke Mt. Breakdown* with Joshua Davis Load remaining imageslast_img read more


Tag: 夜上海论坛ZZ

first_imgReturning to the Mountain Hurts Like Hell Years before, I had sprinted this final stretch to the summit and bolted back down the mountain, eager to chase down competitors. This time, I paused for a few panoramic minutes to soak it all in: mountain melting into sky, ragged clouds, the bare quiet. There I was—standing atop that summit again—a shadow of my former self. I tried to remember what it felt like to be young, fast, and free. But all I could feel was the wind, weathering me and the 500-million-year-old mountain beneath my feet. I was afraid to go back. Years ago, I had spent my darkest, loneliest hours training and testing my limits on Mount Mitchell—the highest peak in the East. And for five straight years, I had run—and won—the Mount Mitchell Challenge—a 40-mile winter race to the top of Mount Mitchell. Some years, knee-deep snow and thick sheets of ice coated the traails. One year, torrential rain flooded the course.  Even in the worst weather, though, I knew that I had not fully faced the mountain. I had always ascended Mitchell from the west, where the climb is gradual. But there is another, meaner path to the top of Mount Mitchell from the opposite direction: the Black Mountain Crest Trail. It starts east of Mount Mitchell and climbs 3,000 feet in the first four miles. Then it roller-coasters steeply across five summits over 6,000 feet and ends atop Mitchell. The entire trail is only 12 miles, but it’s earned the moniker of Toughest Trail in Appalachia.  Sam was planning an out-and-back on the Black Mountain Crest Trail—around 25 miles. It was less than a marathon. I had run much longer distances. But the truth was: the trail scared the shit out of me. So did returning to Mitchell. I was afraid to see how age had diminished that younger version of myself. I had a choice: I could keep those shiny memories polished, or I could risk tarnishing them with an old-man DNF.  It had been over a decade since I had raced up Mount Mitchell. I was no longer the young, child-free, debt-free twentysomething who won the race five times. I was now a middle-aged dad with a wife, a mortgage, and a partially torn Achilles tendon. I had not returned to the summit of Mitchell since my last race in 2008. I had left everything out there on the trails that day and never looked back. I wanted the mountain to remember me at my best. Sam and I began the rugged 12-mile return trip. I felt a bit lighter—but maybe that was because I had guzzled most of the water in my pack. I relaxed into the run and savored the time with Sam. Most of all, I cherished the mountain—and all the peaks and valleys it had given me. I would have to make the most of the moments I had left up here, running across the sky. And it was time to start sharing them with my two boys, who might someday climb this mountain and ascend to even greater heights.  We began a steep ascent that instantly sucked all the oxygen out of my body. My lungs burned, my head fogged, and lactic acid scorched my legs. Clearly, I wasn’t the same runner from years ago. I was already thinking about turning back.  But earlier this year my friend Sam dared me to run the Black Mountain Crest Trail with him. Sam is the most talented all-around outdoor adventurer I know: he wins mountain bike races, paddles the region’s rowdiest whitewater creeks, climbs iconic routes, and runs the region’s toughest trails. How could I say no to a guy like him?  Sam glided up the trail, chattering away. I sputtered one-word responses and tried to hide my gasps for air as we climbed to the shoulder of Celo Knob. From there, vistas revealed the five jagged peaks we would climb on our way to the distant summit of Mitchell. Still, it felt good to be there. I was okay with not being young anymore. Even in my forties, I could still push my limits and dig deep. The contest had always been within. I scanned the other side of the mountain and spotted the path I had once raced down. Those races never really mattered to anyone but me, I realized. And the only thing that endured was the resolve to keep going, no matter what. Those memories were long gone, and it was time to make new ones.   Following a tough summit push, the author takes in stunning surrounding views. Photo courtesy of Will Harlan The boulder-strewn trail contorted and jackknifed along the razor-sharp ridgeline. At times, the trail was so steep that climbing ropes were needed to scramble up sheer rock faces. We slogged to the summits of 6,000-foot peaks—Winter Star Mountain, Potato Hill, Balsam Cone, Big Tom, and Mount Craig—and then stumbled steeply down them. On the descents, Sam deftly picked his lines through granite teeth and ankle-twisting rock gardens, and I wobbled along behind him. For most of the way, we were cloaked in the darkness of spruce forest—until finally we spilled out into the sunlight of Mount Mitchell’s parking lot.   I had plenty of excuses not to go: injury, work, kids. I almost bailed that morning on the way to meet Sam. But I couldn’t let him down, or myself. I arrived at the trailhead, where Sam was waiting. “It doesn’t get any better than this,” he said, and bounded up the trail. Parched and punished, Sam and I silently soldiered through the final miles. It would take everything we had to make it back to the trailhead before sunset. There were no crowds waiting for us at the finish. And that was just fine with me. Breathless once more in the shadow of Mitchell, I had stopped chasing the kid I once was, and I had started becoming the man I didn’t think I could be.last_img read more


Tag: 夜上海论坛ZZ

first_imgThe new building will comprise one and two-bedroom apartments with prices starting at $376,000, including a car park.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor9 hours agoThe airconditioned apartments will have open-plan living areas with floor-to-ceiling glass. Kitchens will feature stone benchtops and European stainless steel appliances.Kitchens will feature stone benchtops and stainless steel appliances.Property Solutions has completed 150 projects throughout its 20-year history, including the Centro on James Street project, the $350 million SW1 development in South Brisbane and The Barracks, a $150 million mixed-use and entertainment precinct in Paddington.Circa Nundah Village is recognised for its contribution to Nundah’s gentrification with an Urban Development Institute of Australia (Qld) Award for Excellence in Urban Renewal in 2015.This story was originally published on Quest Community News The final stage of a north Brisbane apartment development has been fast-tracked amid rising demand.Developer Property Solutions has launched the final stage of its $270 million Circa Nundah Village project.A nine-level, 120-apartment, Three Nundah Village building is being fast-tracked due to strong sales in the previous releases.Property Solutions has launched the final stage of its $270 million Circa Nundah Village, known as Three Nundah Village.Property Solutions managing director Kevin Miller says buyers are increasingly drawn to the precinct.“We’ve secured high-quality retailers and dining operators which has significantly uplifted the area and made it a destination rather than a thoroughfare,” he says.“This particular area of Nundah has been gentrified over the past few years and that has had a very positive effect on sales.”Buyer demographics have also shifted from investors in the early stages of the project to owner-occupiers now looking for lifestyle options.Inner-city luxury: Australia’s most popular apartment developmentsOpen-plan living areas and full-length glass may attract owner-occupiers.The Nundah Village precinct comprises several residential buildings, a Woolworths supermarket, 11,000sqm of office space and retail, dining and lifestyle amenities.last_img read more


Tag: 夜上海论坛ZZ

first_img The then new A wing of Townsville General Hospital in 1954, three years after its official opening. Historical Picture: State Library of Queensland “The building has gorgeous lines in it and beautiful curves in the balconies, we really wanted to make sure that was incorporated rather than try and work against it,” Ms Hart said.“We are on the top floor and were one of the first to build in that column, so we were able to make some modifications to the original plans; we’ve got an extra 30cm of ceiling than any of the other apartments because we could go up into the roof.” “All the doors are extra high and there’s internal sliding doors so that we’re not taking up extra floor space.” “Because it’s the penthouse it rises above the tower behind it and it’s the only level that can see right up over the hill, over Queens Gardens, and right up to Palm Island.”“It’s absolutely stunning like seriously the most incredible view — it’s amazing.” The couple also meticulously designed their perfect master-bedroom, which served as an escape from their busy lives as event producers and provided them with ample privacy when they wanted time away from their teenage children. “We really wanted a master-bedroom so that when we closed the door, we were in another world.”“We created a really incredible triple bathroom with a hidden sliding door, and you can lie in the bath and see Magnetic Island.”“There’s a four by four walk in wardrobe with custom built cabinetry, shoe draws, and a makeup cabinet.”RELATED: Contemporary classic with views to cherish With a family kitchen rivalling the set of MasterChef, it features top of the range appliances with an invisible range hood which rises from the stone bench. “We entertained quite a bit so we wanted a kitchen that was really beautiful and functional; we put a hidden butler’s pantry in behind a curved door that opens automatically, and then we did a triple kitchen.”“So we have the butler’s pantry, back wall, middle prep bench with a cook top, and then another space for breakfast eating and more prep on top of a massive dining area.”The Fulton Gardens complex is located in North Ward, and overlooks The Strand, featuring a double pool, gym and two acres of heritage listed gardens. Labor’s policies could deter Townsville investors leaving renters to foot the bill Breathtaking 270 degree views of Castle Hill, Magnetic Island and beyond will never be at risk of being built out, and the balcony spans the width of the apartment.“You’ll never get a building that’s made of that structural quality; with the hallways that big and the space so vast, because it was obviously made as an industrial property,” Ms Hart said.center_img The three-bedroom apartment features a bathroom for every bedroom, and a large living space for family time. It also includes a private office on the ground floor of the complex with connection to NBN, making it perfect for those wanting to work from home or operate a small team of staff.“There’s a fully kitted out office on the ground floor with private entry — so if you work for yourself or if you work from home or have staff that works really well.”“We work for ourselves so it was really-nice to be able to go downstairs to work.” Townsville’s cheapest suburbs More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020 No expense has been spared in complimenting the original art deco style of 604/53 Gregory Street. Price: $1.69 MillionBRIDGET Hart and Justin Cowell purchased this penthouse as a shell in 2015, and spent the next year and a half developing the plan and fitting it out. The heritage listed apartment was once part of the Townsville General Hospital, and still retains its original architectural features.No expense has been spared in complimenting the original art deco style of 604/53 Gregory Street, and the couple have made extra modifications to ensure this unit is a one-off. MORE REAL ESTATE NEWSlast_img read more


Tag: 夜上海论坛ZZ

first_imgView Gallery (2 Photos)Looking to rebound from a disappointing loss against Penn State last week, the Wisconsin women’s basketball team (15-5, 5-4) will begin the second half of the Big Ten season on the road as they travel to Indiana to face the Hoosiers (11-9, 4-5) Thursday night at Assembly Hall in Bloomington, Ind.Like the Badgers, the Hoosiers find themselves coming off a tough conference loss, having fallen 70-56 to the Michigan Wolverines last Sunday. Wisconsin, meanwhile, enjoyed a rare off weekend, and head coach Lisa Stone’s squad looks eager to get back to work against Indiana.“Our bye weekend came at a very good time,” Stone said. “We had the weekend, this weekend off to refresh and recharge and we’re looking forward to having very purposeful practices this week in preparation for Indiana, who’s a really good team.“They had a tough loss at Michigan [Sunday], but …every team in the Big Ten is good, and this second half, we hope, is even better than the first.”While Wisconsin has been the best defensive team in the conference for the majority of the season, currently allowing only 52.3 points per game, Indiana’s offensive attack will pose a challenge.Boasting the Big Ten’s fourth-best scoring offense, the Hoosiers have often relied on their offensive output, as defense has been their crux all year. Allowing 65.8 points per game and posting only a +2 scoring margin over opponents, Indiana finds itself second-worst in both conference categories.“From what I remember, and seeing them play this year, they’re a very quick team looking to run in transition,” senior guard Teah Gant said. “Very guard-heavy, and their guards are really good. Not very tall, so I think we need to really do well in that area, in that post.“We just have to make sure we play as a team, and not one person is guarding individually for our whole team.”Employing a three-guard starting lineup similar to that of the Badgers, the Hoosiers have relied on senior Jamie Braun and juniors Whitney Lindsay and Jori Davis — the team’s leading scorer — for much of their offensive production.“Their guard corps is very good,” Stone said, echoing Gant. “They will zone us the whole game, and it’s a very aggressive, matchup zone, so that’s something that we need to make sure that we attack, find good shots.”For Wisconsin, the Penn State loss saw arguably their worst offensive game of the year.By the end of the 54-43 defeat, the Badgers had posted season lows in points and field goal percentage. In order to return to the form that has seen two four-game win streaks this season, UW will have to rediscover the balanced scoring that characterized the offense throughout the first half of the Big Ten schedule.Junior guard Alyssa Karel has been the Badgers’ leading scorer for the past two years, and has contributed just shy of 14 points per game this season.Complementing her has been junior forward Tara Steinbauer and impressive freshman Taylor Wurtz, averaging 8.3 and 8.1 points per game, respectively. In addition, two other starters average seven-plus a game, while Gant contributes 5.9.“I think we just need to come out with the mentality that we still need to fight in every game,” Gant said. “I think we were down to like three minutes left in the [Penn State] game, and we just needed to come out with even more energy than we did in the first half. So we definitely just have to stick to our principles.”As always, Wisconsin’s principles have included stout defense and limited turnovers. Stone’s squad has posted the sixth-best scoring defense in the nation, and is fifth in the Big Ten in turnover margin at + 1.0. Against the Hoosier zone, taking care of the ball will be at a premium for the Badgers, as will be the aforementioned offensive production.“I think our shot selection can improve,” Stone said. “I think that we need to score more in the post. I thought we passed up some open looks [against Penn State], and those are things we can fix.“We had a film session that we educated our players as to things that they can work on. We move forward,” she continued. “It’s less about the Penn State game and more about how we respond going into the Indiana game, and that’s the full focus.”last_img read more