Greensky Bluegrass Welcomes Joshua Davis In Fayetteville [Photos]

Tag: 上海足浴kb汇总

first_imgGreensky Bluegrass strolled through George’s Majestic Lounge on Wednesday night in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The band’s development as a tight-knit, outstanding explosion of musicianship has been noted over the years as they’ve honed their craft since founding in 2000, and Wednesday night’s show proved why they are becoming one of the most talked about jamgrass acts in the scene.GSBG opened Wednesday’s show with a fast-paced “Into the Rafters,” which first appeared on their 2008 album Five Interstates. After an all-business dobro-mandolin duet, Anders Beck and mandolinist/lead vocalist Paul Hoffman closed it out, efficiently moving onto “The Four.” The track features a fantastic signature dobro lick, and some catchy lyrics: “I keep digging holes in someone else’s ditch; I’m looking for apples but they’re all in the trees. Somebody help me cause I can’t be saved; But I haven’t done anything I can’t name…” The backup vocals on the repeating chorus toward the end were a nice touch.Guitarist and vocalist Dave Bruzza took over on the mic for “Room Without a Roof,” a hearty, melancholy, wistful-feeling track. The song appears on the latest album, Shouted, Written Down & Quoted, released in September on the band’s label, Big Blue Zoo.After a rousing “Gumboots” and another new track called “Merely Avoiding,” Bruzza stepped back up to sing “Worried About the Weather,” revealing a sort of Dylan-esque vocal pattern. It felt comfortable, as his voice does; like the 30-year-old aural memory of your ultra-talented great uncle Who-Almost-Made-The-Bigtime-In-Nashville singing in the living room with your dad at midnight while you’re pretending to sleep upstairs.The instrumental jam in “Weather” was outstanding as well, with the mando and dobro volleying back and forth in a chemistry-packed pickin’ battle, tight as could be. The crescendo that culminated with full-group, high-speed pickin-heavy jam was exhilarating — the first of many similar instances during the night. Shortly after, the sound levels crept back down to just a dobro solo during which Beck flexed some muscle, showing off some mad skills and even incorporating some wah-wah pedal effects.After a short singalong on “Casual Wednesday,” the evening’s opening act, Joshua Davis from television’s “The Voice,” came out for a couple of songs. He played guitar on “Wild Bill Young,” and then also sang lead on “Last Winter in the Copper Country,” which turned into a 12-minute jam session and was enjoyable, while also a little different.The closer for GSBG’s 85-minute first set was “Can’t Stop Now,” played at breakneck pace with the banjo leading loud and proud on the fast rhythm and the mandolin stealing the spotlight with some great melodic licks. Hoffman, at this point, was fully in the moment; I daresay Ricky Skaggs would’ve been proud. Beck slayed again with a mean, extended dobro solo that felt reckless yet free, like driving down the highway with the windows down, hair all a mess, doing 95 MPH with no seatbelt.Second set kicked off with “What’s Left of the Night,” featuring great lead vocals by Hoffman, and Beck’s dobro standing out again, discreetly taking the lead in a song filled with longing and love. The banjo solo by Michael Arlen Bont on this track was excellent and thrilling; and then Beck took over again, and he busted out some new-for-this-night effects that had his dobro sounding more like Robert Randolph’s rock-and-roll-funk pedal steel. Hoffman followed it up with a psychedelic mando solo, playful but gentle as the song slowed down to a close after 14 minutes — the second-longest track of the evening.Next was a crowd-pleasing “Miss September,” followed by the traditional Stanley Brothers’ hit “Pig in a Pen,” made infamous through covers by Ricky Skaggs, Phish, Old and In the Way, Grateful Dead. Bruzza’s vocals sounded appropriately and impressively “Eastern Kentucky traditional mountain sound.”A couple songs later, GSBG’s “Break Mountain Brokedown” and its rhythmic, dance-inspiring lead melody, by primarily the dobro (and at times the guitar and the mando), mesmerized as much of the audience as any song managed to. The song featured a huge jam with pedals and some wah-wah and other funky dobro effects. Again, the dobro effects started getting more rock-and-roll toward the end of 15-minute long song, and it seamlessly blended into the beginning of a rocking rendition of “Walk Away” (by The James Gang/Joe Cocker). The guitar and dobro effects were perfect for the cover, particularly the driving rhythm and lead melody of the intro and chorus.Shortly after came the driving banjo leading on “Radio Blues,” featuring the best vocals of the night by Bruzza, with great enunciation and tone. The track included fascinating dobro and guitar solos that — even at this late point in the show — demanded closer attention and visual connection.Next came a quiet, gradual intro, as is typical, to GSBG crowd fave “Windshield.” The audience finally was quiet and paying close attention as Hoffman captured them with his voice. The last song of the second set was “Run or Die,” with some gritty, hard-rock dobro effects and guitar-pickin’ calisthenics, while the mandolin kept a fiery pace going on rhythm, even during a soft funky bass solo by Mike Devol. The solo grew into a driving, breakneck full-band jam led by Hoffman, channeling Jeff Austin / YMSB circa 2010 at Red Rocks: just going off, lost in his own internal high-speed-bluegrass universe.After revisiting the “this is the last Casual Wednesday” joke, the soulful, classic waltz encore kicked off, “Drink Up and Go Home,” which was originally recorded by Carl Perkins and later by Jimmy Martin, Bobby Bare, Jerry Garcia and David Grisman, among others. If anyone ever sounded more like they’ve suffered heartbreak when they sang this tune, I sure haven’t heard it. Hoffman’s voice is so rich with emotion; it is refreshing and particularly impressive when you see it at shows again and again. It was indeed beautiful, moving and even provocative. Then, they tripled their tempo for a 45-second wrap-up jam, closing out the number and the night on a string of energetic high notes.You can check out photos from Greensky’s performance last night, courtesy of Jeremy Scott, plus the setlist, below.Setlist: Greensky Bluegrass | George’s Majestic Lounge | Fayetteville, AR | 5/17/2017Set I: Into The Rafters, The Four, Room Without A Roof, Gumboots, Merely Avoiding, Worried About The Weather, *Casual Wednesday, *Wild Bill Jones, *Last Winter In Copper Country. Can’t Stop NowSet II: What’s Left Of The Night>Miss September, Pig In A Pen, Blood Sucking F(r)iends, Anders Banter Talk> Broke Mt. Breakdown>Walk Away>Down The Road>Broke Mt. Breakdown, The Radio Blues, Windshield, Run Or DieEncore: Casual Wednesday Reprise>Drink Up And Go Home>Broke Mt. Breakdown* with Joshua Davis Load remaining imageslast_img read more


Tag: 上海足浴kb汇总

first_imgSeven Premier League sides are in second round action in the EFL Cup tonight – and all face lower league opposition.The biggest chasm being bridged will be at the Crown Ground where League Two Accrington Stanley take on Premier League West Brom.There’s another meeting of top and bottom rungs as top flight newcomers Brighton take on Barnet. Elsewhere, Mick McCarthy’s Ipswich will fancy an upset at Crystal Palace,Harry Redknapp’s Birmingham face one of his old haunts, Bournemouth,Swansea make the trip to MK Dons,Leicester travel to Sheffield United,And Watford welcome Bristol City to Vicarage Road. Photo: Pixabaylast_img


Tag: 上海足浴kb汇总

first_img FOLLOW US Last Updated: 17th August, 2020 10:49 IST Jets Dealing With Injuries, Inexperience At ‘thin’ WR Group Breshad Perriman took off down the field and Sam Darnold saw him all the way. Written By LIVE TV First Published: 17th August, 2020 10:49 IST COMMENTcenter_img SUBSCRIBE TO US Associated Press Television News Breshad Perriman took off down the field and Sam Darnold saw him all the way.The ball zipped through the humid air and dropped right into Perriman’s hands for an impressive training camp practice touchdown.”Sam dropped a dime in there,” Perriman said Sunday, “and I was able to make the catch.”The New York Jets hope this is only a peek into what will be a season filled with highlights between Darnold and his developing but, for the moment, banged up group of wide receivers.“This receiving corps has a lot of unique traits,” Jamison Crowder said. “We’ve got size, we’ve got speed, bigger receivers. I think it’s going to be fun.”As long as they’re healthy, that is.Rookie Denzel Mims, the team’s second-round draft pick in April, has missed the first few practices of camp with a hamstring injury. He’s expected to be a key contributor this season, but coach Adam Gase acknowledged his on-field progress is being affected by every practice he can’t go.Vyncint Smith, who had 17 catches for 225 yards in an increased role in the offense late last season, is sidelined with a core muscle injury and is set to see a specialist to determine the next course of action.“Obviously, we’re a little thin right now,” Gase said. “We’ve got two guys that aren’t practicing.”That led to the Jets agreeing to terms on a contract Sunday with veteran receiver Chris Hogan, who was with Carolina last season but has also played with AFC East rivals Buffalo, Miami and New England.Crowder, who led New York with 78 catches last season, and Perriman, who broke out in the second half with Tampa Bay a year ago, are the only healthy starters. Other than Hogan and perhaps Braxton Berrios, the rest of the Jets’ receivers are a mix of unproven players trying to make their mark in the NFL. That group includes Jeff Smith, Josh Malone, Jehu Chesson, Lawrence Cager and George Campbell.“I like our young guys,” Gase said. “I like the way our guys developed. I think you’re always going to look at it as, hey, how do we improve. I mean that’s what Joe (Douglas) and his crew does. They’re always going to be looking to find somebody else to — if somebody is available that can help our team, they won’t be afraid to go get them.”For an offense that struggled mightily last year — New York ranked 27th in yards passing and last in total yards — the Jets need to bounce back in a big way.A lot of that is on Gase himself, and the coach has acknowledged he needs to use running back Le’Veon Bell more effectively. Douglas revamped the offensive line and the Jets will start five players in Week 1 who weren’t in the lineup in last year’s opener.Crowder said a “major X-factor” for the Jets’ passing game is the return of tight end Chris Herndon, who was limited to only one game last season because of a suspension and injuries.That should all help Darnold, who will be counted on to make a big leap in Year 3. But the lack of proven (or, healthy) receivers might make that a bit easier said than done. Darnold developed a good rapport with Robby Anderson over the past two seasons, but the receiver signed with Carolina in free agency.“All I know is that Robby had a great impact on our offense and he produced for us,” Darnold said. “I’m excited to have the guys that we have now, and guys are going to continue to learn this offense and grow within it. I’m just going to do my part in making sure that they understand what we have to do as an offense and where we go from here.”The speedy Perriman will almost certainly have plenty to do with that.After not living up to his lofty draft status as a first-round pick by Baltimore in 2015, Perriman was cut after training camp three years later. He signed with Washington, but was waived five days later and joined Cleveland in the middle of that season.Perriman signed with Tampa Bay last year and made the most of increased playing time because of injuries to Mike Evans and Chris Godwin. He finished with career bests in receptions (36), yards receiving (645) and touchdowns (six), with much of that production coming in the final month.“Last season was last season,” Perriman said. “It was a great run, but now I’m trying to tap into a whole other level.”He already likes what he has seen from Darnold, and their 50-yard touchdown play Sunday showed a glimpse of developing chemistry.“The touch he has is unreal,” Perriman said. “It’s so receiver friendly.” WATCH US LIVElast_img read more