House in Minoh-shinmachi / FujiwaraMuro Architects

Tag: 上海哪里找会所嫩模

first_imgSave this picture!© Katsuya. Taira+ 22Curated by Hana Abdel Share Projects Architects: FujiwaraMuro Architects Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/956647/house-in-minoh-shinmachi-fujiwaramuro-architects Clipboard Area:  75 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Japan Year:  Yoshio Muro “COPY” 2020 Photographs House in Minoh-shinmachi / FujiwaraMuro Architects Manufacturers: Grohe, NEW LIGHT POTTERY, Saint-Gobain CopyHouses•Minoo, Japan ArchDaily Lead Architects: ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/956647/house-in-minoh-shinmachi-fujiwaramuro-architects Clipboard House in Minoh-shinmachi / FujiwaraMuro ArchitectsSave this projectSaveHouse in Minoh-shinmachi / FujiwaraMuro Architects “COPY” City:MinooCountry:JapanMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Katsuya. TairaRecommended ProductsWindowsJansenWindows – Janisol PrimoWindowsOTTOSTUMM | MOGSWindow Systems – BronzoFinestra B40Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedText description provided by the architects. The clients approached our office at the beginning of their search for land on which to build a new home. Save this picture!© Katsuya. TairaSave this picture!Ground Floor PlanSave this picture!© Katsuya. TairaInitially they were looking in many types of neighborhood, but after several discussions with us, they focused on a new development surrounded by mountains. Deer could still be spotted walking on the streets. They found a site large enough to build a ranch-style house, and where they could imagine looking up and seeing mountains.Save this picture!© Katsuya. TairaThe design consists of a maze-like set of concrete walls covered with a roof to create the interior space. The purpose of the walls is to block visibility, and their structural requirements were the same both inside and outside, but outside rain falls and wind blows. Inside, rain and wind are blocked by the roof and exterior walls.Save this picture!© Katsuya. TairaSave this picture!Section ASave this picture!© Katsuya. TairaTypically when such walls extend inside, they are called partitions, but by creating the visual impression of an exterior wall that has come inside the house, we hoped to blur the boundaries between inside and outside. Inside, we wanted to create the feeling of being within a concrete maze. In terms of circulation routes, a number of small spaces are accessed via a living-dining area facing the garden.Save this picture!© Katsuya. TairaThese small rooms—including the master bedroom, children’s room, and home office—are partitioned by concrete walls, but the walls only reach head-high, with glass partitions above that, and the exposed roof beams span the various rooms. This prevents an enclosed or confined atmosphere, and makes the small rooms feel as if they are part of a larger whole. Save this picture!© Katsuya. TairaProject gallerySee allShow lessPavilion C, Tianan Cloud Park Science and Technology Pavilion / O-office ArchitectsSelected ProjectsAranya Equestrian Center / in:Flux architectureSelected Projects Share Houses Photographs:  Katsuya. Taira Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project CopyAbout this officeFujiwaraMuro ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesMinooOn FacebookJapanPublished on February 10, 2021Cite: “House in Minoh-shinmachi / FujiwaraMuro Architects” 09 Feb 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodGRP Siding Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardMetallicsHAVER & BOECKERArchitectural Wire Mesh – MULTI-BARRETTE 8130Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsSealantsEffisusGutter Repair – TiteGutter3Aluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Click-on BattensTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea PrestigeMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Click Roll CapsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteTerrealTerracotta Cladding TileDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE UnilateralWindowsJoskoWindows and Sliding Doors – ONE SeriesMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?大阪迷宫住宅Minoh-shinmachi / FujiwaraMuro Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more


Tag: 上海哪里找会所嫩模

first_img Melanie May | 18 December 2015 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Tagged with: Charity Website Research / statistics “Mobile was one of the things that surprised us the most in our findings. As the digital world is increasingly moving further towards mobile, and a huge amount of charity traffic comes through mobile social media app referrals, charities at the very least need to have a mobile-friendly website. As technology is taking over a lot of aspects in our everyday lives, the third sector mustn’t fall behind.” Charity sites failing on user experience says research Negative:Half of the sites did not have a positive experience on mobile devicesMany have an out-dated look and feelThe majority of sites have poor colour contrast, making it difficult to notice or see thingsMany of the websites have poor mega menusWhile most of the sites display financial information on how money is spent, it is not particularly easy to find.center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Third sector websites need to improve their usability, with lack of mobile friendliness a key issue, according to a report from digital agency Sigma.The third sector online experience – who’s hitting the mark? looks at top not-for-profit websites, and their overall usability, accessibility for all users, including those with physical, cognitive and visual disabilities, mobile-friendliness, and self-help functions.Ten sites were studied, and scored out of a possible 25. Citizen’s Advice performed the best, beating the average score of 13. The 10 websites and their scores were: Citizens Advice (19), The Prince’s Trust (17), Victim Support (16.5), British Medical Association (16.5), Age UK (15.5), Step Change (13) War Child (11), Trafford Housing Trust (11), Business in the Community (BITC) (10), and SportsAid (9).The research found that the majority of the sites tested have taken steps to become more accessible, and seven out of ten of the sites had a good readability score. However, half of the sites had poor colour contrast, and only two out of ten contained captions on their online videos. In terms of usability, half of the websites didn’t contain an HTML sitemap, or easy-to-use navigation bars.While mobile donations are growing, only three of the ten sites had a specific mobile application, with just two having a responsive website, and three having an adaptive one. In addition, only 40% of the sites were finger friendly. Only two of the websites had their own app, and four lacked mobile-friendly layouts.The key, common factors found across all ten sites reviewed were:Positive:The majority have taken steps to make the website more accessibleThose that allow users to donate through them demonstrate this clearly on the siteThe majority of content on the sites is useful and informativeMost of the sites highlight where the user is in the site structure through breadcrumbs on the menu Hilary Stephenson, managing director at Sigma, said: Advertisement  56 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more