Exclusive: This is why Purplebricks failed in Australia, explains portal executive

Tag: 上海品茶都怎么是工作室

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Exclusive: This is why Purplebricks failed in Australia, explains portal executive previous nextAgencies & PeopleExclusive: This is why Purplebricks failed in Australia, explains portal executiveA senior figure from the the country’s property industry reveals in a video interview why he believes Purplebricks failed so spectacularly in Oz.Nigel Lewis25th September 201902,804 Views As Purplebricks finishes closing its business in Australia at an estimated cost of £41 million, one of the country’s senior property industry figures has said that its biggest mistake was to ‘go hard on price’.Steve Carroll (pictured above), who is Director of Industry Relations at the Oz equivalent to Rightmove, the REA Group, says Purplebricks misunderstood the strong emotional attachment to property in Australia.“It was black and white – you can save money by using Purplebricks,” he says in an interview with Chris Watkins given exclusively to The Negotiator.“That didn’t resonate with Australians because people in Oz don’t mind giving an agent 2-3% of the sale value if the agent does a really good job of selling their property for a premium price, but I don’t think Purplebricks fully understood that.”AuctionsHe also explains in the video (see below) that, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne, many homes are sold via auction, a service that Purplebricks didn’t offer.Carroll also accuses the company of not doing its homework before entering the Australian housing market, and that he doesn’t believe the company sought advice from anyone prior to its launch in August 2016, including anyone at REA.In May this year Purplebricks announced it had lost $18 million during the first half of its financial year to October 2018 and new CEO Vic Darvey subsequently announced it would close the business, citing ‘market conditions’ as the main cause. It currently has 151 properties still awaiting a buyer and 70 agents featured on its website.Watch the video: steve carroll Purplebricks Rightmove Purplebricks Australia REA Group September 25, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more


Tag: 上海品茶都怎么是工作室

first_imgVINTON, Iowa – Several further clarifications have been announced to 2017 rules initially released by IMCA in November.A left front take-up spring will now be allowed in the Late Model division.The maximum spoiler width was increased from 72 to 72-1/2 inches while the maximum diagonal measurement from the center of the rear axle to the top of the interior deck was upped from 52 to 54 inches.No tolerance will be allowed in measuring either dimension, emphasized IMCA President Brett Root.Wording regarding standard weight axles tubes has also been added for Late Models and Modifieds and Root said drivers in both divisions should read those rules again.The rule implemented during the 2016 season allowing a claim/exchange for Stock Cars with the 350 cfm carburetor option but not the 500 cfm option will be continued.And wording allowing flat milling on the combustion side of the head only in the Stock class has been removed.“With the PRI trade show held after the release of our rules and proof reading by our 8,000-plus members, several issues came up that necessitated these clarifications,” Root said.last_img read more


Tag: 上海品茶都怎么是工作室

first_imgShare Related Articles StumbleUpon Share Submit Andrey Astapov, ETERNA LAW: Ukraine faces critical choices as gambling finish line nears August 21, 2020 Duma approves overhaul of Russian sports betting laws  July 23, 2020 Uzbekistan opens consultation for launch of national lottery July 20, 2020 Ilya Machavariani – Dentons CISMarket developments in the CIS region have shot to the forefront of the industry’s agenda, as an intense July saw Ukraine approve its Gambling Law mandate, the Russian Duma announce an overhaul of sports betting laws and taxes, whilst Uzbekistan forms a counsel for the development of a national lottery.  At the coalface of rapid developments,  Ilya Machavariani, Head of Russia and CIS Gambling and Gaming Practices for international law firm Dentons, tells SBC that stakeholders must acknowledge and understand intricate cultural and geopolitical dynamics which shape how legislations are formed and adopted.___________________SBC: Ilya thanks for this interview. Leading Dentons Eastern European practice group you have been a very busy man under lockdown. Why has this been a period of  ‘movement and disruption’ for the CIS region with regards to adopting new gambling legislations? Ilya Machavariani (Head of Dentons CIS ): I believe that existing movements in this region is a part of the bigger process of governments of jurisdictions around the world finally realising that it is impossible to combat offshore gambling and the only way forward is to regulate it.Zooming into CIS, I also believe that it was a matter of time until the regulations here will catch up with incredibly talented and proficient gambling practitioners originating from this part of Europe. It was imminent that all this expertise will finally leak out to high cabinets.To add to that, I also think that current international attention to these markets is partly a result of an existing knowledge gap between international betting and gaming community and ex-USSR territories. Honestly speaking, sometimes I have a feeling that amount of non-CIS betting professionals’ knowledge about more conventional markets surpasses their understanding of markets over here to the great extent. There are perfectly legitimate reasons for that: a language barrier, cultural, business, and political differences requiring anyone entering this territory to adjust to them, unclear regulations (sometimes) and general otherness of these markets.SBC: The CIS is formed of many young nations, redeveloping their commercial structures and identities. How is this dynamic going to shape how betting laws are adapted and interpreted? IM: I would not say that CIS nations could be qualified as “young” anymore. Decades passed since the fall of communism and these decades were really eventful and each nation pursued its own way during these years.Consequently, each nation came up with and preserved its own approach to the betting laws. Some prefer to use neighbour’s legislation as a template for its very own laws (for instance, curios researcher might see that Kazakhstan’s betting legislation is relatively close to a Russian one), some are looking for their unique way (e.g. Russia, Belarus, and Georgia, which have created legislation aimed at attracting foreign investments), some decide to look at well-known jurisdictions and mix foreign approach with local trends and ideas (e.g. Ukraine, Uzbekistan).SBC: Observing the Ukraine which is governed by a novice first-time government. Can it really, therefore, fulfil a full-scale gambling agenda by the end 2020? IM: I am always cautious about timelines when it comes to Ukraine as I do not want to create additional heat around the topic that is already really hot – my main desire is to keep everyone informed with the most accurate information possible in the circumstances; nevertheless I believe that if Ukrainian Gambling Commission (that is still yet to be formed as of July 2020) would accept first applications this year, it would be simultaneously encouraging and a bit surprising.If this scenario presents itself then Ukrainian government deserves an “A” for its efforts to go all the way through from complete gambling ban to the regulated market in less than two years.SBC: Are CIS states, therefore, conflicted in whether to adopt an open market framework or subsequently choose a monopoly structure for their gambling laws? IM: I would not say that there is a conflict or even any dispute in terms of this choice. As the reasoning behind adoption of gambling legislation is usually revolves around the governments’ attempts to increase revenues, it is counterproductive (to say the least) to create a regulated, but monopolised betting market.Of course, it may be argued that this approach allows the government to keep the industry on a short lead, but, in my opinion, such method is really blunt and simple; it is also might show lack of initiative from the government’s side, which is always discouraging.To add to that, as mentioned earlier, this territory is a homeland for lots and lots brilliant specialists who are eager to familiarize governments with a modern state of the industry, latest trends and best approaches that could be used to establish an open, competitive and fair market (provided that such brilliant specialists do not feel that they would be able to control this monopoly).SBC: Criticism has been lobbied at CIS states for not following western protocols in adopting gambling legislation… Is this a fair narrative? IM: This is a fair narrative indeed. But the reasons for this narrative might be surprising for you as this approach of CIS states has nothing to do with a possible biased point of view of the ex-Soviet governments on the western models.I told you before about my feeling that there is a knowledge gap between the international community and post-soviet markets, but this is not the only existing gap of such sort. Sometimes, when governments in the CIS are starting to legalise gambling or modify outdated legislation, they are not actively seeking help or assistance from the industry. It is really unusual for CIS states to conduct official consultations or engage outside specialists that could bring valuable expertise to the table.On the contrary, Ukraine and Russia are going a different way here as Ukrainian authorities have engaged a vast network of lawyers and gambling executives in order for them to assist in the preparation of the gambling law; in the meantime, Russian government has formed a separate expert group that has representation from each and every level of the Russian market – operators, regulator (and other involved state bodies), self-regulated organisations (their purpose is to oversee operators), lawyers (such as myself) and payments organisations.On reflection, latest changes to the Russian laws were not reviewed by this expert group and were adopted without any consultations with the market – in other words, mechanism of involvement of experts still requires some modifications (but I hope that Russia is getting somewhere).Despite Ukrainian and Russian efforts, the usual outcome of government’s passive approach is that preparation of the gambling legislation falls down on the shoulders of people who might be not familiar with gambling industry at all; therefore it is really hard to criticize them for not knowing latest Maltese or UK or European developments.SBC: So finally, following months of Lockdown, how do you see CIS developments playing out – what timelines and developments should industry stakeholders anticipate? IM: Well, I do not want to chart CIS states as all of them are important for me and I really care for each country’s movement towards modern gambling market, but if we would focus on the legislative developments in this region, I would say that you need to keep a weather eye out for further developments and market opening in Ukraine (late 2020 – early 2021), first steps towards betting legalisation in Uzbekistan (late 2020 – mid-2021; this market might compete with Ukraine if the course of legalisation stays the same), and unexpected changes in Russia (literally anytime when the State Duma is not in recess)._____________________ Ilya Machavariani – Dentons – Head of Russia and CIS Gambling and Gaming Practiceslast_img read more


Tag: 上海品茶都怎么是工作室

first_img Source: BBC Barcelona forward Lionel Messi has won the Ballon d’Or award for the world’s best player for a record sixth time.It is the 32-year-old Argentine’s first Ballon d’Or since 2015 and comes after he scored 54 times for club and country in 2018-19, in which Barca won La Liga.Virgil van Dijk was second – one of four Liverpool players in the top seven, including Sadio Mane in fourth.Juventus and Portugal forward Cristiano Ronaldo, who has won the award five times, was third in the voting.England defender Lucy Bronze was beaten to the women’s award, finishing second behind Megan Rapinoe, who was Golden Ball winner as USA claimed a second successive World Cup in 2019.Liverpool keeper Alisson won the inaugural Yashin Trophy for best goalkeeper, ahead of Barcelona’s Germany international Marc-Andre ter Stegen and Brazilian compatriot Ederson of Manchester City.Defender Matthijs de Ligt took the Kopa Trophy, awarded to the best under-21 player and selected by former Ballon d’Or winners.The 20-year-old, who joined Juventus this summer after helping Ajax reach the semi-finals of last season’s Champions League, beat Borussia Dortmund and England forward Jadon Sancho to the award.The full list1. Lionel Messi (Barcelona and Argentina)2. Virgil van Dijk (Liverpool and Netherlands)3. Cristiano Ronaldo (Juventus and Portugal)4. Sadio Mane (Liverpool and Senegal)5. Mohamed Salah (Liverpool and Egypt)6. Kylian Mbappe (Paris St-Germain and France)7. Alisson (Liverpool and Brazil)8. Robert Lewandowski (Bayern Munich and Poland)9. Bernardo Silva (Manchester City and Portugal)10. Riyad Mahrez (Manchester City and Algeria)11. Frenkie de Jong (Barcelona and Netherlands)12. Raheem Sterling (Manchester City and England)13. Eden Hazard (Real Madrid and Belgium)14. Kevin de Bruyne (Manchester City and Belgium)15. Matthijs de Ligt (Juventus and Netherlands)16. Sergio Aguero (Manchester City and Argentina)17. Roberto Firmino (Liverpool and Brazil)18. Antoine Griezmann (Barcelona and France)19. Trent Alexander-Arnold (Liverpool and England)20= Dusan Tadic (Ajax and Serbia)20= Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang (Arsenal and Gabon)22. Son Heung-min (Tottenham and South Korea)23. Hugo Lloris (Tottenham and France)24= Kalidou Koulibaly (Napoli and Senegal)24= Marc-Andre ter Stegen (Barcelona and Germany)28= Donny van de Beek (Ajax and Netherlands)28= Joao Felix (Atletico Madrid and Portugal)28= Marquinhos (Paris St-Germain and Brazil)last_img read more