Oriel grad replaces Countdown’s Vorderman

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first_imgAn Oxford graduate has been selected as Carol Vorderman’s replacement on the popular daytime TV show Countdown.22 year old Rachel Riley has been selected as the new co-presenter alongside TV sports presenter Jeff Stelling.Riley, a graduate from Oriel with a Masters Degree in Mathematics, was selected for the Channel 4 programme from over 1,000 applicants.For the auditions, she and other applicants had to complete an interview and were examined on their maths expertise.Riley was shortlisted together with 5 other candidates to attend a screen test in Leeds where candidates had to put up several letters selections and tackle various maths games at the numbers board.Riley announced that she was ecstatic to have been chosen for the job. She said, “this is the best graduate job in the world. There’s only one cool maths job around and I was lucky enough to get it so I’m absolutely thrilled.”Channel 4 said, “Rachel’s on-screen presence, easy going nature, coupled with fantastic maths skills meant she excelled in all rounds of the auditions.”Helen Warner, Head of Channel 4 Daytime, said “I’m very excited that Jeff and Rachel will be picking up the Countdown baton from 2009.“They make a great team and I feel certain that our much-loved words and numbers game will go from strength to strength with them at the helm.”Long-standing Carol Vorderman announced on the 25th July 2008 that she would be quitting the show after failing to agree with Channel 4’s terms for a new contract.Reports have suggested that she was told to take a 90% pay cut of her estimated salary of between £900,000 and £1m a year.Vorderman recorded her last Countdown show on the 13th November 2008 which will be broadcast on the 12th December this year.Stelling, who will be the new host for Countdown, is best known for presenting Soccer Saturday on Sky Sports and was awarded Sports Broadcaster of the Year by the Sports Journalists’ Association for the third consecutive time earlier this year.He declared that, “I am delighted to be hosting Countdown and follow in the footsteps of such great broadcasters as Richard Whitely, Des Lynam and Des O’Connor.”Stelling and Riley are set to present the 60th series of Countdown, which will commence in January 2009.last_img read more


Tag: 上海品茶资源

first_imgCompetition keeps population downThat hasn’t been the case. Ipser has found that native antspecies actually help keep down fire ant populations by competingwith them.UGA entomologists now plan to compare chemical pesticidetreatments to determine how they affect both native ant and fireant populations.”People need to realize that killing all ants isn’t the bestmethod from an environmental or an economical standpoint,” Ipsersaid. “Conserving forests is one of several variables that willhelp control fire ants, too. Overall, management of pests needsto be more biologically than chemically based.”When buying pesticides to kill ants or any other insects, hesaid, select a product that’s been formulated for that insect.”For fire ants, make sure the pesticide is targeted for exoticants,” he said. Fire ants like open areasSo does this explain why fire ant mounds are commonly seen inopen areas like pastures?”When the environment is simplified, like in clear-cut, openfields, there are fewer species due to fewer available niches,”Ipser said. “Native ants don’t thrive in that kind ofenvironment, and fire ants do.”Fire ants naturally thrive in open environments because there’sless competition from native ants that prefer woodedenvironments, he said.In wooded areas, fire ants have to fight against other antspecies when foraging for food and establishing nesting sites,Ipser said.”When fire ants were first found in the United States, everyonethought they were going to wipe out all other ant species becausetheir natural enemies were back home in South America,” he said. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaIf you decide to take a hike through the Georgia wilderness, youmay have to fight off ticks and chiggers along the way. But arecent University of Georgia study shows you shouldn’t have toworry about fire ants.Reid Ipser, an entomology graduate student with the UGA Collegeof Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, recently completed astudy of ant habitats. For a year, he scouted sites in Georgia’sIndian Springs and High Falls state parks.”The state parks were the perfect locations for this study asthey contain both open fields and undisturbed wooded areas,”Ipser said.He collected ant species for a year and was surprised to findthat he never caught a red imported fire ant in a wooded testsite. Yet he collected native ants in abundance in the woodedtest sites.In the open-field test sites, Ipser collected many more fire antsthan native ants.center_img Don’t kill all antsIf you have ants in your lawn that aren’t fire ants and aren’tcoming indoors, Ipser suggests leaving them alone.”If the circumference of the ant bed is the size of a quarter ora silver dollar, they aren’t pest ants,” he said. “These don’tcause ecological damage. They don’t sting. But they do competewith exotic ants like fire ants and Argentine ants.”Like the red imported fire ant, the Argentine ant is an exoticant. But it doesn’t sting.”If you find little black ants in your dishwasher, they are mostlikely Argentine ants,” Ipser said. Argentine ants typically nestnear the trunks of trees and don’t create high mounds.last_img read more


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first_imgRystad Energy: North American oil and gas bankruptcy debt likely to top $100 billion this year FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Kallanish Energy:The debt from North American oil and natural gas bankruptcies has already reached an all-time high in 2020 and it will get even bigger in the last two months of the year, Kallanish Energy has learned.To date, there have been 84 Chapter 11 filings in 2020 among exploration and production firms and oilfield services firms, down from the historical high of 142 in 2016, Rystad Energy said in a new report based on the Chapter 11 data from the Haynes and Boone law firm. But the debt associated with those 2020 filings is $89 billion, $19 billion more than in 2016, it said.The cumulative debt is expected to top $100 billion this year, it said.The average debt per company in 2020 has been $1.05 billion, almost twice as much as the 2017 level of $576 million, it said. The average debt for E&Ps [exploration and production companies] this year has been $1.34 billion and $792 million for OFS [oil field services firms].“Yet we argue that the number of filings will still remain above the level recorded in 2019 over the next two years, as the industry keeps navigating through the challenging market environment,” said Artem Abramov, head of shale research at Rystad Energy, in a statement.The debt from the 55 E&Ps that have filed for Chapter 11 in 2020 is about $54 billion, it said. That number of bankruptcy filings could reach 61 before Dec. 31 with a total projected debt of $69 billion, it said. The number of Chapter 11 E&P filings is projected to be 54 in 2021 and 45 in 2022, assuming $40 WTI and $3 Henry Hub prices. That total debt will be $44 billion in 2021 and $32 billion in 2022.More: Record high Chapter 11 debt in 2020: Rystad Energylast_img read more


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first_imgSometimes, things just naturally run in the family.Take the case of UW track and field member Jessica Jeremiah.Jeremiah never really competed in track and field until high school, but when looking at her family genes, there was no doubt she would eventually find her way out to the track.The daughter of Asele Woy — a 1980 Olympian for Nigeria’s 4×400 relay team — Jeremiah took after her mother. But it wasn’t because her mother pressed it on her as a kid.”She never really taught me a lot about track growing up,” Jeremiah said. “I knew what track was and ran races in elementary school and stuff like that, but then high school was when I really started competing.”Jeremiah’s mom never really boasts about her Olympic feats, either.”She’s really modest about it, but you can tell she knows a lot about track,” Jeremiah said. “We know her stats and all that, but she doesn’t talk about how she did. She just talks about how she ran and what her motivation was and all that kind of stuff.”For Jeremiah, her biggest motivation is her mother.As Jeremiah continues to adjust to the jump to the competition at the college level, as well as academics, she knows she can always turn to her mother.Not only is Asele a loving and caring mother, but also she knows what Jeremiah is going through out on the track as she, too, went through the same struggle.”She’s great,” Jeremiah said. “She’s always very supportive and calls before every meet and just asks how I’m doing.”But my brother’s also very supportive, too.”Jeremiah and her brother — Idiato — grew up always racing against each other. Any time, anywhere.”When we were little we raced against each other and people on the playground and stuff like that.”But Jeremiah was never able to beat her brother, ever.”When I was little, I was a lot closer to him,” she said. “He’s kind of better than me now, a lot better, actually.”While Jeremiah made her decision to attend UW, “Idi” decided to leave their Milwaukee home for Johnson County Community College in Kansas.However, there’s a strong possibility that the two siblings could someday be reunited on the track as Idi is seeking to transfer to a Big Ten school after his first two years at junior college, maybe even Wisconsin.”He’s very into track,” Jeremiah said of her brother. “He wants to be in the Big Ten and it’d be nice if he transferred here.”It wouldn’t be much of a surprise to men’s track and field head coach Ed Nuttycombe, either, as he actually recruited Jeremiah’s brother coming out of high school — and deservedly so.Idiato Jeremiah was a standout in track and football at Nathan Hale High School (West Allis, Wis.) and was the state runner-up in the 100- and 200-meter events his senior year.But regardless of her family ties, Jeremiah’s only focus right now is improvement.The sprinter/jumper is concentrating almost exclusively on the triple-jump event right now and is hoping to hit a personal goal of 40-feet this outdoor season.”I haven’t hit my [personal record of 38-8 3/7 in high school] yet, but I’ve been a little more consistent, I got stronger, and my runway’s better,” she said. “Everything’s better, it’s just that I’m kind of stuck at this one point.”I’m just looking to put everything together and put a 40-foot jump out there pretty soon.”Judging by the way things worked out for her mother, it wouldn’t surprising to see Jeremiah hit her goal sometime soon and jump to new heights.last_img read more