Month: June 2021

Month: June 2021

first_imgCARDIFF, WALES – MARCH 10: Wales winger Shane Williams in action during Wales training at the Millennium Stadium on March 10, 2011 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) “I’m back and fit again but I want to be quicker than I’ve ever been and we think that is possible,” added Williams. “It’s strange but, at 34 years old with 79 caps, I’m realising that I haven’t been running properly and that if I can pick up a few different things I can be quicker. That’s brilliant news for a rugby player, everyone wants to be quicker, from the forwards through to the backs, but if I can achieve that at this stage in my career then I’ll be really happy.“But I’ve got plenty of competition with the likes of George North doing the same training and apparently testing pretty highly. We haven’t done the sprint test yet and I don’t think I’m quite up to top speed yet myself after the injury, but it will be interesting to see who is the fastest. I’m not going to make any claims though, I’ll do my talking on the track when the time comes.” Shane Williams happyto be back in trainingShane Williams is back, ready and raring to go, but he admits he is taking nothing for granted in his bid to be selected for his third Rugby World Cup squad.The Wales record try scorer and the only Welshman to have won the prestigious IRB World Player of the year award (2008) has made a full recovery from the knee injury which cut his 6 Nations tournament short earlier this year.Williams, like the rest of his international colleagues, is half-way through the first of two RWC skills and fitness training camps in Poland, under the guidance of head coach Warren Gatland, backs coach Rob Howley, forwards specialist Robin Mcbryde, skills coach Neil Jenkins and defense expert Shaun Edwards.The Ospreys flyer says he is pleased to be taking it all in his stride. “This is the first proper running I’ve done since the injury in March,” said Williams, who, like the rest of his colleagues, is packing at least two normal day’s training into one 14 hour period each day on the camp, with the aid of Cryotherapy chambers.“But I’m back doing everything the rest of the squad are doing, working hard on both skills and the conditioning side of things here in Poland, and I’m feeling good. All I need to do next is catch-up with them because the boys have been training really hard.“The cryotherapy will kick-start that process though and, contrary to some of the other boys, I actually don’t mind it. We are down to -140C, which is severe cold, that’s low enough to have actually given some of the boys cold burns on their skin.“But it is mentally tough as much as anything else, you have to tell yourself it’s doing you good. It’s colder than I’ve ever been before, but for me I’d rather be cold than be cold and wet as well in the ice baths.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Williams scored two tries in this year’s RBS Six Nations Championship before picking up a knee injury in the home win over Ireland on 12th March, taking his all-time international total to 55 (if you include his two British and Irish Lions scores). He is easily Wales’ leading try scorer 13 ahead of second place Gareth Thomas (40) and the only non-kicker in the top six all-time leading scorers for his country.But, at 34 years-old, he claims he is still learning new tricks and refuses to take selection for his third RWC tournament for granted.“I’m always looking over my shoulder, we have some good youngsters coming through, but I’m not ready to let go yet,” continued Williams. “I’m playing catch up at little bit at the moment because I obviously haven’t been able to run since March, but I know I can’t relax for a second.“I’ve got it all to prove again now and I hope to be able to play in each of those summer internationals (England home and away and Argentina home) and be able to stake my case. No one goes to a World Cup on reputation and I wouldn’t want to be there myself if that was the case. We are looking to peak as a squad towards the end of August, physically and also as a team, and I want to make sure I do that personally as well.”Williams has been working on a one to one basis in Spala with athletics expert Frans Bosch (the biomechanics professor currently seconded to the squad) as well as taking a full part in the fitness regime designed by WRU head of physical performance Adam Beard and daily skills sessions lead by coaches Gatland, Howley, Edwards, Mcbryde and Jenkins.last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img“Scotland need to play at their best all the time to win, so our fans are hugely important. They were phenomenal in that 2006 victory and got louder and louder. When you play France you have to expect the unexpected. They’re a big, physical team with huge men but they don’t always play like that. They can play a quick game and always use the ball well.“They’ve got a new coach and though some people will say it was a positive that they got to the World Cup final, they’ll want to draw a line in the sand. Despite their positive result, it’s still a mystery about the atmosphere in their squad at that time.“Scotland need to start well and put France under pressure. And they will also have to defend very well in that game.” PARIS, FRANCE – FEBRUARY 05: Richie Gray of Scotland attempts to break through the French defences during the RBS 6 Nations Championship match between France and Scotland at the Stade De France on February 5, 2011 in Paris, France. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Richie Gray breaks through the French defences during a 2011 Six Nations matchScotland host France in round three of the Six Nations in what promises to be a feisty encounter at Murrayfield, writes Bea Asprey.The last time the Scots came out on top in the fixture was on the opening weekend of the 2006 tournament, when France went in as heavy favourites. Chris Paterson scored ten of Scotland’s points in a 20-16 win that day, but there was no time to savour the achievement.“It was the first game and it was played on a Sunday, and we came from under the radar,” says Paterson, the Scots’ only Test centurion. “There were some changes and new caps in the France team, and we were the more settled side on the day.“We scored two tries, one of which was from a lineout, and that set the tone for a confrontational game. We were playing in Cardiff six days later so there was no hint of a celebration.”Paterson recently retired from Test rugby, so he’ll be watching the action from what he hopes will be a packed stand. The presence of a 16th man would be a great fillip to the team in what the Edinburgh man knows will be a very tough game. Starting XV:15 Stuart Hogg14 Rory Lamont13 Sean Lamont12 Graeme Morrison11 Lee Jones10 Greig Laidlaw9 Mike Blair1 Allan Jacobsen2 Ross Ford (CAPTAIN)3 Geoff Cross4 Richie Gray5 Jim Hamilton6 John Barclay7 Ross Rennie8 David DentonReplacements:16 Scott Lawson17 Ed Kalman18 Alastair Kellock19 Richie Vernon20 Chris Cusiter21 Duncan Weir22 Nick De Luca LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_imgWhat you need to know about Ireland’s 37-27 win over Wales at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin Eye the line: Jacob Stockdale scores Ireland’s opening try against Wales (Getty Images) Ireland – Tries: Stockdale 2, Aki, Leavy, Healy. Cons: Sexton 2, Carbery. Pens: Sexton, Murray.Wales – Tries: G Davies, Shingler, Evans. Cons: Halfpenny 3. Pens: Halfpenny 2. Ireland 37-27 Wales Talking PointsIreland v Wales games are traditionally tight and this one was no exception, the excitement lasting until the final minute. Yet when reflecting on this Six Nations game, the hosts should have been comfortable winners at the Aviva Stadium.They completely dominated the territory (75%) and possession (69%) statistics but were unable to make their advantage tell consistently – and maybe even lifted their foot off the pedal slightly after scoring the bonus-point try midway through the second half.They should have had a far greater advantage than the 15-13 one they took into the break such was their dominance, but it was their own errors that proved costly and they only had that lead after Bundee Aki had stretched for the line in the closing minutes of the half and Johnny Sexton had slotted the conversion.Related: Six Nations bonus pointsIreland started the second period on their mettle and secured the try bonus after 55 minutes with scores from Dan Leavy and Cian Healy.Arm’s length: Bundee Aki stretches for the line to score Ireland’s second try (Getty Images)That Wales then narrowed the gap to seven points through Aaron Shingler’s 62nd-minute try was a testament to the visitors’ desire and resilience for Ireland surely should have been out of sight by that point.And even when Conor Murray slotted a penalty to take Ireland’s lead to ten points, Wales hit back with a Steff Evans try.Jacob Stockdale, who had touched down at the start of the game, had the final say with an interception try as Wales looked for a winning score and that summed up just how crazy this match was, ebbing and flowing in all directions. And it was brilliant to see two sides committed to playing attacking, ball-in-hand rugbyTwo things we learnt – Ireland are making hard work of winning; Wales are an extremely difficult side to kill off as they keep coming back! In fact, they were unlucky not to finish with a losing bonus point in the end.Here are the big talking points from the game…Missed opportunitiesJohnny Sexton didn’t get any points on the board until the 35th minute, missing three kicks at goal in succession for the first time since 2010, when he was off-target with four for Leinster against Scarlets (stat courtesy of Stuart Farmer!).The Ireland fly-half may have been controlling matters with ball in hand but he didn’t look all that comfortable when putting his boot to it, perhaps a symptom of the back injury that caused him to miss part of the captain’s run the previous day.He found his groove towards the end of the half, slotting a penalty and a conversion to give Ireland that 15-13 lead.On target: Leigh Halfpenny kicks a penalty at the Aviva Stadium (Getty Images)Yet it wasn’t just Sexton’s kicking that made life difficult for Ireland. Their inability to look after the ball in Wales’ half saw several other opportunities wasted as the visitors were able to snaffle possession and clear pressure – or create pressure of their own.After 20 minutes, Ireland had 70% possession and 81% territory but were only 5-3 up! That was as much down to Ireland’s own errors as anything Wales did.Power gameIreland started the second half with a bang – much like the fireworks that greeted the teams’ arrival on the pitch before kick-off – and the increase in intensity brought tries for Dan Leavy and Cian Healy within the first 15 minutes. The forwards were able to overpower Wales from close range and their maul became a more prominent feature of proceedings.As Warren Gatland said: “What Ireland are good at is squeezing sides and they squeezed us today.”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It is the statistics that show why Ireland should have won this fixture far more comfortably as they dominated every area: 166 ball carries to Wales’ 74; 457 metres made to Wales’ 251; 93 tackles made to Wales’ 175. No wonder Alun Wyn Jones used the word “sapping” afterwards.Pass masterThe game was still in single digits for minutes when Johnny Sexton fired a beautifully crisp, long, flat pass in front of Wales’ rush defence, missing out two team-mates and finding the grateful hands of Jacob Stockdale on the wing. It made the speed of the defensive line in red an irrelevance and Stockdale had a clear run for the line from five metres out to score his seventh try in seven Tests.Playmaker: Johnny Sexton was in the thick of action against Wales (Getty Images)In the lead-up to Ireland’s second try Sexton produced another sublime pass, releasing Cian Healy with an inside ball, and then one of his trademark loops with Chris Farrell gained his side a few extra metres before Bundee Aki stretched for the line.Sexton’s boot may have been off-target early on but his distribution was en pointe. We saw his feisty side, too, as he looked to barge over from close range, making a couple of metres to help set up Cian Healy’s try, later won a breakdown turnover and took a quick tap penalty rather than opting for the safer option of the posts.That tap may have come to nothing but the intent was there and Joe Schmidt revealed Sexton had highlighted at half-time that Wales were turning their backs at penalties and in that instance he was clearly looking to take advantage.Paying the penaltyWithin ten minutes, Wales had given away as many penalties as they did in the whole match against England. By half-time, Aaron Shingler had matched that Twickenham tally (two) on his own.Related: England 12-6 Wales match reportWales could not get on the right side of referee Glen Jackson, particularly at the contact area, and that meant they could not build momentum. They conceded none penalties across the 80 minutes to Ireland’s four.Gareth Davies showed a lovely sidestep to score his try but in reality it was Wales’ only try-scoring opportunity of the half. They were second best in all facets and struggled to retain possession long enough to break down the green wall or create chances.Hot stepper: Gareth Davies dives over for Wales’ first-half try (Getty Images)New facesMuch of the discussion in the build-up was of the return of three Lions for Wales and the absence of three Lions for Ireland. Yet it was a couple of lesser-known names that so impressed here.Chris Farrell, who was Man of the Match, may have been playing in only his third Test but he made notable impacts in attack and defence, his work-rate matching that of Dan Leavy in the back row. Leavy was another who popped up all over the pitch, offering himself as a carrier and making telling tackles – he topped Ireland’s tackle charts with 12 while Farrell was second with eight.Green giant: Chris Farrell impressed in only his third Test for Ireland (Getty Images)Andrew Porter may not match Tadhg Furlong’s skills in open play but he did a fine job at the scrum to show that Ireland are building more depth to the squad, just as Wales have done with the form of Josh Navidi and Aaron Shingler in this championship. It was Navidi who provided the scoring pass for Shingler in Dublin.Jump to it: Aaron Shingler impressed at the lineout and scored a try (Getty Images)Poor PatchSpare a thought for Rhys Patchell. He started the first two games at fly-half but was left out of the match-day 23 for this encounter following the return of Dan Biggar.Yet he was still in Dublin as a travelling reserve and took part in the warm-up – and then, once the match squad returned to the changing room for their final preparations, Patchell had to do a series of sprints and fitness drills on the pitch.last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img Beauden Barrett Sets Fitness Record In First Blues Training SessionThe Auckland Blues and New Zealand fly-half appears to have returned to rugby training in peak physical condition as shown by his personal best and record setting run in what is known as the Bronco test.The Auckland Blues returned to training ahead of the upcoming Super Rugby Aotearoa campaign with the backs going to their Alexandra Park base in Epsom to do a fitness test. Barrett, a player known for his quickness and turn of speed, completed the drill in four minutes and 12 seconds, which was a new club record.The rest of the backs are clearly in fine physical form, too, as Barrett was only a couple of seconds ahead of scrum-half Jonathan Ruru, and their were eight personal best times set in the test.“PB [personal best], mate, always happy with a PB,” a short-breathed Barrett said at the finish line. “I don’t know how much kicking I’ll be doing after this, though.”The new Super Rugby Aotearoa will see the five New Zealand Super Rugby teams go up against each other in 10 weeks of competition. Each team will play home and away fixtures against one another.Related: Super Rugby Aotearoa Schedule AnnouncedThe action begins with the Highlanders welcoming the Chiefs in Dunedin on 13 June. The Blues will face the Hurricanes a day later and could see Barrett make his first appearance for the franchise, against his old team. PRE-ORDER RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE’S 60TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE (JUL-20) HEREThe Bronco test is used as a measurement of aerobic endurance, and it sees players run shuttles of 20 metres, 40 metres and 60 metres five times over as quickly as possible.After having cleared a contactless temperature check from team doctor James McGarvey, the backs set to work. In the first Blues training session back, Barrett set a record in the Bronco test. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img Running the show: Callum Sheedy for Bristol Bears (Getty Images) Join the stand-off on a metaphorical tour via Cardiff, Chew Valley and Hawaii This article originally appeared in the September 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img CALLUM SHEEDY has had a barnstorming season, navigating Bristol Bears through their journey to the Gallagher Premiership play-offs and making the fly-half jersey his own. And now he’s been called up to the Wales squad! The Cardiff native tells us about his life…“AT 16 or 17 years old I was a pathetic goalkicker. I was terrible. I didn’t even kick for our school (Millfield) – Tom Whiteley, the Saracens scrum-half, used to kick for us. I just loved running the ball.“But then moving into a professional environment, you won’t survive as a ten if you can’t kick. So I spent so many hours with Mark Tainton, who was our kicking coach at the time.“Kicking is about what feels natural. I didn’t want to model my kick on Jonny Wilkinson or Johnny Sexton or Dan Carter. I played a lot of football growing up, so I kicked the ball like a football. I needed a few tweaks with my approach to the ball, my tempo into the ball. And it’s about not overthinking everything because I’m quite a deep thinker.“I wasn’t like Lionel Messi! I was a central midfielder in football and I enjoyed the defensive side. I liked getting stuck in but I was pretty basic. I’d make a ten-metre pass, max, just play the easy ball all the time. But I liked working hard and I liked going box to box.Can he kick it: Sheedy warms up (Getty Images)“I’m a big Leeds United fan. I love it. I’ve had a lot of stick from friends over the years as they’ve been in the Championship and then League One – I think the worse they became, the more I loved them. What (coach) Marcelo Bielsa has done is amazing. The closer we got to the Premier League, the more my nerves jangled (Leeds are back in the top flight for the first time since 2004).“On deep thinking, you have your goalkicking focus and your rugby focus. A big thing I’ve learnt is just because you’re having an off-day off the tee doesn’t mean you then become poor in open play and vice versa.“It’s hard because I could have the best day of my life, be Man of the Match and get ten out of ten kicks, get two tries, but still come off the pitch and think about two missed tackles. I’m very much a perfectionist and that’s not always a good thing.“Pat Lam has helped massively. He makes it all very clear. His post-match and pre-match analysis is so clear and precise that it’s music to my ears. You can ask him anything to clear your mind and he’ll give you the most honest answer. That’s what we want.“The new players coming in have been brilliant. If you came into our camp now, I don’t think you’d be able to tell who is new and who has been there for years. Take Mitch Eadie: I played with him four or five years ago and he was our best player every week, unbelievable. Having someone like him – a true Bristolian – has already offered massive value. “I’m sure you’ll see Semi Radradra. Think of the X-factor him and Charles Piutau can pull off. And Kyle Sinckler has come in and straightaway you can tell that he’s working at a world-class level.Breaking free: Against Bath (Getty Images)“It’s the little talks on the pitch – he’s a tighthead prop, but it’s the detail and knowledge that he has on the game. It reminds me of John Afoa. They could literally fit in at fly-half and run the game.“I was tapping John up in the gym about the Hawaiian pro team he co-owns. In the off-season I wouldn’t mind going out there for a few weeks! I said he’s like the Hawaiian Steve Lansdown now.“You can train all you want but getting minutes on the pitch is invaluable. Going to play for Jersey, Cinderford, Clifton or Dings was priceless for me. Dan Carter and Ardie Savea playing amateur rugby in New Zealand recently is extreme but it’s brilliant to go do it. I think there has to be a link between Premiership clubs and Championship or National One clubs.“I’ll actually be coaching Chew Valley when their season restarts. There are some really good players out there. Towards the end of lockdown I was doing my exercise at the club. My girlfriend lives in Chew Valley and her brother plays for the club.“I ended up speaking to the director of rugby there. There was an opportunity to help out with the backs. I felt like it might be the right time to go into coaching. I’ve done my Level Two badges and I love rugby. I’m a bit of a nause. I’m really excited.“I want to be the best player in the world. If you don’t want that you’re in the wrong spot. But there’s constant competition in Bristol. Of course I want to be an international, to go to World Cups, but my biggest focus is being the Bristol ten for the long-term future.”last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_imgBoth the Top 14 and Premiership clubs were critical of the proposed Test schedule as it means top players will be missing for domestic duty on certain weekends. For example, the English top flight is due to start its 2020-21 season on 20 November.However, the World Rugby Council approved the changing 2020’s Regulation Nine window, which governs the release of international players by the clubs, at a meeting on 30 July.2020 Autumn Internationals ScheduleHere’s a list of the confirmed fixtures, with kick-offs UK & Ireland time.Sun 11 Oct New Zealand 16-16 Australia (Bledisloe Cup)Sun 18 Oct New Zealand 27-7 Australia (Bledisloe Cup)Fri 23 Oct Scotland 48-7 Georgia (warm-up match)Sat 24 Oct Ireland 50-17 Italy (Six Nations)Sat 24 Oct Ireland 21-7 Italy Women (Women’s Six Nations)Sat 24 Oct France 38-21 Wales (warm-up match)Sun 25 Oct Scotland 13-13 France Women (Women’s Six Nations)Sat 31 Oct Australia 5-43 Zealand (Tri-Nations)Sat 31 Oct Wales 10-14 Scotland (Six Nations) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Rugby’s 2020 autumn Internationals schedule taking shape Since the Wales v Scotland Six Nations match was cancelled at the last minute in mid-March, Test rugby has had to take a backseat as the sport navigates its way through the Covid-19 pandemic.More pressing issues like struggling finances, training during lockdown and restarting domestic competitions came to the fore in rugby while global events like the 15-a-side summer tours and World Sevens Series were cancelled. Yet there are promising signs regarding the return of international rugby.Super Rugby competitions in New Zealand and Australia have been followed by the Gallagher Premiership and Guinness Pro14 restarting in August. Now the 2020 autumn Internationals schedule has taken shape too.Southern foes: NZ’s Jordie Barrett passes against Australia in last year’s Rugby Championship (Getty Images)The World Rugby Council has approved the governing body’s recommendation of a longer international window later this year, with the objective of “optimising recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic for the betterment of the global game at all levels”.Travel restrictions mean the original November Test schedule, with southern hemisphere sides travelling to Europe, cannot take place, but there are plans for top-level competitions on both sides of the equator.South Africa have withdrawn from the Rugby Championship, so Argentina, Australia and New Zealand will now play a Tri-Nations tournament. Each team will play each other twice between 31 October and 5 December, with matches being staged in Brisbane, Newcastle and Sydney.In the northern hemisphere, the Six Nations matches postponed due to coronavirus took place at the end of October while there were also one-off fixtures between Scotland and Georgia and Wales and France.Related: 2020 Six Nations fixturesLeading men: Ireland captain Johnny Sexton and Italy skipper Luca Bigi (Getty Images)The Women’s Six Nations was more complicated because there were six matches to reschedule, including three apiece for Scotland and Italy. The weekend of 24-25 October saw the Scotland v France and Ireland v Italy matches played, and the original final-round matches were all due to be played on 1 November.However, both Wales v Scotland and France v Ireland were postponed due to positive Covid tests, so Italy v England was the only match that took place. The three remaining fixtures – Italy v Scotland, Wales v Scotland and France v Ireland – have since been cancelled, while the European qualifiers for the 2021 World Cup that were due to take place in December have now been postponed until early next year.Related: 2021 Rugby World Cup Qualifying ProcessEngland Women will play a two-Test series against France in November, though. They will play in France on Saturday 14 November and at Twickenham a week later, in what will be a double-header with the men. Both matches will be shown live on BBC Two.New Zealand’s Black Ferns have a three-match schedule, with a Possibles v Probables fixture followed by back-to-back games against the NZ Barbarians on 14 and 21 November.As for the remainder of the men’s calendar, 7-8 November was designated as a rest weekend followed by new tournament, the Autumn Nations Cup, from 13 November to 6 December.The Autumn Nations Cup will feature the Six Nations sides as well as Fiji and Georgia, with the eight teams split into two groups.Related: How to watch the Autumn Nations CupEngland, Georgia, Ireland and Wales are in one pool with Fiji, France, Italy and Scotland in the other. After playing the other teams in their pool, a finals weekend will see the table-toppers in each group play each other as well as 2nd v 2nd and so on. Tri-Nations and Autumn Nations Cup tournaments planned for November and December Sat 31 Oct Italy 5-34 England (Six Nations)Sat 31 Oct France 35-27 Ireland (Six Nations)Sun 1 Nov Italy 0-54 England Women (Women’s Six Nations)Sat 7 Nov Australia 24-22 New Zealand (Tri-Nations)Sat 7 Nov Black Ferns Possibles 28-19 Probables (selection match)Fri 13 Nov Ireland 32-9 Wales (Autumn Nations Cup) Sat 14 Nov New Zealand 15-25 Argentina (Tri-Nations)Sat 14 Nov Italy 17-28 Scotland (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 14 Nov France 10-33 England Women (Autumn International)Sat 14 Nov England 40-0 Georgia (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 14 Nov Samoa 40-0 Tonga Women (RWC 2021 Qualifier)Sat 14 Nov Black Ferns 34-15 NZ Barbarians (invitational match)Sun 15 Nov France v Fiji (Autumn Nations Cup) CANCELLEDSat 21 Nov Argentina 15-15 Australia (Tri-Nations)Sat 21 Nov England 25-23 France Women (Autumn International)Sat 21 Nov Italy v Fiji (Autumn Nations Cup) CANCELLEDSat 21 Nov England 18-7 Ireland (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 21 Nov Wales 18-0 Georgia (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 21 Nov Black Ferns 19-17 NZ Barbarians (invitational match)Sun 22 Nov Scotland 15-22 France (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 28 Nov Argentina 0-38 New Zealand (Tri-Nations)Sat 28 Nov Scotland v Fiji (Autumn Nations Cup) CANCELLEDSat 28 Nov Wales 13-24 England (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 28 Nov France 36-5 Italy ( Autumn Nations Cup)Sun 29 Nov Ireland 23-10 Georgia (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 5 Dec Australia 16-16 Argentina (Tri-Nations)Sat 5 Dec Georgia 38-24 Fiji (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 5 Dec Ireland 31-16 Scotland (Autumn Nations Cup)Sat 5 Dec Wales 38-18 Italy (Autumn Nations Cup)Sun 6 Dec England v France (2pm, Twickenham, Autumn Nations Cup Final) Live on Amazon Prime Video First up: The Autumn Nations Cup will kick off with Ireland v Wales in Dublin (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Asia, Rector Collierville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Issa Kirarira says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments are closed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service September 6, 2012 at 5:21 am That is the beauty of Islam. Islam will never protect the reprobates; fabricator, hypocrites, even if they are among them. The culprits should face the law. Blasphemy is one of the worst crimes before God.Let us all live happily on the universe as advised by the Quran- the holy book of Islam and stressed by Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim scholar who has encouraged humanity to be nice to each other in our diversity life style.Issa Kirarira Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Comments (2) Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Pakistan churches hail arrest of Muslim cleric for framing Christian girl By Anto AkkaraPosted Sep 4, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York September 8, 2012 at 4:16 pm We like to see more awareness among good Muslims, law abiding citizen of Pakistan on the issue that without proven guilt no one should be punished. A mob cannot get free license to kill a person or destroy a Church or a Mosque. Good Muslims should condemn publicly for any terrorist activities that endanger innocent life in the name of religion. Thanks to Pakistani mass media in bringing justice in this juvenile blasphemy case. Keep up good works in the name of Allah, who is almighty and merciful. Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC [Ecumenical News International] Church officials and Christian activists in Pakistan said they were encouraged by the arrest of a Muslim cleric on charges of framing an illiterate Christian teenager on blasphemy charges.“This is a very positive development,” Victor Azariah, general secretary of the National Council of Churches in Pakistan (NCCP), told ENInews Sept. 4 from his office in Lahore.“There is a strong demand even in the media now to end the abuse of the blasphemy law. We hope this will lead to a positive outcome,” said Azariah, reacting to the Sept. 2 arrest of Muslim cleric Khalid Chishti on the charge of framing Christian girl Rimsha Masih.The arrest of the illiterate and mentally challenged girl 10 days earlier had evoked widespread condemnation in the Pakistani media. There were calls for an end to abuses of the law, which criminalizes criticism of Islam or abuse of the Quran, the Muslim holy book.According to police reports, eyewitnesses said the arrested cleric had torn and planted pages of Quran in the girl’s bag, which held burned trash papers.A mob had gathered to torch the girl’s house. In addition, more than 300 Christians in the Islamabad suburb had fled to escape mob violence following repeated announcement of the “blasphemy” on loudspeakers of the local mosque.Reports said the accusation was made to chase Christians out of the area.“This is a big development in the fight against the abuse of blasphemy law,” Joseph Francis, founding director of CLAAS (Centre for Legal Aid Assistance-Settlement) told ENInews.“For the first time, we have a crystal clear case of how the blasphemy law is misused,” said Francis, whose organization has extended legal support to 102 people, most of them Muslims, charged with blasphemy.“An overwhelming majority of the blasphemy allegations are aimed at settling personal enmity, business jealousy and grabbing property,” Francis said. Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Julian Malakar says: last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Posted Dec 25, 2012 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York January 2, 2013 at 10:21 am Great words from a great Archbishop! Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Archbishop of Canterbury’s Christmas Day sermon Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Fifty-nine per cent of British people describe themselves as Christians, so the census informed us a couple of weeks ago; twelve per cent down from ten years ago.  There was, of course, great delight from a couple of secularist organisations.  But if I were a member of the British Humanist Association, I might want to pause before I became too excited.  It remains true that three quarters of the public still want to identify themselves as having a religious faith of some kind.  And what the census doesn’t and probably can’t measure is exactly how those who don’t identify as religious think about religion.  Do they never give it a thought?  Do they wish they could believe something?  Do they see it as a problem or as a resource in society?  In the deeply painful aftermath of the Synod’s vote last month, what was startling was how many people who certainly wouldn’t have said yes to the census question turned out to have a sort of investment in the Church, a desire to see the Church looking credible and a real sense of loss when—as they saw it—the Church failed to sort its business out.There are a lot more questions to ask before we could possibly assume that the census figures told us that faith was losing its hold on society.  But—and here is the challenging thing—what if those figures had been worse?  What if they get worse in the next few years?  Should we conclude that faith in general and Christian faith in particular had had its day and that we should give up on it?  The answer has to be a resounding, ‘No: we might feel that we had made a poor job of communicating it, we might regret the enormous loss to public life and public service involved in the weakening of faith.  But we simply could not conclude that faith had suddenly become impossible or incredible.’Faith is not about what public opinion decides, and it is not about how we happen to be feeling about ourselves.  It is the response people make to what presents itself as a reality – a reality which makes claims on you.  Here is something so extraordinary that it interrupts our world; here is something that (like Moses in the story of the Burning Bush) makes you ‘turn aside to see’, that stops you short.  Faith begins in the moment of stopping, you could say:  the moment when you can’t just walk on as you did before.  But even more challengingly, it is something whose claims involve change and even loss.  If this is really what it seems to be, ideas, habits, hopes all change, and it is a change that is going to be painful.  In the most haunting Christmas poem in the English language [The Journey of the Magi], T. S. Eliot imagined the wise men back at home after their journey to Bethlehem, ‘no longer at ease here in the old dispensation’, and wondering whether what they had witnessed was birth or death.…  I had seen birth and death,But had thought they were different;  this Birth wasHard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our deathYet the wise men can’t deny that they’ve seen what they’ve seen:  they really made the journey and they really saw something that persuaded them it had been worthwhile.  Faith:  a claim, a shock, a death, a life.‘It was, you may say, satisfactory’, says Eliot’s wise man, in a masterpiece of Eliot understatement.  The wise men found what they were looking for – and it was not at all what they thought they had been looking for.  The Christian gospel firmly declares two equally necessary truths.  Jesus is the hope of the nations, Jesus is what the entire human race really longs to see, the person whose presence heals all wounds and griefs.  And Jesus is an utter surprise, so foreign that he is unrecognisable to those who might have been expected to welcome him.  He made the world, says St John, and he spoke in its history; but the world had no room for him and the experts in revelation and religious purity turned from him in disgust (John 1.10—11).You should never open the New Testament without remembering that the religious experts and the Temple hierarchy are the ones who see Jesus as their enemy.  They don’t want to be interrupted, to stop and see.The truth of God is the most comforting and joyful presence we can imagine; and also the most disorienting and demanding.  There’s a famous Old Testament story (2 Kings 5) about the great military leader of ancient Israel’s fiercest enemy, who comes to the prophet Elisha to be healed of his leprosy; and the prophet tells him simply to wash in the river.  He is indignant:  surely there must be something more difficult and glamorous and heroic to do?  No;  it’s perfectly simple.  Go and wash, go and join all those ordinary humble folk who are sluicing themselves in the river after a long day’s work, or beating their laundry against the stones.  Go and join the rest of the human race and acknowledge who you are.  That’s the truest heroism and the hardest.It’s a foreshadowing of the New Testament invitation: repent and believe and be baptised.  Turn round and look where you’ve never looked before, trust the one who is calling you and drop under the water of his overflowing compassion.  Be with him.  Join the new human race, re-created in the Spirit of mutual love and delight and service.If Jesus is strange and threatening, isn’t that (the New Testament certainly suggests) a sign of how far we’ve wandered from real humanity, real honesty about our weaknesses and limits?  ‘I am the great sun, but you do not see me’ – the beginning of another wonderful poem, by Charles Causley.  We are so fascinated by our own business, whether we call it religious or not, that we find it ‘hard and bitter agony’ to turn away and be still and look at the mystery of love.  If we think about religion, perhaps we think of it as a set of neat answers to our questions, or as a system of behaviour, ritual and moral, or as an optional extra to ‘ordinary’ life for those who find certain sorts of problem interesting.  But Jesus does not come just to answer the questions we think important. (One of the great features of all the gospels, specially St John’s, is how often Jesus refuses to answer the question put to him and asks a question in reply.)  He does not come to give us a set of techniques for keeping God happy; and he certainly doesn’t come to create a harmlessly eccentric hobby for speculative minds.  He comes to make humanity itself new, to create fresh possibilities for being at peace with God and each other; and he does this by summoning us to be with him.It shouldn’t surprise us of all this doesn’t instantly win the popular vote in a census.  If people hesitate to call themselves Christian, perhaps this is a sort of backhanded recognition that there is a strangeness and a toughness to what Christian faith claims that should not be taken lightly.  And yet, if many people still do, in spite of everything, want to call themselves by the name Christian, that also means there is a recognition that somehow this is where we should be, where it’s natural to be – in the company of this man, Jesus Christ, listening to his words, turning aside to see deeply into the mysterious events of his life and death and resurrection.  But the one thing we can be sure of is that the truth or falsehood of faith doesn’t rest on the success of the faith in winning numbers; sometimes this seems to work and sometimes it doesn’t.  We can and should try as hard and imaginatively as we can to share the faith, but we must not lose heart if it doesn’t immediately take root as we might want.  We are after all, doing something rather outrageous, asking men and women to stop and look and turn around, and learn how to keep company with a figure whose outlines we often see only dimly.Yet when a life is lived that shows what that company really means, the outline becomes less dim, and people will begin to recognise why lives like that seem, despite everything, to be ‘normal’ – the natural response to the way things are.  When people respond to outrageous cruelty and violence, with a hard-won readiness to understand and be reconciled, few if any can bring themselves to say that all this is an illusion.  The parents who have lost a child to gang violence;  the wife who has seen her husband killed in front of her by an anti-Christian mob in India;  the woman who has struggled for years to comprehend and accept the rape and murder of her sister;  the Israeli and Palestinian friends who have been brought together by the fact that they have lost family members in the conflict and injustice that still racks the Holy Land – all these are specific people I have had the privilege of meeting as archbishop over these ten years; and in their willingness to explore the new humanity of forgiveness and rebuilding relations, without for a moment making light of their own or other people’s nightmare suffering, or trying to explain it away, these are the ones who make us see, who oblige us to turn aside and look, as if at a bush burning but not consumed.  And to look at Jesus, who asks of us initially just to stop and reflect, to stay for a moment in the light that allows us to see ourselves honestly and to see the world differently.That’s the heart of it, seeing ourselves honestly, seeing the world differently.  That’s where faith begins, beyond the answers of a system, or the disciplines of a ritual, or the requirements of a moral code.  These have their place;  and those who spend time in the company of Jesus will find themselves working out all these things in the light of the scriptural witness to the new life.  But it all starts with that turning aside to see.  And for some, for many perhaps, it is too much to take in, and many will want to turn away.  St John describes just this in a later chapter of his gospel (at the end of chapter 6) where Jesus’ hearers say that his words are just too much for them, too offensive, too exacting, too weird.  Yet if – if we can let go of our conviction that our questions, our priorities and worries, achievements and failures aren’t after all the most important thing in the universe;  if we find the freedom to stop and turn aside, then the world itself begins to turn into renewal.  ‘O come, let us adore him’, says the carol.  That adoration, that wondering gaze at the child in the manger, is where faith is born; and where faith is born, so is the new world of Jesus and his Spirit.©  Rowan Williams 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Lambeth Palace] The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, is urging people to go and ‘join the human race’ this Christmas and become agents of transformation and renewal.In his final Christmas sermon in Canterbury Cathedral Dr Williams says the purpose of the Christian message isn’t to defend religion or make the church credible, but to pose a challenge to everyone to reconsider who they are:“Here is something so extraordinary that it interrupts our world; here is something that – like Moses in the story of the Burning Bush – makes you ‘turn aside to see’, that stops you short. Faith begins in the moment of stopping … the moment when you can’t just walk on as you did before …”Dr Williams acknowledged the damage to credibility that the church experienced in the vote over women bishops, but rejected the notion that census statistics showing an apparent religious decline were entirely good news for campaigning atheists. 59% of people still identified themselves as Christian, he observed, and faith has to mean more than ‘what public opinion decides’. Christians should not, he says, lose heart:“We are after all, doing something rather outrageous, asking men and women to stop and look and turn around, and learn how to keep company with a figure whose outlines we often see only dimly.”The challenge of the Gospel message, he says, is not about religious defensiveness but about the possibilities of transformation:“Jesus does not come just to answer the questions we think important … he does not come to give us a set of techniques for keeping God happy; and he certainly doesn’t come to create a harmlessly eccentric hobby for speculative minds. He comes to make humanity itself new, to create fresh possibilities for being at peace with God.”And people responding to this invitation and bringing about incredible transformation and had proved inspirational to him in his time as Archbishop:“When people respond to outrageous cruelty and violence with a hard-won readiness to understand and be reconciled, few if any can bring themselves to say that all this is an illusion.“The parents who have lost a child to gang violence, the wife who has seen her husband killed in front of her by an anti-Christian mob in India, the woman who has struggled for years to comprehend and accept the rape and murder of her sister, the Israeli and Palestinian friends who have been brought together by the fact that they have lost family members in the conflict and injustice that still racks the Holy Land – all these are specific people I have had the privilege of meeting as Archbishop over these ten years; and in their willingness to explore the new humanity of forgiveness and rebuilding relations, without for a moment making light of their own or other people’s nightmare suffering, or trying to explain it away, these are the ones who make us see, who oblige us to turn aside and look, as if at a bush burning but not consumed.”The challenge is for everyone, he says;“Go and join the rest of the human race and acknowledge who you are. That’s the truest heroism and the hardest. It’s a foreshadowing of the New Testament invitation: repent and believe and be baptised. Turn round and look where you’ve never looked before, trust the one who is calling you and drop under the water of his overflowing compassion. Be with him. Join the new human race, re-created in the Spirit of mutual love and delight and service.”A complete transcript of the Archbishop’s sermon follows: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments (1) Archbishop of Canterbury Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Sam Cuthbert says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_imgRIP: Col. Fitzroy Newsum (USAF, ret.) Tuskegee Airman was renowned for passion for flying, community involvement Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Barbara Hueser Helmick says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments (5) Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA July 26, 2013 at 10:23 am What a great person to be around I will always remember the time I spent with Col. Newsum @ the Museum of Flight in Seattle. He and I became close in such a shot time God Bless Him and all of his family. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY January 14, 2013 at 9:46 am Had the pleasure of taking photos of Col. Newsum and all the local Tuskegee Airmen many times here at the U.S. Air Force Academy.. He was always my favorite. RIP Sir. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Billy Hebert says: Obituary, January 18, 2013 at 2:08 pm I had the good fortune to work in the same department with Buck at Martin Marietta in the early 70’s. What a fantastic man; he always had a great smile for everyone even the secretary (me). Every time I saw or heard anything about the Tuskegee Airmen I thought of him. We have lost a great man as so many people acknowledge. God bless his wonderful family at this difficult time. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Posted Jan 11, 2013 Patricia Cote says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Denver] Colonel Fitzroy Newsum died January 5, 2013. Newsum was a member of the cadre of African American pilots now famously known as the Tuskegee Airmen. In 1989, Col. Newsum received the Brigadier General Noel F. Parish Award for outstanding achievement on behalf of the Tuskegee Airmen Inc., and along with other surviving Tuskegee Airmen, Newsum was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal by President George W. Bush in Washington D.C. in 2007.Newsum served with distinction in WWII and Korea, as a pilot and squadron operations officer. After a full career in the Air Force, he devoted his talents and witness to the Denver community and to St. Thomas Episcopal Church.Newsum, born in New York City in 1918, earned an undergraduate degree from the College of Military Science at the University of Maryland, and a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Oklahoma. He is survived by his wife of more than 63 years, Joan Carney Newsum; four children: Brian, Dani, Eric, and Gail; and four grandchildren: Nicholas and McKenna Newsum-Schoenberg, and Taylor and Savannah Newsum. Rector Knoxville, TN People Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Baba diop says: Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 13, 2013 at 8:59 am Rest in peace , the whole sky is feeling lonely because you have gone……….. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Mike Kaplan says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York January 17, 2013 at 10:09 am Thank-you so much for your service. Give Jesus a big hug for me. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 12, 2013 at 12:13 pm Yes, quaint indeed. However it has significance for those of us who are part of the Anglican Communion but not part of the Church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is ex officio Primate of the entire Communion as well as Primate of England; he is not elected democratically by the clergy and laypeople of his diocese and the church that he leads in his own country is a state church. In the Episcopal Church every lay or clerical official is democratically elected by the elected representatives of the clergy and laypeople of the church and the Constitution prohibits the establishment of a state church.One can–and perhaps should–appreciate the underlying meaning of the ceremonies associated with our heritage through the Church of England of being a continuing Catholic church the foundation of which is not in the 17th century but goes goes back through Canterbury and Rome to the original church of the apostles.Our inheritance of a reformed Catholic faith should not prevent our embracing those progressive changes that allow us to proclaim the Good News of God in Jesus Christ to an ever-changing world. May God bless the ministry of our new ‘first among equals’ Archbishop Welby. Submit a Press Release Comments (5) Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Dan Webster says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Justin Welby becomes archbishop of Canterbury-elect Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, Posted Jan 11, 2013 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC January 11, 2013 at 11:30 pm Let us all remember Archbishop Welby in our daily prayers.And thanks be to God for all the work of Archbishop Williams. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Thomas Henry Jr says: Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA George Kooney says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Marylin Day says: Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service February 3, 2013 at 3:34 pm Elect simply means chosen. It doesn’t always deal with being voted in. So He is rightfully, Archbishop-elect, because he was chosen to be the next archbishop. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Rev. Prof. H. R. Bronk says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA January 11, 2013 at 4:18 pm How quaint! Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC January 11, 2013 at 4:09 pm Isn’t it more accurate to rever to him as the “archbishop-designate” since he really is appointed? Elect seems to suggest, at least in the USA, there was some open process by which he was elected to his new office. [Lambeth Palace] A medieval ceremony has begun the process of the Rt. Rev. Justin Welby becoming the archbishop of Canterbury.The College of Canons of Canterbury Cathedral has unanimously elected Bishop Justin Welby as the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury.The 35-strong College of Canons, made up of senior clergy and lay people from the Diocese of Canterbury, met at Canterbury Cathedral’s 14th-century Chapter House to take part in the formality, which dates back more than 1000 years.The process of electing the next Archbishop of Canterbury by the cathedral community is enshrined within its constitution and can only take place once a Congé d’Élire and Letter Missive from the Crown has been received.The ceremony was chaired by the Dean of Canterbury, Robert Willis. As is traditional, the candidate was not invited to attend the ceremony, and only one name featured on the ballot sheet for the College of Canons to select.The Dean of Canterbury Cathedral Reverend Dr Robert Willis said: “The decision we made this morning is taken formally to London.“In St Paul’s Cathedral on February 4, I shall present this to the Queen’s commission.“They will say that is valid, legal and right and at that moment Justin Welby becomes in all powers the Archbishop of Canterbury.” Rector Albany, NY Archbishop of Canterbury Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC last_img read more


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