Month: January 2021

Month: January 2021

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the first in a two-part series featuring two candidates vying to represent Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District. Across the country, Republicans are challenging Democratic incumbents to gain control of the U.S. House of Representatives. The race for Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District is no different. Republican candidate Jackie Walorski is running against Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly, who has held his position for the last four years. It has been highlighted in the media as one of the nation’s most contested races. Walorski told The Observer she would look to the University as a potential partner to her if she were elected. She specifically commended the University’s focus on research and said it would be an asset to the district she would serve. “The research dollars, the things that have happened in this place, not only produce a great community for us, but a great alum community around the world,” she said. Walorski previously worked as a local reporter, and she said this exposed her to various research initiatives that are now coming to life at the University. “Things that they were looking for are now a reality. So this is the paramount issue for me,” she said. Walorski said in terms of her economic platform, the country must control spending, which will especially impact recent college graduates in search for employment. She said her time serving the Indiana state legislature has prepared her to do it on a more broad level. “What we have done in these past six years is melted down our size of government, all aimed at protecting the taxpayer,” Walorski said. “That has to be done as a foundational measure at the federal government in order for [students] to have a job when they get out of here.” Walorski said she would propose the 2011 budget be frozen in order for the president to audit agencies and cut back on duplicative efforts. She said trimming bureaucracy would help the job market. “If we create a level of certainty at the federal level where they know there is not going to be mandates coming down, that the next shoe is going to drop, we will see a flexibility of the market where people are hiring,” Walorski said. In terms of recent health care reform, Walorski said one of the most popular aspects crossing party lines particularly applies to college students. “I think the issue of being able to carry kids until they are 26 is probably the most popular part of the whole program,” she said. “I have heard from Republicans and Democrats and Independents alike that because the job market is so tight they like the security of being able to carry college graduates until they are 26.” Walorski did say that despite that particular aspect of the health care bill, more steps are needed to control medical litigation and damages, otherwise known as tort reform. Walorski also said education represents an extremely important part of her political platform. She said one thing that needs to be changed is how much responsibility teachers are being charged with. “We are shoving an unbelievable burden on teachers because of the breakdown of the family [and] because of our culture changing,” Walorski said. “Teachers are responsible for, in many cases, the kids more than the parents are and they are responsible for an unbelievable amount of teaching, not just curriculum.” Walorski also said the No Child Left Behind Act has created problems in the educational system by complicating funding for schools, which is controlled by each state. She said rectifying this issue is extremely important. “The money needs to be driven into the classrooms, not the administrators,” Walorski said. Walorski also said she has taken a strong stance on the issue of abortion, which is of particular importance to the Notre Dame community, noting in the past she has worked to de-fund pro-choice institutions. “The battle that is raging, the reason that people are so angry, is because we are talking about a tax supported industry. I’ve stood up to Planned Parenthood to de-fund them,” she said. “I don’t believe we should force anyone who does not believe in it to pay for it.” On the issue of the United States’ military presence in the Middle East, Walorski said the safety of the troops and the decision making of military personnel should guide government decisions in respect to the area. “I think that one of the biggest mistakes that happens in this country is that we as adult voters have allowed this government to evolve into this thing where bureaucrats make military calls,” she said. “Military calls need to come from the generals on the ground that we trust the president to put there.” Walorski said she felt military presence in the area impacts the everyday safety of American citizens, and therefore is an issue that must be addressed in an appropriate manner. “The number one job of the president of the United States is to protect the United States of America from foreign invasion and threat of domestic assault inside,” she said. “I don’t see how you skirt that when you have generals on the ground saying we are still not able to walk away from Afghanistan.” Overall, Walorski said the progress of her campaign so far makes her confident for the results Nov. 2. She said the unique nature of her campaign has allowed her to communicate her platforms successfully. “I’m as blue collar as they come. I’m self funding, it’s a real grass-roots race,” she said. “We have done a good job of getting our message out.” Despite any political differences Walorski and Donnelly may hold, they do share a common devotion to the Fighting Irish football team. “I’m a Notre Dame fan, and very, very grateful that Kelly is here as a coach,” she said. The second part of this series will feature Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly. It will run it tomorrow’s Observer.last_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgSaint Mary’s religious studies professor Jessica Wrobleski spoke Wednesday night about the way contemporary views of sex can be understood in the context of Catholic teaching. The lecture, “The Meaning of Sex,” was one of a series of lectures called “Theology on Fire.” It was the first of several sponsored by Saint Mary’s Campus Ministry and the Center for Spirituality. The ideas for the lectures are developed from controversial issues concerning college students and the Catholic Church, senior Emma Hoffman, who organized the event, said. “We want to explore topics that come up in our peers’ conversation, or more importantly, what doesn’t,” Hoffman said. Wrobleski focused on students’ personal understanding of sex and sexuality in modern society. She said personal awareness of sex is necessary in contemporary culture. “Sex is an inevitable, unavoidable aspect of life. Whether you encounter it in a magazine, a television show or a relationship, it is something as young, single people, we can’t help but think about,” Wrobleski said. She spoke about the various definitions of sex and how students can discern significance from different settings, such as premarital sex, casual sex and sex between two people of the same gender, while observing Catholic understanding. “I want students to understand that sexuality is not primarily a list of arbitrary rules, but rather something that allows us to deeply connect with God as humans,” Wrobleski said. Junior Emily Kieffer said the lecture connected the different ways students view sex. “It went beyond what the Church tells you or what you read in Cosmo. I thought the lecture really brought sex in to a perspective that is valuable for me as a college student and as a human,” Kieffer said. Junior Teresa Cristarella agreed. “It was nice to discuss sexuality and in the Church in a non-condemning way, rather than the consequential way that it is normally viewed,” Cristarella said. Wrobleski encouraged students who have questions about their sexuality or sex’s role in their life to talk to peers, married couples and religious figures. “Sex, at its base, is a relationship, and it is best understood by discussing it with others that are in your shoes or have experience with your situation,” Wrobleski said. Wrobleski will also be offering a Religious Studies course this spring called “Theologies of Love.” The curriculum focuses on relationships and broader questions of love.last_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgStudents interested in film and television must be willing to do whatever it takes to get into the industry, award-winning producers Kevin Fortson and Antonia Ellis said in a lecture Wednesday evening. “Having hired interns, it’s very clear who is a star and who isn’t … it shows who’s willing to do the work,” Ellis said. “If you have to make coffee or copies, do it.” Fortson said it is important for students to make themselves visible and reliable as a good worker and a part of a team. As senior vice president of production for Warner Horizon Television (WHTV), Fortson oversees the production of many scripted shows for cable and reality TV, including “Pretty Little Liars” and “The Bachelor.” When contemplating a career in Hollywood, one could either do freelance work or take a steadier job at a studio, like Fortson. Although freelancers have the chance to make huge profits, this type of work is risky, he said. As for knowing when producers have a hit, both Fortson and Ellis said sometimes it takes shooting the pilot or even airing the series before a television show really takes off. Fortson said he was skeptical of “The Bachelor” after hearing the original pitch. Ellis, who has produced numerous shows including “Royal Pains,” “Sex in the City” and “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman,” got her start in the music industry working on music videos during the advent of MTV. She said finding the perfect job is a confusing process. “I had wished someone had given me clues about how to get from point A to B,” Ellis said. Her career has taken her from Los Angeles to New York City and back again, and as a result of these demands, Ellis said she has not started a family. “You have to do some soul searching to figure out what makes you happy,” she said. Ellis also said she was optimistic about the status of women in Hollywood — both in production and in front of the camera. “I’ve never felt from a work standpoint that it was harder,” she said. “In films and TV there are a lot of strong women today and I’m excited about that.” Although neither Fortson nor Ellis attended Notre Dame, they both emphasized the value of a Notre Dame education. Fortson said having a degree from Notre Dame prepares students for whatever they want to do.last_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgWhen high school junior Anne Marie Wright witnessed the Haiti women’s national soccer team practicing on a South Bend soccer complex without fully functional equipment, she could not rectify the team’s lack of supplies with their status as potential World Cup contenders.Photo courtesy of Anne Marie Wright “Last summer for July through August, I pretty much practiced with them every day and I saw a lot of things that really made me want to help out,” Wright said. “Basically every day at practice there were always issues with cleats or shin guards or somebody not having equipment … Nobody had an extra pair of cleats, which I think is absolutely despicable for a team that’s supposed to be training for the World Cup.”“You would have to wait and practice without cleats or just sit on the sidelines,” she said. “So people would have to go over to the side of the building to get water to drink out of the spigot of a hose. Nobody brought water bottles; nobody had bags.“… They wore the same clothes every day to come to practice. It was community clothing; they all shared it. They didn’t have their own stuff. So basically that really prompted me to think, ‘I have to do something about this, this team is training for the World Cup.’”This summer, Wright, 17, a South Bend native and student at Culver Academies in Culver, Ind., heard about the Notre Dame athletic apparel clearance sale at the Compton Family Ice Arena held June 12 and realized her opportunity to take action.“When I heard that Notre Dame was switching to Under Armour, I thought, ‘That’s a great opportunity, they have to get rid of all this adidas stuff, what are they going to do with it?’” she said. “… So I called and I tried to contact a lot of people at Notre Dame to get the donated equipment and it didn’t work out very well. But there was a big sale that happened this summer, so we went there and got a ton of gear.“We got cleats for every girl on the team, we got t-shirts, spandex, sports bras … We got stuff for every single girl on the team.”Although Wright’s parents purchased the equipment and apparel this summer, Wright said she took ultimate responsibility for funding the donation.  For her 17th birthday, she asked friends and family to forgo typical gifts in favor of cash that she could put towards the team.“I gave up all my birthday gifts and got my parents and aunts and uncles and my friends to, instead of giving me birthday gifts, to give me money to support the cause,” she said. “… We’ve only raised I think $500, so my parents still paid a lot of money for it. So I’m still raising money.”Wright first joined forces with the Haitian national team in the summer of 2013, when she was practicing with her sister’s team on the Indiana Invaders FC field in South Bend. The Hatian team had been holding practice on the field since early 2013, after the team’s new Goshen-based coach, Shek Borkowski, relocated the team to the United States, she said.“The reason that they’re practicing in South Bend is the earthquake in Haiti in 2010,” Wright said. “Their soccer headquarters collapsed and their coach was there and he passed away.”Borkowski initially saw Wright practicing with her 13-year-old sister Mary Kate Wright and approached her to ask if she could play on one of his showcase teams. Anne Marie Wright was already past the age limit, but in the summer months after she first met Borkowski, she began to practice more frequently with the Haitian team and formed close bonds with the professional athletes despite language barriers and age differences, she said.“Especially last year when I practiced with them every day, I got to know a couple of them really closely, but they all speak Creole, so there’s kind of a language barrier you have to conquer, but through soccer anything is helpful,” Wright said. “It was great to see, hey, we have something in common, we’re playing together.”Team manager Sharon Mast said Wright found her niche in the team dynamic.“I was very impressed with how she held herself together and really participated with our girls,” Mast said. “She’s wonderful. I love her to pieces … She’s not a very outspoken person on the field but she’s seemed to develop and come along in that way.”Wright said her family completely supported her determination “to get [the team] in gear to train with so they could have the best possible chance of qualifying for the World Cup.” She said both her brother and sister have spent time practicing with the women as well.“My family helped me out a ton; my sister did a ton of organizing for all this stuff,” she said. “I was actually out of town when the sale happened, so I relied on my dad and my sister to get everything for me. I told them what we needed, and it was really great. … It’s kind of become a family affair.”Wright tried to coordinate with administrators at Notre Dame to encourage the donation of old equipment to the team, but she said she typically faced rejection. She said the end result proved each disappointment was worth her and her family’s effort.“The smiles on their faces were so worth all the work, all the emails, all the no’s that I got,” Wright said. “Everything where I couldn’t get something accomplished and I had to email people and go outside my comfort zone. It was definitely worth it to see them all at practice the one day I gave them all the gear and they saw and they thought, ‘oh my gosh, we get all this.’ They were all so thankful for it.”To donate to Wright’s fund to support the Haitian women’s national soccer team, visit http://www.gofundme.com/bln73s. Tags: Haitian Women’s Soccer Teamlast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgFor its annual High School Art Day, which provides students with the opportunity to take studio art classes on campus, the Snite Museum of Art hosted visitors from Penn High School in Mishawaka, Indiana.“This is our 28th year, and we rotate which high school we invite, and it’s all over the Michiana area,” program coordinator Mary Rattenbury said. “We can take between 50 and 60 kids to come spend the day on campus.”Penn students began their day by touring the Snite Museum’s senior thesis exhibits of students pursuing a Bachelors in Fine Arts (BFA) or a Masters of Fine Arts (MFA).  Students were free to roam and read about each exhibit, but there were also graduate students on site to give greater detail into their art projects, according to Rattenbury.One graduate student presenting her MFA thesis was Laura Lemna, who has a concentration in painting. Lemna’s mural exhibited bright, abstract patterns. She said the visiting students should make small, incremental decisions in developing themselves as artists.“Not everyone understands that being an artist is a career that someone is able to pursue,” Lemna said. “So, I think the earlier that you can expose that career option, and for [these students] to see real life examples of people doing that and enjoying it, I think that’s very important.”After seeing the BFA and MFA exhibits, Penn students were split into groups and taken to their morning studio art workshops in the Riley Hall of Art and Design. High schoolers had the opportunity to take courses such as “Paper Marbling and Bookbinding,” “Clay Slabs and Beyond,” “Playing With Light” and “Decorative Cast Relief Sculpture.”From there, students proceeded to West Lake Hall for lunch.“During lunch, two of the graduate students, [Mitch Springer and Thomas Cornell, presented] how to create a portfolio, so the students can start to know how to put things together for their future, whether it be a job or education,” Rattenbury said.In the afternoon, students remained at West Lake Hall for more studio sessions. The classes there included “Concert Poster Design,” “Design your own Hand-Lettered Postcard,” “Seeing Color” and “Digital Sketchbook Pro.”“It’s a full day,” Rattenbury said. “We really enjoy doing it. The students are exposed to life on campus, and the graduate students gain experience in teaching. It’s a nice way for them to gain experience for their future, too.”Tags: high school art day, penn high school, Snite Museum of Artlast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgEditor’s note: This article is one in a series profiling the dorms. Previous articles have covered dorms built before Dillon Hall.Approximately 87 years ago, Dillon Hall opened to residents, funded by Knute Rockne and a 1925 Rose Bowl victory for Notre Dame.The hall is named after Fr. Patrick Dillon, the second president of the University of Notre Dame. The chapel is dedicated to St. Patrick but contains a side altar dedicated to St. Olaf, the patron saint of Norway, to honor Rockne, who was born in Norway. Though Rockne’s success with the football team was the source of funding for Dillon Hall, he never got to see it completed. The side altar was added after the chapel was completed to honor Rockne and his dedication to the university.“I love the location, I love the culture and I love the amount of guys in regards to [interhall] athletics,” Hayden Parkhill, a sophomore currently living in Dillon, said.After Notre Dame’s athletic success in the 1920s under Knute Rockne, the University built Dillon and Alumni Halls to house the growing student population. Along with Alumni, Dillon first housed students in the fall of 1931. Students, however, were asked to spend the first few weeks of the semester in South Bend houses while waiting for the residence halls to be completely finished, Fr. Paul Doyle, the rector of Dillon, said a member of the first class of Dillon residents told him.Next year, the residents of Dillon Hall will move into the currently unnamed building on McGlinn fields behind West Quad so Dillon itself can undergo renovations. Though the students would traditionally move into Pangborn during the reconstruction, Dillon Hall contains so many residents that it would be impossible to fit all of them into Pangborn, Doyle said.Doyle said he hopes the renovations preserve the windows above the doors in Dillon, known as transoms.“We’re the only dorm left with transoms that work. I hope they survive the rehabilitation,” Doyle said in regards to the renovations.Dillon Hall is well-known across campus for its Thursday night “Milkshake Mass.” In 1997, Doyle started the milkshake mass to encourage questions about faith and fellowship among students. As another positive, Doyle said, the free milkshakes offered around 10:45 p.m. every Thursday give students a reason to avoid going off campus to socialize.“The chapel holds 170 people, [but we always have] people sitting on the floor,” Doyle said.When asked what they enjoyed most about living in Dillon, both Parkhill and Doyle said the community that comes along with being such a big residence hall was extremely important to them.“You get put in a dorm by the computer, yet each dorm has its own personality based on the students who are here. The creativity of the student leadership is a really big deal,” Doyle said. “It’s so edifying to be around such good young people, and all my classmates who come back say that. … Surely, the best part about [being rector] is the students.”Tags: Dillon Hall, dorm community, dorm features, Milkshake Masslast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Les McCarthy Members of the Notre Dame community participate in an ALS awareness walk on campus. The walk is sponsored by the Neuroscience Club and the Notre Dame Club of the Mid-Hudson Valley.Sophomore Michelle Lee, Neuroscience Club member, is commissioner for the ALS walk this year.Registration for the event starts at 8:45 a.m. inside the Jordan Hall of Science. After registration, coffee, bagels and muffins will be available prior to a short speech by Kronenberger and co-president of the Mid-Hudson Valley Club Les McCarthy. The group will head out for the walk a little before 9:45 a.m. McCarthy and Kronenberger said registration for the event is $10 and can be completed online prior to the walk or at the event. Event t-shirts were donated by local company CN PATEL and family, and the College of Science is providing refreshments, so the whole $10 will go towards ALS patient support in St. Joseph County. The purpose of the walk is to raise money for local PALS (patients with ALS) and caregivers, McCarthy said. Starting at Jordan, the walk will go “through South Quad, around the lakes and then stop at the grotto for a prayer service where we will read a list of alumni and Notre Dame community members who have had ALS,” Kronenberger said. Holy Cross priest Fr. Robert “Bob” Dowd will lead the prayer service.“We will pray specifically for them, their families and in general for ALS patients and their caregivers,” Kronenberger said.McCarthy and Linda Legault Quinn, class of 1984, co-presidents of the Mid-Hudson Valley Club, have acted as advisors to the Neuroscience Club for the 2018 walk as well as previous ALS walks on campus in 2015 and 2016. The Notre Dame Club of the Mid-Hudson Valley has held a walk, located on the picturesque walkway over the Hudson each year every third Sunday of October since 2009. The walk on Notre Dame’s campus complements the annual walk across the Hudson River. The first walk across the Hudson drew 55 participants. Almost 10 years later, the recent walk on Oct. 21 drew 2,000 participants and a large sum of donations that went towards the ALS Association Greater New York Chapter, McCarthy said. McCarthy was inspired to start the walk after losing three friends to the disease. “When my first friend died twenty-five years ago, I knew nothing about ALS, as many people still don’t know today,” McCarthy said. “I was moved because I saw the effects, but I really didn’t do anything about [it]. I didn’t have the time then that I do today. “Then my former classmate at Cornell died in 2006 of ALS in the prime of his life. And then, in the spring of 2009, Gus Raspitha, ‘70 Ph.D., a club member, died of ALS. And with three strikes, you have to do something. I felt it was a sign that [the walk was] exactly what we should do.”McCarthy said others must understand “the fierce headwinds” PALS and their caregivers go through every day. But ALS still has no cure. Kronenberger, who does cancer research, provided insight into why he believes students should come out to the walk. “One of the things that is unique about our university is the undergraduate research component,” he said. “ALS research is something that some students might be really interested in getting involved in but just have no idea what ALS is or don’t know how to find involvement opportunities.”McCarthy said he was hopeful the walk would be successful. “The real dream would be that we inspire one of these young brilliant minds to run with the ball after finding out firsthand just how devastating this disease is,” he said. The donations page will remain open the week following the walk.Tags: ALS, ALS Walk, Mid-Hudson Valley Club, neuroscience club Notre Dame students, faculty, alumni and community members from the surrounding area will walk to raise awareness and monetary support for ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) in St. Joseph County on Saturday. The walk is sponsored by the Neuroscience Club and the Notre Dame Club of the Mid-Hudson Valley. “ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes the neurons in the central nervous system to break down, and the Neuroscience Club focuses on anything from the brain to all the neurons in your body,”  Neuroscience Club co-president and junior David Kronenberger said.last_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgPeople on campus may see men wearing less clothes than a normal South Bend February day would typically require and holding out Solo cups with a request for money Wednesday. If so, they should not be alarmed — it’s just Siegfried Hall’s signature event, Day of Man, in full force.As it is the 13th year for the event, Siegfried has the basics down for the Day of Man: wear skimpy clothes — most often their bright event t-shirts, shorts and flip-flops — to class and around campus all day and ask for donations that will go to the South Bend Center for the Homeless. Observer file photo According to sophomore Kieran Wurl, one of four event commissioners, the Day of Man first originated when a Siegfried resident forgot his coat one cold winter day, and realized others less fortunate than he dealt with the cold in this fashion every day. “He realized that there are people in the South Bend community that are homeless and go through it every day, fighting the South Bend cold wind. So he gathered a group of his friends, went out and started asking for money for donations for the homeless and then it kind of turned into a Siegfried tradition from then on,” Wurl said. Wurl said members of Siegfried will collect money in-person all day Wednesday, as well as through a Venmo account — @DayOfMan2019. Each section in the dorm will take shifts at both dining halls during high traffic times, and will also be outside of DeBartolo Hall in the morning. While the temperature for this year’s event will be above freezing — around 40 degrees — Wurl hopes it will go down some. “The standard is flip-flops, shorts and a t-shirt, but people can go over or under that … we want to just try to actually put yourself in the shoes of a homeless person to experience what they might be feeling,” Wurl said. Apart from its signature event, Siegfried maintains a relationship with the South Bend Center for the Homeless and tries to help the center and its residents whenever possible. Patrick Davis, a senior commissioner for the event, said a couple dorm members help out at the shelter every weekend, and the dorm has worked with the clothing company Patagonia to donate coats. “It goes beyond just the day itself and more has to do with Siegfried’s relationship with the Center for the Homeless,” Davis said. “We send a couple of kids every weekend to the Center every weekend to help out with whatever they need — cleaning up, organizing clothes, food or just sitting and talking with the residents. … We want people to see another side of South Bend that not many Notre Dame students have seen.”Over the years, Siegfried has raised a combined total of about $130,000 in donations, and $18,000 last year alone. According to Wurl, the hall’s goal for this year is to reach — and potentially break — the $20,000 mark. “We’re just hoping that members of the Notre Dame community will feel generous,” Wurl said. “I know it’s going to be warmer this week than last week,” Davis said. “But I’m sure everyone can remember what it was like to be outside last week, and imagine what it would be like to be stuck outside for longer than a few minutes.” Davis and Wurl mentioned the steps South Bend has taken in the last week in light of the extremely cold weather to open their doors to anyone in need, and touched on the homeless issue the entire country faces. “There’s several hundred people who depend on the Homeless Center. … Kids, women, children and families are depending on the Homeless Center for their meals, and in situations like last week with staying overnight on days where it’s very cold,” Wurl said. “So there’s really a need for it in the South Bend community, but honestly all over the United States it’s also a problem.”Tags: dorm events, philanthropy, Siegfried Hall Day of Man, South Bend Center for the Homelesslast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgWhat makes a wage just or unjust? The Just Wage Working Group is working to spark dialogue around this question through the development of the Just Wage Tool and Framework, a Higgins Labor Studies Program initiative through the Center for Social Concerns.The web tool was released on Friday, and is currently available through the Just Wage Working Group’s website. It allows users to check boxes to determine, according to seven criteria, how just a wage is. Though this tool has only recently been developed, the Just Wage Project was initiated in 2016 by Dan Graff, director of the Higgins Labor Program and a professor in the History Department, and his colleague Clemens Sedmak, professor of social ethics in the Keough School of Global Affairs and concurrent professor at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns.“[Sedmak and] I gathered faculty and students from various disciplines on campus (management, economics, sociology, law, history, etc.) to pursue the question: What makes any given wage just or unjust?” Graff said in an email. This pursuit led to their development of the “Just Wage Framework” on which the tool is based.“We came up with a just wage framework of seven interconnected criteria that, to us, define a just wage, and we created a related online tool for stakeholders — whether professors, policymakers or practitioners — to use,” Graff said. “The criteria are as follows: a just wage affords a decent life to a worker and the worker’s household; a just wage promotes asset building; a just wage provides social security; a just wage is inclusive and non-discriminatory; a just wage is not excessive; a just wage is informed by workers’ participation in its creation; a just wage reflects performance, qualification and type of work.”The tool is not intended to calculate an exact value of what constitutes a just wage, Graff said, but rather to provide an idea of how well a wage satisfies the seven criteria of a just wage.“Importantly, once a person uses the tool, checking on a sliding scale of 1-5 the importance or satisfaction of every indicator in all the criteria, the result will show not a dollar figure or a point total, but a hexagon of seven honeycombs representing the criteria, each one shaded more gold the higher the scale that’s met,” Graff said. “There will also be suggestions for resources to learn more about any criteria that are being less met.”Senior Anna Scartz, a student assistant for the Higgins Labor Program, described the tool’s purpose in an email. “This is designed so that people can evaluate if their wage is just in accordance to their needs and Catholic Social Teaching,” Scartz said. “It will not give a numeric value, but speaks to the overall needs and human dignity of the worker. … It can start the conversation for what each party is looking for.”The tool is designed for use by both employers and employees, Graff said.“An employer or entrepreneur might measure her pay and benefits package or proposed employment policy against our tool,” he said. “A union activist or parish advocate might discover ways to measure a community’s jobs profile or ideas for building a campaign; a policymaker might consult the tool before proposing legislation.” A major goal of the tool, Graff asserted, is to raise awareness of growing income inequality.“We look around and see so many people working full time (in one, two, or even three jobs) and barely being able to make ends meet, while we also see the number of billionaires and millionaires increasing — so we wanted to contribute to a conversation that asks, ‘Why is this happening?’ as well as look for ways to promote a fairer and more equitable division of the economic pie,” Graff said.Kevin Christiano, an associate professor of sociology and a faculty affiliate of the Higgins Labor Studies Program, said in an email the tool is meant to impact many communities.“The tool is intended to reach far beyond the Notre Dame campus — to businesses, labor unions, schools, churches and numerous other institutions,” Christiano said. The Just Wage Working Group invites those interested to attend the official unveiling of the tool on Nov. 15 at 12:30 p.m. in the Geddes Hall coffeehouse.Tags: Center for Social Concerns, Higgins Labor Program, Higgins Labor Studies Program, just wage, Just Wage Tool and Framework, Just Wage Working Group, labor, Wageslast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_img Bryan Cranston Nathan Lane See Jason Robert Brown Play Live Jason Robert Brown, the music maestro behind The Bridges of Madison County, 13, Urban Cowboy, Parade, The Last Five Years and the upcoming Honeymoon in Vegas, is going to be making his SubCulture debut. Yes, you will be able to catch the Tony winner playing live, in an intimate setting, with his band the Caucasian Rhythm Kings on August 4 in the Big Apple. We’ll be there! Broadway Alums Christopher Walken, Nicole Kidman & Maryann Plunkett Will Star in The Family Fang Broadway alums Christopher Walken, Nicole Kidman and Tony winner Maryann Plunkett will star in The Family Fang. Helmed by Jason Bateman, the movie follows a brother and sister who return to their family home looking for their famous parents, who have vanished. Patrick Stewart and Bryan Cranston Team Up Stage and screen legend Patrick Stewart and Tony winner Bryan Cranston will join Broadway alum Ron Perlman in lending their voices to mobile game Family Guy: The Quest for Stuff. According to The Wrap they will be battling against an evil octopus monster. Or something. Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today.center_img View Comments Nathan Lane Teases Modern Family Spin-Off Nathan Lane, who is set to return to Broadway next month in It’s Only a Play, is also teasing us about what’s in store for his Emmy-nominated role in Modern Family. According to Deadline, the Tony winner remarked about his character in the TV show, wedding planner Pepper Saltzman: “I don’t know if I will ever see that spin-off, A Dash of Pepper, but…I think we could do something!” We’d definitely be up for watching that! Star Files Patrick Stewartlast_img read more


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