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first_imgYou’re not getting the best flavor from your vegetable garden if you’re not growing your own herbs, too. On “The Georgia Gardener” May 13 and 15, host Walter Reeves and guest Wayne McLaurin will talk about herbs as they plant the 10 leading herbs for gardens in the Southeast.Walter will show how and when it’s best to spray roses for black spot, too. He’ll also examine different kinds of hose-end sprayers and help you pick out the best for you. Finally, he’ll show how to divide the seedlings you buy from your garden shop and get more plants for your money.”The Georgia Gardener” is designed especially for Georgia gardeners. It airs Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 10 a.m. on GPTV. The show is a production of the University of Georgia  College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and PFC Holding Company.last_img read more


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first_imgDear EarthTalk: With all the talk of desalinization of ocean water for drinking, what do we know about the impacts this might have on climate, ocean salinity and other natural processes?                                                                                                                         — Fred Kuepper, via e-mail Due to its high cost, energy intensiveness and overall ecological footprint, most environmental advocates view desalinization (or desalination)—the conversion of salty ocean water into fresh water—as a last resort for providing fresh water to needy populations. Sourcing fresh water from streams, rivers, lakes and underground aquifers and adhering to strict water conservation measures are much more viable for both economic and environmental reasons in most situations, although some desert regions with thirsty and growing populations may not have many such options. The relationship between desalinization and climate change is complex. Global warming has increased droughts around the world and turned formerly verdant landscapes into near deserts. Some long held fresh water sources are simply no longer reliably available to hundreds of millions of people around the world. Meanwhile, expanding populations in desert areas are putting intense pressure on existing fresh water supplies, forcing communities to turn to desalinization as the most expedient way to satisfy their collective thirst. But the process of desalinization burns up many more fossil fuels than sourcing the equivalent amount of fresh water from fresh water bodies. As such, the very proliferation of desalinization plants around the world—some 13,000 already supply fresh water in 120 nations, primarily in the Middle East, North Africa and Caribbean—is both a reaction to and one of many contributors to global warming. Beyond the links to climate problems, marine biologists warn that widespread desalinization could take a heavy toll on ocean biodiversity; as such facilities’ intake pipes essentially vacuum up and inadvertently kill millions of plankton, fish eggs, fish larvae and other microbial organisms that constitute the base layer of the marine food chain. And, according to Jeffrey Graham of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography’s Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, the salty sludge leftover after desalinization—for every gallon of freshwater produced, another gallon of doubly concentrated salt water must be disposed of—can wreak havoc on marine ecosystems if dumped willy-nilly offshore. “For some desalinization operations,” says Graham, “it is thought that the disappearance of some organisms from discharge areas may be related to…the salty outflow.” Of course, as supplies of fresh water dwindle, the economic cost of desalinization—especially in coastal areas with easy access to ocean water—begins to look competitive with traditional water sourcing. To date there are about 300 desalinization plants in the United States, with 120 in Florida and less than 40 each in Texas and California. Some 20 additional plants are planned for the coast of California in the coming years, unless environmentalists extolling the virtues of conservation and wielding low-flow shower heads and toilets prevail. CONTACT: Scripps’ Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, www.cmbb.ucsd.edu. GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.phplast_img read more


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first_imgNCUA named members of its examination flexibility working group Tuesday, and thevast majority are CUNA members. Last week, NCUA Chair Rick Metsger announced the formation of the group, which will provide a recommendation on extending the examination cycle.“We’re pleased to see that the vast majority of this important working group are CUNA member credit unions,” said Elizabeth Eurgubian, CUNA’s deputy chief advocacy officer. “Our member credit unions, as well as CUNA, look forward to working with NCUA to hopefully provide meaningful relief to credit unions.”The working group, chaired by NCUA Region 4 director Keith Morton, will consist of six separate groups working by region. The group will report to the board within 120 days of the agency’s May 19 meeting.Metsger’s announcement on the working group came in conjunction with his announcement that NCUA would take a look at modernizing examination and supervision processes. This includes the agency’s Enterprise Modernization Initiative, a request for information about call reports and more. continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


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first_imgIn that hour we spent w/him, David Carr showed all the traits that made him beloved: idiosyncratic, hilarious, so authentic & deeply human.— Glenn Greenwald (@ggreenwald) February 13, 2015 “I think working in journalism beats having a real job” — David Carr #RIPDavidCarr @nytimes— Sarah Walters (@SWaltersTV) February 13, 2015 In an email to the Times staff, executive editor Dean Baquet called Carr “the finest media reporter in his generation.” Very few will argue that point.Carr, an incredibly talented writer, had a knack for measured—and sometimes searing—critiques of the industry in his weekly column, “Media Equation.” He was also one of journalism’s fiercest defenders. In a world filled with instant outrage, Carr was a calming influence. Carr’s column was considered required reading for everyone from media moguls and Hollywood executives to little-known journalists, politicians and regular readers drawn to his intellect and beautiful prose.Upon learning of his death, journalists took to Twitter to espouse widespread praise about Carr’s work and his life.Brian Stelter, who worked with Carr at the Times before becoming CNN’s senior media correspondent and host of the Sunday morning media show “Reliable Sources,” said he viewed Carr as a father figure.My heart is broken.— Brian Stelter (@brianstelter) February 13, 2015 There was no one whose criticism of my work I trusted more than @carr2n, and no one whose praise meant more to me.— a. o. scott (@aoscott) February 13, 2015 I loved David so much. He’s been the closest thing I had to a dad. About girls, bosses, life — he always knew what to say, what to do.— Brian Stelter (@brianstelter) February 13, 2015 We all looked to @carr2n to make sense of the media revolution & to contemplate the future. A future without him is terrible to contemplate.— Brian Stelter (@brianstelter) February 13, 2015 Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York For journalist David Carr’s legion of fans (Press reporters among them), Mondays will never be the same.Carr, the revered media columnist for The New York Times whose must-read weekly column in the paper’s business section each Monday served as a critique of the industry he loved, died unexpectedly Thursday. He was 58.Carr reportedly collapsed in the Times newsroom, according to the Times. He was pronounced dead at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital, the paper reported. Carr had hosted a much-anticipated “Times Talk” earlier in the evening with documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras, journalist Glenn Greenwald and NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.David Carr was a great journalist & a great person. He introduced us to his daughter after the event, who he was always praising. So sad-RIP— Glenn Greenwald (@ggreenwald) February 13, 2015 There’s so much to say about the life and career of David Carr. Here’s a start: http://t.co/uVobSZjUaq pic.twitter.com/hYByyHUbcT— The New York Times (@nytimes) February 13, 2015 A world without David Carr is a worse world.— Jake Tapper (@jaketapper) February 13, 2015 If only more journalists were as honest about their craft, and themselves, as David Carr…RIP, maestro.— Jose Antonio Vargas (@joseiswriting) February 13, 2015 David Carr vs Vice: The video that shows why Carr was such a force in journalism http://t.co/HMgTVaedjD via @Max_Fisher— Max Fisher (@Max_Fisher) February 13, 2015 David Carr was the journalist every reporter wants to be when they grow up. And rightfully so. RIP— Wesley Lowery (@WesleyLowery) February 13, 2015 Carr was born in Minnesota. Before rising to prominence at the Times, Carr worked at two alternative weeklies, Twin Cities Reader and Washington City Paper.When it came to his reporting, nobody was off limits, including Carr himself. In his brutally honest memoir “The Night of the Gun,” Carr wrote about his battle with drug addiction. He was also a cancer survivor.Carr’s career at the Times began in 2002. His star grew brighter in 2011 when the Times documentary “Page One” was released.“He was our biggest champion,” Baquet said in his memo to staffers, “and his unending passion for journalism and for the truth will be missed by his family at The Times, by his readers around the world, and by people who love journalism.”Journalists React to Carr’s Death:last_img read more


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first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRepublicans also not putting America firstMr. Homan’s Feb. 3 letter should have been entitled “Politicians are not putting America first” and not just single out the Democrats.I’m a registered Republican, and I wonder why is it when a Trump Republican cult member makes an argument such as his, they never present the fact that the Republicans and Mr. Trump had control of both the Senate and the House for the past two years and they didn’t pass a single piece of legislation to give Mr. Trump his precious wall or any immigration reform.He asks why the Democrats all supported border security previously, including a wall, but oppose it now? He conveniently forgets that the bipartisan bill in December that included all these things was not signed by Mr. Trump.He also notes Democrats are importing more low-income persons illegally. And just how are they doing this importing? By not voting for a wall that persons can climb over or tunnel under?And then he goes even further by saying the Democrats can’t stand to see Trump win to fulfill his campaign promise. Are you referring to the promise he made on numerous occasions that Mexico would pay for the wall?Mr. Homan, if you want to put America first, why don’t you write to Mr. Trump and request he use his emergency powers to combat gun violence in Chicago and other parts of America?Mike NorrisDelanson Consider impact of negativity to TrumpYour opinion page is hurting this country. It’s all negative with the Trump administration. You’re not the only newspaper doing this unfortunate reporting. If we put one of these crazy liberals as president, we can kiss this country good-bye. I know this letter is going to be laughed off until it hits you personally. Please think of your children.Joseph ParilloBallston SpaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes I’m appalled that Gov. Andrew Cuomo passed the Reproductive Health Care Act.With this act, you are becoming the killer of thousands of unborn babies. This is truly a genocide against the human life — the weak, the handicapped and the poor —  starting with the womb, where life is created. The RHA was concealed in false propaganda. This act does not help women. It does the opposite. What’s next? Are we going to start selective breeding through involuntary sterilization because you have judged individuals physically or mentally unfit to reproduce? How far are you willing to go, governor? Babies, who are precious and innocent, have now become “undesirables” in New York state. A child in the mother’s womb isn’t even considered a human being anymore. My mother delivered me eight weeks early. Was I not considered a child to you? Are you not going to stand up for the unborn? No one has the right to kill a child in the womb or out of the womb. Just as Abel’s blood cried out to God for revenge (Genesis 4:10), so does the blood of the innocent babies cry out to God and demand justice. The Lord will be the one who will avenge these heinous sins. What you do to one of them is inflicted upon us all. It is truly a sad time for the state. I pray for you because Jesus tells us to pray for those who persecute us. God have mercy on us.Eva LoucksBallston Spa Legal pot. Gambling. Is prostitution next?Now that we are moving forward to legalize recreational marijuana and expanding gambling, the time is right to add the world’s oldest profession to the list: prostitution. Consider the following:The governor has said he isn’t legislating morals or religion; everyone has a fundamental right to decide what they want to do with their own bodies; current laws have a greater impact on minorities; state regulation and rules will make it safer for those involved; and the state will enjoy a new stream of revenue. Who can be against this?Jim VincentNiskayunacenter_img What is the cost of not building the wall?Ken Bress’ Jan. 19 letter illustrates poor calculation in the cost of building “the wall.” But can Ken calculate the cost of one human life affected by opioid addiction or myriad felonies (too heinous to mention here) perpetrated by illegal immigrants?Eric R. AlmondScotia Cuomo endorses the legal killing of babieslast_img read more


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first_imgThe World Bank’s transportation specialist, Elena Chesheva, said the government should continue with the consolidation of small contracts into larger ones of more than Rp 30 billion ($2.1 million) to attract bigger firms.“Such measures are expected to increase efficiency in procurement and attract new, larger players to the market with the economy of scale and stronger quality assurance system,” she said.The size of large contracts has been increasing over the years, with 72 percent of the spending packages recorded to be above Rp 30 billion, rising from 31 percent in 2013, according to the World Bank’s report.The government is also urged to decrease its reliance on state-owned enterprises (SOE) to execute toll and national road projects, while allowing private companies to build economically viable projects as SOEs were already highly leveraged.“We recommend that the government revise its decision-making [process] and consider whether the project is good for leveraging private financing before looking at the potential allocation for public-sector financing,” Elena said.The World Bank’s report shows that the liability-to-equity (LE) ratio of SOEs involved in toll and national road development projects has already reached a high level.Toll road operator Jasa Marga, construction company Waskita Karya and Hutama Karya’s average LE ratio in 2017 stood at 3.8, more than twice as high as the average LE ratio for comparable private firms in emerging markets.In the water and sanitation sector, the World Bank report found that the majority of city and regency-owned tap water companies (PDAM) were relying heavily on government subsidies as they were operating in a state of loss. This had hampered efforts to upgrade into using the PPP framework.“From more than 400 PDAMs across Indonesia, only 10 percent are financially healthy. Half of the PDAMs don’t even impose fees on their customers that could cover their full costs,” the World Bank’s water and sanitation specialist Irma Magdalena Soetiono said.Additional investment was critical for the government’s target of 100 percent access to clean water and improved sanitation services, according to the World Bank.Between 2001 and 2016, Indonesia spent only an average 0.2 percent of its GDP to develop and improve water and sanitation systems, the same rate as the Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic.“We urge the PDAMs to improve their financial condition, so that, in the future, they can be supported with nonpublic funding,” Irma said.Responding to the World Bank’s recommendations, Herry said the government divided infrastructure projects into “solicited” and “unsolicited” projects based on the project’s economic viability to increase private funding through PPP schemes.Infrastructure projects that were initiated and mostly funded by the government were labeled as “solicited”, while the private-company-initiated projects that were economically viable were labeled “unsolicited”.“For example, in toll road projects that are not viable, we assign Hutama Karya to run the project. However, it is a corporate decision to invest in toll roads that are viable,” he said.Topics : The government has increasingly been relying on the private sector to take part in developing, financing and managing the country’s ambitious infrastructure projects under the National Medium-Term Development Plan (RPJMN) to ease the strain on the state budget.The National Development Planning Agency (Bappenas) has estimated that the country will need infrastructure investment worth US$429.7 billion, equal to 6.1 percent of GDP, between 2020 and 2024.The government could only finance 30 percent of the infrastructure projects using the state budget, said the Public Works and Housing Ministry’s financing strategy director, Herry Trisaputra Zuna.“I believe what we need to do is use our limited budget to encourage the private sector rather than concentrating on conventional [funding] efforts,” Herry said during Thursday’s webinar. The World Bank has urged the Indonesian government to improve public-private partnership (PPP) financing schemes to attract more private capital that could fill the government’s budget shortage on infrastructure projects.“Mobilizing capital for financing infrastructure has been challenging for some sectors, particularly water resource management, where the infrastructure has been considered to be public assets and private-sector financing hasn’t been successful to date,” said World Bank energy coordinator Stephan Garnier.Garnier said Thursday during a webinar called Indonesia Public Expenditure Review 2020: Spending for Better Results that inadequate project planning may have also dampened interest from the private sector to invest in transportation.last_img read more


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first_imgErdi Dabi, the deputy regent of Yalimo, Papua, is suspected of killing policewoman Chief. Brig. Christin Meisye Batfeny in a car crash. The accident occurred Wednesday in the South Jayapura district of Jayapura, Papua, at around 7:30 a.m.Police suspected that the deputy mayor was driving under the influence of alcohol, adding that the suspect was not carrying his driver’s license or vehicle registration at the time. “Our provisional conclusion is that the […] driver was not careful and was driving under the influence of alcohol,” Jayapura Police chief Adj. Sr. Comr. Gustav Urbinas told kompas.com on Wednesday.Read also: Two soldiers killed, 13 severely injured in road accident in PapuaAccording to reports, Erdi, along with one passenger, was driving at high speed toward the Entrop area of South Jayapura when he lost control of his car and swerved to the right lane. He then crashed into Christin, who was riding a motorcycle from the opposite direction. Gustav said the incident was recorded by a CCTV camera. “Due to the car crash, Christin suffered serious impact to the back of her neck, which resulted in her death and her right knee was torn and fractured,” Gustav said.He added that Erdi and the passenger in his car were undergoing a medical check-up at Jayapura Regional General Hospital to determine their blood alcohol level. Erdi was elected in 2017 as the deputy to Regent Lakius Peyon, with both expected to serve until 2020. Erdi, however, was set to run for the regency’s top office in December’s simultaneous regional elections.National Police chief Gen. Idham Azis signed a telegram in August to suspend all criminal investigations in cases implicating potential or registered candidates for regional elections. (mfp)Topics :last_img read more


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first_img Share 31 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Share Tweetcenter_img EntertainmentHealthLifestyle Angelina Jolie to have more surgery by: – March 13, 2014 Angelina Jolie has confirmed she will have more cancer-preventing surgery, after a double mastectomy last year.The 38-year-old actress had the procedure after discovering she was at high risk of developing breast cancer.“I decided to be proactive and to minimise the risk as much I could,” she said at the time.Now in an interview with Entertainment Weekly she said she is “very happy” with her decision to have the operation.“There’s still another surgery to have, which I haven’t yet. I’ll get advice from all these wonderful people who I’ve been talking to, to get through that next stage,” she said.“I was very fortunate to have great doctors and very, very fortunate to have a good recovery and have a project like Unbroken to have something to be really focused on, to be getting healthy for, and to be able to just get right back to work.”She said she has had a lot of support from the public.“I was very, very moved by all the support and kindness from so many people.”The mother-of-six has previously explained her reasons for having the surgery, arguing she needed to minimise her risk after her mother died from ovarian cancer aged 56.In an article entitled My Medical Choice, she explained that her mother fought cancer for nearly a decade.Jolie’s partner, Brad Pitt, praised her choice as “absolutely heroic”.The Hollywood star’s doctors estimated she had an 87% risk of breast cancer and a 50% risk of ovarian cancer, because of genes she had inherited.Prof Hani Gabra, Director of the Ovarian Cancer Action Research Centre at Imperial College, said women with the BRCA1/2 gene mutation have “a very stark choice”.“Medical science currently has limited options to help these women beyond removal of the breasts and/or ovaries,” he said.“However, by choosing to have a preventative hysterectomy and removing the ovaries and fallopian tubes will significantly reduce the chance of developing ovarian cancer.”Prof Gabra added: “By removing the ovaries the woman will lose her fertility and go through the menopause, which will be more sudden than going through it naturally and more slowly and increase her risk of developing osteoporosis and other conditions.“This obviously has significant impact especially if the woman is still planning a family. For any woman worried about this, they should discuss it with their doctor.”BBC News Sharelast_img read more


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first_imgMinnie L Harmon, 95, of Lawrenceburg, Indiana passed away Friday, June 24, 2016 in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.She was born Wednesday, February 9, 1921 in Lee County, Virginia, daughter of the late John L. Ketron and the late Lillie Carter Ketron.Minnie worked for Liebel Flarsheim, retiring after several years of service.She was a member of Mooney’s Chapel Christian Church in Whitley County, she also attended Friendship Baptist Church in Groesbeck, Ohio. She loved to crochet, read, and also enjoyed yard work and gardening. Her faith and family was very important to her.Surviving are daughter, Mary (Larry) Eckhoff of HVL, Lawrenceburg, IN; grandchildren, Donald (Karen) Eckhoff of HVL, Lawrenceburg, IN, Brian (Marisa) Eckhoff of Cheviot, OH; great-grandchildren, Angie Eckhoff, Maria (Kyle) Rader and Sarah Eckhoff, brother, Glen (Shirley) Ketron of Harrison, OH.She was preceded in death by her parents, her loving husband of 54 years, Frank Harmon, and several siblings, Mable Ridener, Beatrice Barnet, Arthur Ketron, Loyd Catron and Jim Ketron, as well as, several half- brothers and half-sisters.Friends will be received 5:00 – 8:00 PM, Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at the Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, Aurora, Indiana.Graveside Service will be held at Corinth Cemetery, Corbin, Kentucky 40701 on Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at 1:00 pm.Contributions may be made to the Friendship Baptist Church or Jennings County Hospice. If unable to attend services please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more


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first_imgWe were able to pull off a close win against South Dearborn 25-23, 25-20, 26-24. I ran a new rotation trying to see if the changes could help us against the Connersville game this week. It was a working progress but they worked hard and over came obstacles to take the win. Meredith Bohman had a great night at the net with 10 kills and 6 blocks. Rachel Bischoff had 2 kills, 3 digs, and 1ace. Kaitlyn Obert had 1 kill and 2 assists. Anna Sacksteder had 1 kill and 2 blocks. Jalynn Rogers had 5 digs. Jenna Orschell had 2 digs and 2 ace serves. Megan Getz had 2 ace serves and 5 assists. Makyah Richardson had 5 blocks and 3 assists. Kelly Layton had 4 assists, 1 dig and 1 ace serve. Kelsey Vail had 1 dig. Layne Steele had 1 block. We travel to Connerville Wednesday, Sept.12th. JV start 5pm. We are FC!!! Courtesy of Wildcats Coach Jill Merganthal.last_img read more