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first_img Mr. Seaga was one of the founding fathers who framed the Jamaican Constitution in 1961. Members of the Senate, today (May 31), observed a minute of silence for the former Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Edward Seaga. Members of the Senate, today (May 31), observed a minute of silence for the former Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Edward Seaga.Mr. Seaga, who was Jamaica’s fifth Prime Minister, died in a hospital in the United States on May 28, where he had been receiving treatment.  He was 89 years old.Senate President, Thomas Tavares-Finson, informed that a joint meeting of the Houses of Parliament will be held in tribute to Mr. Seaga.“In due course, we will be notified of those arrangements,” he said, noting that at that time, members will be able to place on record their substantive tributes.Acting Leader of Government Business, Senator Kavan Gayle, hailed Mr. Seaga as one of the builders of modern-day Jamaica.“We are deeply saddened by his passing. We must commend him for the tremendous work that he has done for this nation,” he said, noting that Mr. Seaga devoted his life to serving his country.“There are communities that would be in mourning now. His own West Kingston constituency that he developed, the musical fraternity to which he played a tremendous role, the Parliament, and in the latter part of his life, the tremendous contribution he made to the football federation,” he said.He extended deepest sympathies to Mr. Seaga’s family in their moment of bereavement.For her part, Leader of Opposition Business, Donna Scott-Mottley said Mr. Seaga is part of the political, social and economic fabric of the country.“He is woven into the history.  He is the last serving member of the committee that charted the course of Jamaica’s Independence. Although he was not born here in Jamaica, there is no one that can challenge the fact that you could not have found somebody more Jamaican. He impacted our music and impacted our culture, and history will show that he was into institutional building,” she said.She said the relationship between Mr. Seaga and the people of Tivoli “was truly a paternalistic one, and I know that they are mourning, intensely, the loss of their father”.Mr. Seaga was one of the founding fathers who framed the Jamaican Constitution in 1961.He initiated a rewrite of the Human Rights section of the Constitution to provide for a Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms, and created the office of public defender.The former Prime Minister was also a member of the first Parliament of independent Jamaica.When Mr. Seaga retired from representational politics, he accepted a post as Senior Research Fellow at the University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona campus, and was later named Chancellor at the University of Technology (UTech) in 2010.He served as President of the Tivoli Gardens Football Club, and chaired the Premier League Clubs Association.During the sitting, the Senate also recognised other outstanding Jamaicans who passed during the week.They include former Chief Photographer at the Jamaica Information Service (JIS), Errol Harvey; political commentator and academic administrator,  Martin Henry; Roman Catholic priest, Monsignor Stanley Shearer who is the brother of former Prime Minister Hugh Shearer; and former President of the Methodist Church in Jamaica, Reverend C. Evans Bailey. He served as President of the Tivoli Gardens Football Club, and chaired the Premier League Clubs Association. Story Highlightslast_img read more


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first_imgNew Delhi/Mumbai: The Enforcement Directorate Wednesday carried out fresh searches in Mumbai in connection with its money laundering probe in the multi-crore IL&FS payment default crisis, officials said.The residences and offices of at least four directors of the firm are being raided in Bandra, Khar, Nariman Point and Goregaon area of the metropolis, they said. Some documents have been recovered during the searches, the officials said. The central agency had first carried out searches in this case in February after it filed a criminal case under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA). Also Read – Pak activated 20 terror camps & 20 launch pads along LoCThe searches are aimed at collecting additional evidences and documents, they said. The debt crisis at the infrastructure lender came to light following a series of defaults by its group companies beginning September, 2018. IL&FS has defaulted on payment of loans to SIDBI and along with its subsidiaries has a combined debt of over Rs 91,000 crore. The ED’s case is based on an FIR filed before the Economic Offences Wing (EOW) of the Delhi Police in December last year. Also Read – Two squadrons which participated in Balakot airstrike awarded citationsAshish Begwani, director of Enso Infrastructures (P) Ltd, had filed the case against officials of IL&FS Rail Ltd for allegedly causing Rs 70 crore loss to his company by fraudulent means. Begwani had alleged in his complaint that in August 2010, he was approached by two officials of IL&FS Transportation Networks Ltd and he had invested Rs 170 crore in IL&FS Rail Ltd, a special purpose vehicle for Gurugram Metro project, in order to take its 15 per cent shares. “However, over a period of time, the complainant observed that the company was not performing profitably and funds were being misused,” an EOW official said quoting Begwani’s complaint. The Enforcement Directorate (ED) will probe if funds generated illegally in this case were laundered to create illegitimate assets by the accused. The crisis-ridden infrastructure conglomerate IL&FS group, once hailed as a pioneer of public-private partnership, has come under the scanner of multiple regulators for alleged defaults related to financial disclosures and corporate governance.last_img read more


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first_imgHALIFAX – Five years ago, Melanie Mackenzie got pregnant. Her birth control had failed, and the then 29-year-old knew she didn’t want to have a baby. She wanted an abortion.“I found out I was pregnant almost immediately. You just get that feeling,” the Halifax resident said in an interview. “I hadn’t even missed a period yet.”After taking a positive home pregnancy test, Mackenzie went to her family doctor — Nova Scotia is the only province in Canada where women must obtain a physician’s referral before making an abortion appointment.“I said flat out ‘I’m pregnant and I don’t want to be. I want an abortion.’”Mackenzie was told there was a waiting period, and was sent for a battery of tests including blood work and an ultrasound. It took two months for her to finally obtain an abortion, at nearly 12 weeks pregnant.“It was the worst two months of my life,” she said. “The whole thing felt like a punishment.”Advocates say Nova Scotia is now one of the most difficult provinces in the country in which to access abortion, with women requiring a referral for a surgical abortion, lengthy wait times for the time-sensitive procedure and no provincial coverage for medical abortions using pills.The province also has no private or freestanding abortion clinics located outside of a hospital. Halifax’s Morgentaler clinic, where women had to pay out-of-pocket, closed in 2003.The Termination of Pregnancy Unit at Halifax’s QEII Health Sciences Centre — where more than 85 per cent of the province’s abortions are performed — will only book appointments for women who are at least eight weeks pregnant.With few doctors prescribing the abortion pill Mifegymiso — and no universal coverage of the costly medication in the province — women seeking to terminate early pregnancies are forced to wait.“Nova Scotia is one of the worst places in Canada to get an abortion. The situation for abortion access is extremely grim,” said Darrah Teitel, public affairs officer for Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights.After her blood work came back positive, Mackenzie recalled the nurse congratulating her on the pregnancy in front of other patients.“I never regretted my decision to have an abortion,” she said. “But it felt like that waiting period and all those tests were to shame me, to make me feel like an irresponsible slut, to punish me. It felt like it was a price I had to pay to obtain an abortion in a country where my right to choose is legally protected.”In Canada, abortion care is a patchwork of widely differing degrees of accessibility and options depending on the province and region. Abortion access is largely provided in big urban centres, leaving women in small communities or rural areas footing the bill for travel and accommodation.Nova Scotia once had the region’s least restrictive abortion access, but both New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island have changed their policies in the last three years.In 2014, New Brunswick lifted the so-called two-doctor rule requiring two physicians to certify an abortion as medically necessary.Abortions became available in P.E.I. for the first time earlier this year. Women on the Island can call a toll-free number to make an appointment without the need for a referral.Women in Nova Scotia still require a referral and tests before obtaining an appointment for an abortion.“We do require our patients to get referred to our clinic,” Lianne Yoshida, medical co-director of the QEII’s Termination of Pregnancy Unit, said in an interview. “It’s been identified as a barrier and it’s an issue we’re working on. The issue of referral and ultrasound does delay a woman’s ability to see us.”It also may be unconstitutional, said Teitel.She said the provincial rule requiring a physician’s referral is at odds with the Supreme Court’s 1988 R v. Morgentaler decision. Evidence presented during the trial showed that the unnecessary wait times involved in physician referrals were creating unsafe conditions for women, Teitel said.“These delays are still being forced on women in Nova Scotia, and there is no earthly reason why abortions cannot be granted upon self-referral, as in the rest of the country,” she said.In addition to the referral rule, it’s unclear whether delays are exacerbated by a policy enforcing a wait time, restrictions on early abortions or simply a lack of sufficient resources.While Yoshida said there are surgical issues with abortions performed too early, she said that tends to be around four weeks gestational age.Still, a receptionist reached at the QEII clinic said abortions are not scheduled before eight weeks — something confirmed in multiple interviews.Nova Scotia does not appear to keep statistics on how long it takes women to obtain an abortion after a referral.Several women interviewed for this story spoke on condition of anonymity out of fear of the stigma surrounding abortions and the backlash they could face at work or in the community.Their stories had recurrent themes. The condom broke. The pill didn’t work. The IUD shifted. Contraception fails. Accidents happen.While some were referred for an abortion by a family doctor without delay, others describe having to “jump through hoops” to get a referral. Wait times tended to be four to six weeks, a delay they described as “agonizing” and “cruel.”Jennifer Fishman, associate professor in the Biomedical Ethics Unit of the Social Studies of Medicine Department at McGill University, said the ethical problems that arise from making women wait for an abortion are enormous.“The idea that there is differential access to abortions across the provinces, given that abortion is funded and legal and a medical procedure covered under the Canada Health Act, which operates under principles of universality and accessibility, is incredibly problematic,” Fishman said. “It’s unjust and inequitable to make some women wait while others don’t have to.”Another ethical problem is the mental health impact of waiting, she said.“There is definitely a psychological cost to carrying an unwanted pregnancy,” Fishman said. “Some research shows women will even consider some kind of self-induction, which can be dangerous.”One woman told The Canadian Press she had four appointments with her family doctor before she obtained a referral for an abortion. Her doctor quizzed her on her knowledge of the fetus and sent her to a psychologist before finally agreeing to refer her.“At some point, before my doctor agreed to write the referral, I remember standing in the kitchen with a pair of scissors, thinking maybe I’d just cut it out. I considered going to the emergency room and saying I would commit suicide if they wouldn’t give me an abortion. The waiting, and the threat of not being able to access an abortion, was emotionally traumatic.”Fishman said another troubling issue with making women wait until later in their pregnancy to obtain an abortion are the physical health risks.“Second trimester abortions have much higher rates of complications,” Fishman said. “It’s a much more complicated procedure. They are higher risk and they are more expensive.”Meanwhile, a new method has emerged that would give Nova Scotia women another option in early pregnancy.Mifegymiso, an alternative to surgical abortion, is an abortion pill that can be used to terminate a pregnancy of up to 49 days.Advocates say the two-step process using the drugs mifepristone and misoprosto could increase access, provide women with more choices and shorten wait times.The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada says 171 physicians and pharmacists in Nova Scotia have either registered for or taken a training course on Mifegymiso.But at a cost of about $350, the pill remains out of reach for many women.While Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick have all said they would provide at least some coverage for the drug, Nova Scotia has stayed silent on the issue.A Health Department spokeswoman said the Nova Scotia government is looking at coverage for Mifegymiso, but a decision has not yet been made.Meanwhile, it’s unclear why women in Nova Scotia must obtain a referral.Health spokeswoman Sarah Levy MacLeod confirmed that a referral and an ultrasound are required before an abortion can be booked, but she referred questions on the policy to the Nova Scotia Health Authority.The health authority referred questions to the co-director of the QEII Termination of Pregnancy Unit — the same doctor, Lianne Yoshida, who called the need for a referral a barrier to access that needs to be addressed.“I don’t think it’s necessarily political. It’s sort of just the way it’s always been,” Yoshida said. “It’s recognized as a problem.”last_img read more


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first_imgAPTN National News WINNIPEG—Aboriginal Peoples Television Network will know in six to nine months whether it can launch a sister station in the United States, according to the network’s CEO.APTN CEO Jean Larose said the network has partnered with global consulting firm Castalia to determine whether there is enough interest among U.S. cable and satellite television service providers to carry the proposed channel.Larose said meetings with cable and satellite providers are ongoing, according to an email sent to APTN employees Wednesday morning.“APTN is quite excited at the possibility of launching a sister station in the US based on the programming and community focus of service in Canada. The initial response from Native American producers, organizations and artists has been overwhelmingly positive and supportive,” said Larose, in a statement provided to APTN National News. “However, we must first ensure that there will be sufficient revenues to fully cover the costs of such a channel and in order to determine this, we have partnered with Castalia to do this research on our behalf.”Larose said it could take between six to nine months to determine whether there is enough interest to launch the channel. APTN wants to first ensure that it has enough signed commitments for carriage before making the new channel a reality, he said.“We have no idea yet if there will be interest…to launch a service like ours in the States. However, the only way to find out is to start a public discussion,” said Larose in the email.news@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more


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Rabat – The Moroccan-Egyptian crisis has provided an opportunity for building a better future for relations between the two countries, Moroccan Foreign Minister Salaheddine Mezouar said Thursday in Rabat.This trend is illustrated by the visit of the Egyptian Foreign Minister to Morocco on January 15-16, which laid the foundations for a strong, strategic and renewed partnership, Mezouar said at a parliamentary meeting.In this regard, Mezouar recalled the position of Egypt, which has expressed its commitment to the kingdom’s territorial integrity, noting that all these efforts were crowned by the phone conversation between King Mohammed VI and Egyptian President Abdelfettah Al-Sissi. “Hostile parties to Morocco were seeking to exacerbate the Moroccan-Egyptian crisis,” Mezouar said, adding that these parties have used the same methods and tried to take advantage of the new situation in Egypt to seek new enemies of the kingdom’s territorial integrity. read more


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UNHCR spokesperson Jennifer Pagonis told reporters today that the agency completed the distribution of aid this week to IDPs living along a 30-kilometre stretch of road between Mogadishu and the town of Afgooye. In total, as many as 300,000 former residents of the capital live in a tangle of some 200 crowded and rudimentary settlements, and this week’s distribution targeted the most vulnerable people within that group. Ms. Pagonis said it took UNHCR two days to transport the aid 30 kilometres because of the numerous checkpoints set up along the road by both soldiers and militiamen who demand money in return for safe passage. As part of the aid, which arrived as the annual rainy season began, each family received one plastic sheet, one kitchen set, three blankets and six sleeping mats. A second round of aid distribution will soon begin for another 40,000 IDPs in Afgooye and on the immediate outskirts of Mogadishu, while a separate but similar programme aims to provide relief to an estimated 12,000 people who fled recently to the seaside town of Marka. Somalia, which has not had a functioning national government since 1991, has been beset by increasingly brutal fighting this year between Ethiopian-backed Transitional Federal Institution (TFI) forces and Islamist insurgents, particularly in Mogadishu. Yesterday the Security Council adopted a resolution deploring the violence and deteriorating humanitarian situation and asking Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to press ahead with contingency plans to deploy a possible UN peacekeeping force to replace the under-resourced African Union force known as AMISOM. 16 May 2008The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has provided aid to more than 40,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Somalia who live in precarious conditions in dozens of makeshift settlements west of the capital, Mogadishu. read more


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TORONTO — The Toronto Real Estate Board says the number of homes sold last month in the Greater Toronto Area dropped 37.3 per cent compared with a year ago as the number of listings rose.More Coming.


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Sri Lanka’s Johann Peries successfully summited Mount Everest at 5.55 am Nepal time today Tue 22 May 2018.This was his second attempt. Peries now becomes the second Sri Lankan to summit Mount Everest Everest after Jayanthi Kuru Utumpala in 2016. An artist inspired by nature, Johann is a hair-designer by profession and adventurer by choice. He is the only Sri Lankan male to reach an altitude of 8,400m / 27,559ft, which he achieved on 21 May 2016 on Mt Everest.His passion for the great outdoors and his creative soul has struck a perfect balance and is evident in his work, life and interests. Peries’ earlier attempt in 2016 was unsuccessful when his oxygen tank failed 400 metres before the summit. Peries has now begun his descent which is considered more treacherous at times than the ascent, Peries’ local team in Colombo said. Johann began his hair-designing career 25 years ago. Opting for originality over formulaic, he soon became popular as one of the best hair-designers in the country. Taking his innate flair in the beauty and fashion culture a step further, he re-established the local industry to meet international standards by introducing new concepts in bridal-designs, attire conceptualizing and make-up.Today he is one of the most sought after hair and beauty designers, and amongst the few Sri Lankans in the industry to be globally acclaimed. Presently he runs three salons, two in Colombo and one in London. His career as an artist began long before his venture into the fashion industry; initially as a professional singer with Mary Anne Singers spanning over 20 years, as an actor in the local English theatre, and as a professional dancer competing and performing at local and international competitions.Johann’s interest in exploring the great outdoors was impressed upon him at a very young age by his father, when the duo regularly explored the Knuckles Mountain range in Sri Lanka. The passion thus instilled in him, drives him to conquer mountains both in Sri Lanka and around the globe. His first exploration out of Sri Lanka was the Thai- Burmese border, in 2005. As a more experienced mountaineer Johann successfully conquered Everest Base Camp in 2010, Island Peak in 2012, and Mt. Kilimanjaro in 2014. read more


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(Updated)A date for the Robert Badgerow’s fourth murder trial has been set, but it won’t begin until September 2016. We take a look at this case and why it’s bounced around the legal system for three decades.Former Hamilton steelworker Robert Badgerow is a man who is forever connected, rightly or wrongly, with a murder.Badgerow from November 2011: “On her death alone, I had nothing to do with that. I’m sory the young woman met the end that she did but it wasn’t at my hand.”It was June 20th, 1981 when Diane Werendowicz was killed. Her body was found in the Stoney Creek area. She had been sexually assaulted and strangled.The case went cold until 1998 when police used DNA evidence to match with Badgerow. He was convicted, then on appeal the conviction was overturned. A second trial ended in a hung jury, as did a third. And now, a fourth will take place 35 years after the murder.Jeff Manishin, criminal defense lawyer with Ross and McBride: “I don’t view it as amazing. It’s unusual.”Jeff Manishin is a criminal defense lawyer, who says that this case is unique in the number of times Badgerow has gone to trial: “But because it’s a human system so many things are possible.”In Manitoba, Thomas Sophonow went through 3 murder trials with the last ending in a hung jury in 1985. The crown did not proceed further, but Sophonow also remained connected.Tom Sophonow from a YouTube video: “It was a cloud hanging over my head. I was still guilty, I was still considered a murderer.”In 2000, police found evidence which exonerated Sophonow. Manishin was reluctant to predict if this will be the final trial for Badgerow, but: “I would say this, that if this trial ended in a hung jury again, no doubt, the defense would seek a stay of proceedings in the future.”The difference for the fourth Badgerow trial is that evidence which had previously been deemed inadmissible will now be included. That evidence: 2 days after the murder, a 911 call was made. The call was traced to a pay phone just a few hundred feet from where Badgerow was working. read more


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by The Canadian Press Posted Jun 7, 2013 5:17 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email TORONTO – Some of the most active companies traded Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the TSX Venture Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (12,373.30 down 36.04 points):B2Gold Corp. (TSX:BTO). Miner. Down 11 cents, or 4.47 per cent, at $2.35 on 9.29 million shares. The gold sector led the losers on the main index, dropping 5.25 per cent to 197.11 points. The price of the August bullion slid US$32.80 to $1,383 per ounce.Perseus Mining Ltd. (TSX:PRU). Miner. Down eight cents, or 7.69 per cent, at 96 cents on 8.65 million shares.Air Canada (TSX:AC.B). Airline. Up a penny, or 0.44 per cent, at $2.27 on 4.19 million shares.Uranium One Inc. (TSX:UUU). Miner. Down a penny, or 0.36 per cent, at $2.76 on 3.99 million shares.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Plane and train maker. Unchanged at $4.92 on 3.65 million shares.Toronto Venture Exchange (951.40 down 0.02 point):EastCoal Inc. (TSXV:ECX). Coal miner. Unchanged at two cents on 9.11 million shares. The Vancouver-based company closed a $7.7 million private placement, with proceeds to be used for capital expenditures, debt payments and to consolidate the group’s working capital position.Porto Energy Corp. (TSXV:PEC). Oil and gas. Up two cents, or 66.67 per cent, at five cents on 3.44 million shares.Company reporting major news:Royal Bank of Canada (TSX:RY). Bank. Up 17 cents, or 0.28 per cent, at $59.99 on 2.97 million shares. Canada’s biggest bank says it will hike its mortgage rates in the range of one-tenth to two-tenths of a point, depending on the type of mortgage. Most actively traded companies on the TSX, TSX Venture Exchange markets read more


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first_imgOne in Four clients’ engagement with the Christian Brothers is often adversarial and legalistic and deeply distressing to them. In the case of the Kiltegans a major problem exists in that complaints of child sexual abuse made against priests working in developing countries have not been addressed.“Only 12 Christian Brothers are convicted despite complaints against 325 Brothers: across the border in Down and Connor there are only 3 convictions out of 42 priests against whom allegations have been made. The same pattern exists elsewhere.”Lewis concluded by saying that while improvements were to be welcomed, work needed to be continued to ensure that children are kept safe in the Church.Read: Just 12 Christian Brothers convicted after 870 allegationsRead: Cardinal Brady says he is ‘truly sorry’ to survivors ONE IN FOUR, the advocacy group that represents survivors of clerical abuse, today said that the reviews by the Catholic Church’s National Board for Safeguarding Children have been met with an overly legalistic response by the Christian Brothers.Today’s publishing of the reports shows that just 12 convictions have been made on the back of 870 allegations against 325 Christian Brothers.While One in Four welcomed the publishing of the reports, they said they were disappointed with the response of the Christian Brothers.Maeve Lewis of One in Four said that the findings of the report, which said that the Christian Brothers were too quick to resort to legal recourse, were in keeping with what the survivors of abuse had experienced.last_img read more


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first_imgGreece’s jobless rate scaled a new record high of 22.5 percent in April from a revised 22 percent in March, the country’s statistics service ELSTAT said on Thursday, as a fifth year of recession continued to take its toll on the labour market.Greece depends on financial aid from the European Union and the International Monetary Fund, who have imposed budget cuts that have caused a wave of corporate closures and triggered job losses.Unemployment in Greece is almost twice the average jobless rate in the 17 countries sharing the euro.Source: Reuters Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img


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first_imgA new group of soy leaders headed to Washington, D.C. this week to learn more about being an effective advocate for their farms and the entire industry.The American Soybean Association’s (ASA) fourth class of Advocacy Communications Team (ACT) members spent the week learning how to share their story, advocate on issues that affect their farms, and engage the consumer public. Training involved policy issue updates, on-camera interviews and social media best-practices.ACT, a program sponsored by Bayer Crop Science, is a network of soybean farmers from across the country, diverse in experience and background, with a passion for interacting with consumers and the media to help more Americans discover the good work and promise of modern agriculture.For more information on the Advocacy Communications Team, contact Chris Luelf at cluelf@soy.org or call 314-576-1770.last_img read more


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first_imgParis: The French government on Friday warned the two candidates vying to become Britain’s next prime minister that the Brexit divorce deal was not up for renegotiation, echoing warnings from Brussels. Former London mayor Boris Johnson, a Brexit figurehead, faces Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt in a run-off vote to decide who takes on the tricky task of piloting the country’s departure from the EU. Also Read – EAM Jaishankar calls on European Parliament President David Sassoli Advertise With Us Johnson is the runaway favourite. Both men have said they want to renegotiate the deal that outgoing Prime Minister Theresa May spent two years brokering with Brussels but which was rejected three times by the British parliament. The EU insists there is no alternative to May’s deal. “If the United Kingdom wants to leave the Union and to leave in an orderly fashion, the deal on the table is the deal we negotiated over two years,” France’s European Affairs minister Amelie de Montchalin told members of the Anglo-American Press Association of Paris. Also Read – This is why Denmark, Sweden and Germany are considering a meat tax Advertise With Us De Montchalin said Johnson, Hunt “and all the others”, including the opposition Labour and Liberal Democrats, were “welcome” to negotiate with the EU on the declaration on future UK-EU relations that accompanied the Brexit deal. But “to reopen the withdrawal agreement, the position of the Council (of EU leaders) is very clear, it’s: ‘no’,” she said, echoing remarks last week by European Council president Donald Tusk and European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker. Advertise With Us EU leaders have been at pains to conceal their dismay at the prospect of Johnson, a Brexit hardliner accused of grossly misleading voters about the repercussions of quitting the EU, becoming Britain’s next leader. On Friday, Johnson was again at the centre of controversy after it emerged that footage of him calling the French “turds” while foreign minister was cut from a BBC documentary at the request of his office. The comments referred to France’s Brexit stance, the Daily Mail reported Friday, citing a confidential government document. De Montchalin refused to comment on the reported remarks, which Johnson said Friday he had “no recollection” of making. “I prefer not to comment on words I don’t understand because there were not part of the vocabulary I learned in school,” De Montchalin said. She added France and the EU would work “with whichever prime minister is chosen by British institutions.”last_img read more


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first_imgYonat Shimron YonatShimron Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Pentecostal pastors vow to fight proposed Uganda church regulations in court News Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Tagsconfirmation First United Methodist Church Omaha homepage featured Judicial Council LGBTQ Top Story United Methodist Church,You may also like By: Yonat Shimron YonatShimron Share This! Share This! Catholicism Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — United Methodists across the U.S. have protested the global denomination’s crackdown on LGBTQ members in all kinds of ways.But now a group of teens in a confirmation class at a historic United Methodist church in the Midwest has taken the unprecedented step of refusing to join the church.Eight teenagers, aged 13 and 14, who make up this year’s confirmation class at First United Methodist Church in Omaha, Neb., stood before the congregation on Confirmation Sunday (April 28) and read a letter saying they do not want to become members at this time.The teens said they took their stand on principle because they believed the denomination’s vote to uphold and strengthen its ban on LGBTQ ordination and marriage to be “immoral” and “unjust.”“We are concerned that if we join at this time, we will be sending a message that we approve of this decision,” the confirmation class wrote.“We want to be clear that, while we love our congregation, we believe the United Methodist policies on LGBTQ+ clergy and same-sex marriage are immoral,” they said.The eight teens received a standing ovation. As is customary following confirmation, the church treated the youth to dinner: lasagna and salad and a gift of journals for each teen.Since the February vote at a special session of the General Conference in St. Louis, some Methodist churches across the United States have protested through newspaper ads. Others rallied in front of their church administrative offices. Still others voted to withhold their annual dues, called apportionments.But this is the first known refusal to join the church at the end of confirmation, a formal rite of passage that includes education in the faith. Traditionally, confirmation classes spend a year learning about Christianity, the history of the United Methodist Church, its social principles, its polity, and what it means to be a member.They then decide if they want to join the church as members.In keeping with First United Methodist of Omaha’s history of confronting its denomination’s policies, the Rev. Kent Little, pastor of the church, supported his young people. “Myself and our associate pastor are in full support of their decision,” he said. “We’re proud of them. It’s not an easy thing to do to resist.”First UMC Omaha Confirmands by RNS on ScribdThe congregation, which predates the establishment of the state of Nebraska in the 19th century, now has about 350 active members.In 1997, its then pastor, Jimmy Creech, performed a same-sex blessing for two women on church grounds. After a church member complained, Creech was put on trial and defrocked.More recently, the church council voted to host same-sex weddings should its clergy choose to perform them and to withhold funding, or apportionments, to the denomination for the remainder of the year.Even supporters of the church’s LGBTQ bans acknowledged that the confirmands’ decision was novel.“I’m not aware of anything like that having occurred,” said the Rev. Keith Boyette, president of the Wesleyan Covenant Association, a group that supports the ban on LGBT clergy.Referring to the confirmation class’ joint letter, Boyette said he’d be “surprised if they wrote it themselves.”But Tim Fickenscher, a retired junior high school teacher who taught the confirmation class, said the adults had little to do with it. (The confirmands did not want to speak individually to reporters but only as a group.)The idea originated about a month ago, Fickenscher said, when two girls announced they didn’t want to join a denomination that denies LGBTQ full rights.Fickenscher explained what that meant. For one, they wouldn’t be allowed to vote at churchwide meetings. He also made it clear that others in the confirmation class may have different opinions.But in the end, the other youth decided they, too, wanted to join in the protest.“It was a very thoughtful, well-discussed decision,” Fickenscher said. “We tried to give the kids as much latitude in decision-making as we could.”LGBTQ advocates react to the Traditional Plan being adopted at the UMC General Conference on Feb. 26, 2019, in St. Louis. RNS photo by Kit DoyleOn Friday, the United Methodist Church’s top court upheld most of the February vote regarding LGBTQ.The Judicial Council also ruled that a clergy member who performs a same-sex wedding will face a minimum one-year suspension without pay for the first offense and a loss of credentials for the second.The new rules will take effect in January 2020.The council also upheld an “exit plan” that allows churches to leave the denomination with their property over decisions made at the special session.That is something First United Methodist is considering.Little, who came on as pastor in July, said the church council voted on April 2 to hold small group discussions about whether to remain in the United Methodist Church. He said the church would consider three options: staying and continuing to resist church rules in solidarity with LGBTQ people; affiliating with another denomination such as the United Church of Christ, which gives LGBTQ people full rights; or becoming an independent, non-denominational congregation.In the April church newsletter, Little wrote that “a significant part of the church of my youth and the church I have fought so hard for these last 27 years of my ministry died in St Louis this past February.”But he said he would remain as pastor as long as the church would have him. Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Widow of Mother Emanuel pastor: ‘Much prayer is needed’ four years after a … center_img News • Photos of the Week Yonat Shimron Yonat Shimron is an RNS National Reporter and Senior Editor.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 By: Yonat Shimron YonatShimron By: Yonat Shimron YonatShimronlast_img read more


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first_img Share PexelsGetting help with homework, having someone teach you how to take notes and even just getting a full night’s sleep are often privileges that kids in poverty don’t have.The Dallas Morning News reports so what if there was a way to mimic such a home life, which usually is organic in middle class and affluent families?Dallas businessman Randy Bowman says he knows how to do that — by creating an urban boarding experience that’s similar to those at private elite boarding schools. Children would still attend their local schools but spend the week living in communal residence halls with structured support to help them grow academically and socially.The idea may seem extreme at first. But after Bowman spent a year researching urban education and the challenges students face, over and over again, it boiled down to one thing: poverty.Children living in the poverty — which is nearly one out of three kids in Dallas — have to overcome trauma that can include homelessness, hunger, illnesses and even violence. Those are challenges not easily dealt with during regular school hours.“The 71 percent of the day that you spend at home overwhelms the 29 percent that you spend at school,” Bowman said. “Our premise is that home is not a problem. The home is simply under-resourced. We just want these kids to have a fair shot at reaching the highest level of potential.”He recently kicked off his campaign to raise an initial $2.5 million it will cost to build two starter facilities in South Dallas and staff them for the first two years. The program would be open to 16 kids at first, but the hope is to have four homes serving up to 200 students in first through sixth grades at each site he runs.Bowman, 54, is well-known across Dallas. He was a corporate lawyer when he transitioned to entertainment with a client list that included Vanilla Ice. He also founded his own logistics business and took the lead on the Parkland Foundation board that raised millions for the new county hospital that opened in 2015.But Bowman identifies with the children struggling in South Dallas as much as he does the city’s power brokers.Bowman grew up in Pleasant Grove and was raised by a single mother. And he can tell you exactly how many times she was able to help him with his homework from elementary to high school: twice.Her time was spent trying to juggle jobs and raise four children while dealing with various illnesses. When he hears comments about Dallas parents not caring enough to be engaged with their children, he takes it personally.His mom was his hero. So when he looks for ways to give back to the community, she’s always on his mind as he thinks about what would have helped her along the way. He says that’s what drives this passion project for him.“The reason an after-school program is great but can’t quite fill the bill is because we could never — as a family — convince the ravages and challenges of poverty to organize themselves neatly and attack us during a two-hour period after school,” he said. “That’s not the way it works. It attacks you throughout the clock, overnight.”He sees the boarding experience as a way to insulate kids from some of the chaotic and traumatic forces that can quickly derail academics, while giving their parents more flexibility to work or learn new skills.Across the street from South Oak Cliff High School, Bowman looks at 4 acres of land now covered with trees and some scattered debris. He purchased it with his own money just a few months ago to be the first site for his project.Paul Quinn College President Michael Sorrell has agreed to share space on his campus to open a second location for the boarding experience. Students from the college would also work with the program to provide tutoring, support and some overnight supervision that will include other staff.“Randy’s program just opens up a treasure-trove of possibilities,” Sorrell said at a recent education forum, sponsored by Sen. Royce West, where the idea was unveiled. For example, the college could use the residence halls during the summer months for Paul Quinn’s own programs.Some ideas may seem a bit romanticized, such as having grandparents from the neighborhood work as morning counselors to help get the children ready for school each day. But Bowman sees that as a practical solution to boosting neighborhood support and keeping the kids part of the community.There are a handful of urban boarding schools across the nation specifically geared toward helping kids living in poverty. The most well-known are run by charter school operators who have entrance requirements that include enrolling kids who have been in the foster care system, who are homeless or who have faced other traumatic experiences.Some struggled initially with students fighting, throwing chairs and causing other disturbances. But a 2012 study by a Harvard economist found that low-income kids in one such boarding school with 24-hour support had significantly higher math and reading scores than kids who didn’t get into the program, setting them on track toward increasing their potential for higher future earnings and decreasing their chances of committing crimes.Bowman said he’s met with organizers from some of those groups to learn from their challenges but he’s made it clear that doesn’t want to start his own school.Public schools themselves aren’t really the issue. Poverty is, he said, so why spend time reinventing an entire system?He estimates it would cost about $52,000 per student to offer the program during the startup year, then drop to about $16,000 the next year and even further after that. But families participating wouldn’t have to pay anything. He’s looking for donations to cover the bill.Bowman shopped the idea around first, making sure he had support from key elected officials and pastors. He’s met with local psychology experts to make sure arrangements wouldn’t be detrimental to kids. He surveyed local parents to gauge interest.At the recent forum in South Dallas, pastor Stephen Brown listened to the pitch with deep curiosity. Brown is a former teacher who serves at the Greater Bethlehem Baptist Church.“The concept is shocking, but I’m still very interested,” he said. “I think there’s so much potential. It’s going to be a leap for families, but those who have reached the end of their capacity might be more apt because they are stretched to the max already.”Bowman realizes it’s a big ask to have parents trust someone else with their children and says the program won’t be right for all families. A key to making this project successful is community buy-in to make sure parents aren’t stigmatized for their choice, he said.Affluent and middle class families often turn to outside support to help their kids succeed and that’s called good parenting, he said.“We don’t question how it is that the resource got on the shelf, we just label it an act of good parenting,” he said. “If a poor person reaches up on the shelf and brings this resource down that we’re providing so their children can have a better education, shame on us if we call that anything other than good parenting.”Bowman has applied for several grants. He hopes to break ground on the first residence hall later this quarter and start serving the first families as soon as next school year.last_img read more


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first_img X 00:00 /08:20 Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz/Houston Public MediaHFD Chief Samuel Peña emphasizes that improving fire safety inspections in Houston will entail using a new risk-based model and a modern records management system. Listen Houston’s Fire Chief says he wants to increase ambulance fees. In the audio above we hear from Chief Samuel Peña at a press conference held this morning (July 13), where he says this would be the first hike in six years, aside from adjustments for inflation.We talk with Dr. Cedric Dark, assistant professor of emergency medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, and Dr. James Langabeer, professor in the UTHealth School of Biomedical Informatics, about proposed hikes in ambulance fees and why the chief wants these higher fees. Then, we consider the potential impact this hike could have on Houstonians.center_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sharelast_img read more


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first_imgSource = e-Travel Blackboard: G.A <a href=”http://www.etbtravelnews.global/click/21dd7/” target=”_blank”><img src=”http://adsvr.travelads.biz/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=10&amp;cb=INSERT_RANDOM_NUMBER_HERE&amp;n=a5c63036″ border=”0″ alt=””></a> Jetstar is cleaning house in preparation for future growth and has restructured management with Bruce Buchanan at the head of the table…still.Mr Buchanan, currently Jetstar chief executive will become the Jetstar group chief executive, and will “focus on [Jetstar’s] expansion into new markets,” Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce said.David Hall will come across from Qantas to take up the newly created role of Jetstar chief executive, Australia and New Zealand, where he will oversee the introduction of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner to the Qantas Group fleet.The role of Jestar chief executive, Asia, Chong Phit Lian, will be expanded to look after Jetstar investments and businesses in Asia and building its Singapore long haul flying hub.“This change in structure…will ensure we are well placed to successfully expand our footprint to new markets throughout Asia,” Mr Joyce said.“The Jetstar brands have grown significantly since inception six years ago, cementing Jetstar as a leading low fares airline across Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the South Pacific,” he added.last_img read more


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first_imgGlobal Stars Top AchieversQantas Holidays Qantas Holidays and its associated brands recently hosted the 2018 Global Stars Top Achievers Trip on a luxury journey through India, courtesy of Insider Journeys and flying Thai Airways.L-R: Back Row: Mohan Narayanaswamy (Insider Journeys / Travelscope India), Steve Brady (Qantas Holidays), Jill Johansen (Helloworld Travel Mackay)Front row: Carly O’Bryan (Travel & Cruise Belrose), Claire Rymer (Helloworld Travel Esperance), Angela Kaluzyn (Skilled Travel)The group visited Delhi, the Taj Mahal, Jodhpur and Udaipur and experienced local life in more remote areas of Rajasthan. The achievers were treated to stays at some of India’s finest hotels including the Imperial Delhi, Raas Jodhopur and Rass Devigarh, a stunning fort-turned-hotel. The trip finished with an exclusive rooftop dinner at the luxurious Taj Lake Palace in Udaipur where the group dined under the stars to the backdrop of Udaipur’s City Palace.“India is a magical destination and an experience unlike any other. It was wonderful to be able to reward our Top Achievers with a truly memorable trip” said Steve Brady, National Sales Manager Qantas Holidays.“The quality and level of experience of the Insider Journeys team in developing and delivering this trip was a testament to their knowledge of the destinations and their expertise in delivering small group and independent experiences across Asia.” “India is a life changing experience for anyone who has the opportunity to travel to this wonderful destination. The colours and magic of India have to be seen to be believed. I have waited a long time to experience this destination and it really has exceeded my expectations in so many ways,” said Jill Johansen from Helloworld Travel Mackay.The Global Stars program for 2019 just launched and will see travel agents have the opportunity to travel to Dubai or cruise Alaska with Crystal Cruises. More details can be found here TOP IMAGE:Taj Lake Palace, Udaipur. L-R: Abhijeet Khichi (Insider Journeys), Claire Rymer (Helloworld Travel Esperance), Steve Brady (Qantas Holidays), Carly O’Brien (Travel and Cruise Belrose), Angela Kaluzyn (Skilled Travel), Jill Johansen (Helloworld Travel Mackay)last_img read more