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first_img Read Full Story When it comes to statistical analysis, “context matters,” according to Jesse Berlin. “Different people look at the same data and come to different conclusions.”This was one of the issues discussed by Berlin, ScD ’88, in a talk about challenges he’s encountered as a biostatistician on October 31, 2013 in FXB-G13 at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH).Berlin was on campus to receive the Lagakos Distinguished Alumni Award, which recognizes biostatistics alumni whose research in statistical theory and application, leadership in biomedical research, and commitment to teaching have had a major impact on the theory and practice of statistical science. The award was established to honor the career of Stephen Lagakos, an international leader in biostatistics and AIDS research, and former HSPH professor of biostatistics and chair of the department, who died in a car accident in 2009.Berlin has worked in both academia and in industry. He served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania for 15 years, became senior director of statistical science at Johnson & Johnson in 2004, and now is vice president of epidemiology at Janssen Research & Development, LLC, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary.last_img read more


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first_imgDell EMC Data Protection has been named an Advanced Technology Partner in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Partner Network (APN). AWS Technology Partners provide software solutions that are hosted on, or integrated with, the AWS platform.As an Advanced Technology Partner in the APN, Dell EMC’s integration with AWS creates a powerful cloud backup and recovery solution so customers can deploy and scale the right-sized cloud data protection strategy. Dell EMC Data Protection helps customers protect workloads on AWS to enable greater operational efficiency, performance and scalability throughout the entire cloud journey.Dell EMC offers a complete portfolio of cloud solutions and services for protecting our customers’ data as they embark upon their digital transformations to the cloud including:Cloud backupCloud disaster recoveryCloud tiering and long-term retentionVMware Cloud on AWS data protectionSuperior Deduplication: Brings together industry-leading deduplication (average 55:1 deduplication rate) for data residing both on premise and in the cloud, Dell EMC Data Protection boosts performance and throughput while reducing the consumption of object storage required by up to 71 percent when doing a backup – all sent encrypted to Amazon S3.Increased Efficiency: A single protection instance that can support up to 6 PB of data in Amazon S3. Additional instances can easily be deployed to increase overall scale and flexibility. For additional efficiency, Dell EMC can protect up to 2,000 clients and 1,000 concurrent sessions with a single protection server.Lowest TCO: Customers can lower their monthly in-cloud data protection costs up to 68 percent when compared to other leading competitors.*Most recently, Oath, Inc., a global enterprise digital media company, was able to reduce its data protection costs by 67 percent while realizing increases in scalability and overall performance. Oath now protects a massive AWS environment, including over 40,000 instances of Amazon EC2 and Amazon EBS, and over 70 petabytes of data stored on Amazon S3, with Dell EMC.Customers like Oath turn to Dell EMC and AWS to enhance its speed, scale, flexibility, availability, and resiliency while gaining powerful enterprise data protection for its cloud workloads.ResourcesRegister for our May 15 Webinar: 70 Petabytes, One Cloud Backup Solution: The Oath StoryDell EMC & AWS Microsite: www.dellemc.com/awsProtect VMware Cloud on AWS – learn more.Discover Your Cost to Protect in the Cloud – TCO CalculatorVisit Dell EMC in the AWS Marketplace*Economic Value of In-Cloud Data Protectionlast_img read more


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first_imgEditor’s note: This article is one in a series profiling the dorms. Previous articles have covered dorms built before Dillon Hall.Approximately 87 years ago, Dillon Hall opened to residents, funded by Knute Rockne and a 1925 Rose Bowl victory for Notre Dame.The hall is named after Fr. Patrick Dillon, the second president of the University of Notre Dame. The chapel is dedicated to St. Patrick but contains a side altar dedicated to St. Olaf, the patron saint of Norway, to honor Rockne, who was born in Norway. Though Rockne’s success with the football team was the source of funding for Dillon Hall, he never got to see it completed. The side altar was added after the chapel was completed to honor Rockne and his dedication to the university.“I love the location, I love the culture and I love the amount of guys in regards to [interhall] athletics,” Hayden Parkhill, a sophomore currently living in Dillon, said.After Notre Dame’s athletic success in the 1920s under Knute Rockne, the University built Dillon and Alumni Halls to house the growing student population. Along with Alumni, Dillon first housed students in the fall of 1931. Students, however, were asked to spend the first few weeks of the semester in South Bend houses while waiting for the residence halls to be completely finished, Fr. Paul Doyle, the rector of Dillon, said a member of the first class of Dillon residents told him.Next year, the residents of Dillon Hall will move into the currently unnamed building on McGlinn fields behind West Quad so Dillon itself can undergo renovations. Though the students would traditionally move into Pangborn during the reconstruction, Dillon Hall contains so many residents that it would be impossible to fit all of them into Pangborn, Doyle said.Doyle said he hopes the renovations preserve the windows above the doors in Dillon, known as transoms.“We’re the only dorm left with transoms that work. I hope they survive the rehabilitation,” Doyle said in regards to the renovations.Dillon Hall is well-known across campus for its Thursday night “Milkshake Mass.” In 1997, Doyle started the milkshake mass to encourage questions about faith and fellowship among students. As another positive, Doyle said, the free milkshakes offered around 10:45 p.m. every Thursday give students a reason to avoid going off campus to socialize.“The chapel holds 170 people, [but we always have] people sitting on the floor,” Doyle said.When asked what they enjoyed most about living in Dillon, both Parkhill and Doyle said the community that comes along with being such a big residence hall was extremely important to them.“You get put in a dorm by the computer, yet each dorm has its own personality based on the students who are here. The creativity of the student leadership is a really big deal,” Doyle said. “It’s so edifying to be around such good young people, and all my classmates who come back say that. … Surely, the best part about [being rector] is the students.”Tags: Dillon Hall, dorm community, dorm features, Milkshake Masslast_img read more


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first_imgNew tomato varieties are typically bred for disease resistance,high yields and how well they ship. But food scientists are searchingfor tomatoes that taste good, too.”We know there’s a lot of consumer dissatisfaction whenit comes to store-bought tomatoes,” said Rob Shewfelt, afood scientist with the University of Georgia College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences.”What we want to find out,” he said, “is whatconsumers don’t like about the flavor and what can be done aboutit.”The tomato project research team includes Shewfelt; Jay Scottof the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center in Bradenton,Fla.; Liz Baldwin of the U.S. Department of Agriculture SubtropicalFruit Station in Winter Haven, Fla.; and Harry Klee of the Universityof Florida.What do consumers want in a tomato?”A lot of work has been done on genetic modification oftomato flavor,” Shewfelt said. “But no one I know ofhas defined the quality standards from the consumer’s standpoint.”With USDA funding, the team evaluated more than 50 tomato typesfrom Scott’s collection. “We wanted to test several selectionsso we would have a wide range of tomato flavors,” Shewfeltsaid.The evaluated tomatoes were picked half-ripe and breaker (whenthe tomato is just showing signs of ripening).Klee looked at the differences in the genes of the selections.Baldwin tested the tomatoes using a chemical flavor analysis.UGA-trained and nontrained consumer panelists then tasted thesamples, rating their flavor “great,” “acceptable”or “not acceptable.””We found the characteristics for ‘great’ are differentfrom those of ‘acceptable,'” Shewfelt said. “A premiumtomato would obviously be one our consumers ranked as ‘great.'”The selections were ripened before the taste tests. Paneliststhought some tasted great when picked table-ripe. But they rankedthe same tomatoes unacceptable when picked at the breaker stage.Some varieties rated pretty good whether they were picked ripeor at breaker. And some, Shewfelt said, tasted great when pickedred-ripe, “but if you picked them breaker, they tasted justawful.”Until now, breeders picked the best tomatoesEvaluating flavor has always been a part of tomato varietyselection, Shewfelt said. But until now, the breeders did thetasting.”Breeders taste them when they are ripe, and they choosethe varieties based on how well they ship,” he said. “Butsince tomatoes aren’t shipped ripe, we’re looking for selectionsthat are acceptable when picked breaker (unripe) and allowed toripen.”The researchers are close to defining what consumers like.They’re also identifying the tomatoes consumers rank highest andcomparing their flavor characteristics.”Once we identify the ones with really great flavors,we can work with geneticists to identify the genes that causethese flavors,” he said. “Then we can screen selectionsfor these genes and not have to put each through the consumertests.”Shewfelt’s goal is to identify varieties consumers will acceptso commercial packers can develop a tomato brand name shopperswill grow to recognize.”If you knew reliably, eight times out of 10, you’re goingto be happy when you buy this tomato, you’d probably be willingto spend more money for it,” he said. “It’s going totake a lot of integration to get to that point. But we’re wellon the way.”Until the research is completed, shoppers have to keep gamblingwith tomato taste at the supermarket.Grape tomatoes best bet for tasty tomatoes”You can buy grape tomatoes,” Shewfelt said. “Theyhave much more flavor than store-bought slicing tomatoes. Theyjust don’t work for hamburgers. But they’re perfect for salads.”Shewfelt said shoppers have grown to trust grape tomatoes tohave good flavor.”When I buy them, I know I’ve got a good chance of gettinga good-tasting tomato,” he said. “But when I buy big,slicer-type tomatoes, I have no clue as to whether it will haveany flavor.” Picture-perfect, slicer-type tomatoes from the supermarket may taste great. Or not. Food scientists are trying to make them more predictably tasty. Photo: Scott Bauer, USDA-ARSlast_img read more


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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Power generators across the U.S. are not only sticking to plans to retire coal-fired power plants despite the pro-coal Trump administration, they are touting the cost savings of doing so while pushing a further transition away from the fuel.Several utilities with the largest planned coal plant retirements confirmed they are not changing course after the administration finished the Affordable Clean Energy in mid-June, S&P Global Market Intelligence recently reported. Retiring coal plants and investing in other forms of generation is helping utilities across the country hit their own emission reduction targets while mitigating some of the risks coming from increased scrutiny around climate change, a review of power generators’ second-quarter earnings calls so far suggests.About 9.7 GW of coal capacity is expected to retire in 2019 alone, nearly as much as the 13.5 GW that came offline in 2018 when power generators recorded the second-highest level of coal retirements completed in recent decades. With natural gas prices at 20-year lows and showing no signs of increasing significantly in the near term, pressure on coal generators is likely to continue.“You know there was once a time when we had to make a sucker’s choice between clean and expensive energy or the cheap and dirty stuff,” said CMS Energy Corp. President and CEO Patricia Poppe on a July 25 call. “That just isn’t true anymore.”The Michigan Public Service Commission recently signed off on a CMS Energy plan that sets a path for the retirement of the company’s coal plants while adding 6,000 MW of solar energy in the longer term. The result, Poppe said, is not a “trade-off” but a “trade-up” as the transition supports “affordable bills, a cleaner environment and a higher quality mix of earnings.”WEC Energy Group Inc. Executive Chairman Gale Klappa said recent coal-fired power plant closures decreased the company’s operating and maintenance cost by an estimated $100 million on an annual basis. The utility recently shut down three of its less efficient coal-fired power plants in Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan.More ($): US power generators reporting savings, other benefits from phasing out coal Utilities reaping financial benefits from coal plant closures and turn toward renewableslast_img read more


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first_img August 1, 2003 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Associate EditorFor Eddie Mulock, who once served on The Florida Bar’s Board of Governors, the idea sprang to mind while stretched out in a hospital bed preparing for a heart transplant. After he’d been given one day to live, Mulock learned precious perspective: “Getting fills your pockets. Giving fills your heart.” If he survived, he vowed he’d work to create a summer camp for special-needs kids.For Norman Gerstein, an 11th Circuit judge, inspiration came from his own two young sons, now 5 and 9, realizing how much time and attention kids need to flourish. Yet, he realized, so many foster children don’t have the same opportunities to thrive and just be carefree kids. Many live in neighborhoods so dangerous they spend entire summers locked behind doors watching TV.They are two Florida lawyers, one in Bradenton and one in Miami, who looked beyond their own privileged lives and dreamed up a way to let kids be kids – with nurturing, constructive programs fueled by not-for-profit corporations they head. Both Mulock and Gerstein say the biggest reward for their charitable work is seeing the smiles on the faces of the children they serve.Since the Florida Bar News first reported about each program (Mulock’s in the August 15, 2001, issue, and Gerstein’s in November 1, 2002), much has happened, thanks to generous donations and grants that both programs need to keep going. Here are their progress reports: Foundation for Dreams A major heart attack sent Mulock to Shand’s Hospital in Gainesville, where he was connected to a heart and lung machine while awaiting a new heart. Within those stark and sterile walls, Mulock had met a lot of very sick children stuck in hospitals too, and he wondered what they had to look forward to. He’d found out about special-needs camps, but learned there were none on Florida’s West Coast, and pledged to do something about it. When he got out of the hospital in 1995, he got busy making good on his promise and created the Foundation for Dreams. It would take more than five years of preparation before the first campers arrived and “Mr. Eddie” greeted them with teary enthusiasm.On more than 200 acres of a little used Boy Scouts of America property, Camp Flying Eagle in East Manatee County has been transformed into Dream Oaks Camp, an inclusive, barrier-free campground for children ages 6 to 18, who are terminally ill, mentally and physically challenged, as well as at-risk kids.“The Foundation is to establish dreams, mine and theirs, to help these kids have fun like any other children,” said Mulock.“They don’t have to worry about anybody making fun of them, because a lot of kids are just like they are.”All-terrain wheelchairs roll along nature trails. A slanted wooden ramp brings disabled children to saddle level where they happily trot away on gentle horses. Downs Syndrome children snuggle in the bottom of canoes while counselors do the paddling down the Manatee River. Blind children create art for others to see.Water-skiing clinics provide two-on-one instruction, using adaptive “sit skis” adjusted to a child’s weight, height, and ability.Sailboats are completely accessible and give kids a chance to pull the lines and steer the boat.Golf clinics provide one-on-one instruction for children of all abilities, including adaptive equipment.Wheelchair sporting events include basketball, hand-cycling, and boccie.When the first campers arrived in the summer of 2001, Dream Oaks was open only as a day camp and served 56 children.This summer’s seven weeks of camp, Mulock is pleased to report, served about 200 campers—a 30-percent increase over last year—and there are also residential “sleep-over” camp programs thanks to donations that have financed the construction of cabins.Construction is completed on the first four of 10 cabins. Three new cabins — funded by the Kiwanis Club of Bradenton, the Sertoma Club of Greater Sarasota, and the Norton Family — are under construction and are scheduled to open in the fall. Those new cabins will provide space to serve an additional 30 children each week.The new residential cabins have sidewalks connected to the dining hall and Manatee Memorial Health Lodge, where a full-time nurse carefully doles out medications and checks blood pressure and monitors vitals, and doctors are on call.Renovations are finished on the Splash Pools Aquatic Center. A new fire pit and Rotary Pavilion have been built. Fishing excursions on a newly outfitted pond are a new attraction. The Pat and Charlene Neal Nature Center is an ecology building and aviary, where children bend over microscopes studying plants and animals. Thanks to the Pilot Club, there is a better sound system for dances and talent shows.Each week of camp is geared to a special group. For example, June 22-27 catered to campers with hemophilia and other blood-related diseases, and July 14-18 was especially for children with developmental disabilities.This year, one more week of camp was added — a residential outdoor adventure camp open to individuals of all abilities. In the spring and fall, the agenda has been expanded to weekend retreats.The Dream Oaks Camp provides 2-to-1 or 3-to-1 ratio of campers to counselor, based upon the needs of the participant.Staff has been hired from as far away as South Africa, Russia, and Great Britain. All staff completed a week of training and hold CPR and First Aid certifications.“Every time I see a parent or a caregiver of one of our campers, I become overjoyed to hear how the camp has made an impact on their child’s life,” Mulock said, telling of the time a mother cried to see her son laugh, a rarity in his challenged life.“The smiles and pure joy I witness when I stop out to camp would not be possible without the support of our friends.” For more information, contact the Foundation for Dreams, Inc. 2620 Manatee Avenue West, Suite D, Bradenton 34205; phone: 941-748-8809, email at info@FoundationforDreams.org, or visit the Web site at www.FoundationforDreams.org. Summer Fun for KidsIf you’re at the Miami Seaquarium, the Miami Museum of Science, the Miami MetroZoo, or a park in the Miami area and happen to see a swarm of kids in Day-Glo lime-green T-shirts, chances are they belong to Judge Gerstein.“You can see them a quarter-mile away,” says Judge Gerstein of more than 400 children taking part in his Summer Fun for Kids program wearing their special shirts.As the name suggests, the program is all about providing fun activities for kids, most who have been removed from their homes by the State of Florida because of abuse, neglect, or abandonment, and are in emergency shelter or foster care.“The mission is to improve the lives of at-risk children by providing them the opportunity to enjoy summer activities in safe, nurturing environments that promote the development of their creativity, self-esteem, and independence,” Judge Gerstein said.It all started in 1999 when Judge Gerstein and his wife, Jackie, general counsel for Children’s Home Society, reached into their pockets to send eight foster children to camp at Temple Judea. They wanted these children to experience some of the same advantages their own boys enjoy.That kind gesture to help eight children grew into a nonprofit program that reached more than 140 children the summer of 2001 and has now grown to serving 400-500 kids.“It’s growing faster than I ever thought it would,” said Judge Gerstein, who has a trusted board of directors that does the fundraising and applies for grants.They’re doing a good job. The rapidly expanding program has reaped grants from the Heckscher Foundation for Children, the George and Ethel Kennedy Family Foundation, and The Melissa Institute for Violence Prevention and Treatment — and that influx of money has made all the difference.That financial support has made possible three new programs. More than 100 children attend the National Football League’s Youth Education Town for 10 weeks of camp.And more than 200 children attend Shake-a-Leg, a sailing camp for persons with disabilities, where the program includes a week of sailing in unsinkable boats, motorboat trips, and kayaking on Biscayne Bay.Shake-a-Leg was able to use funds from Summer Fun for Kids as a match for funds from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in order to provide a greater number of camp opportunities for special needs children, including those with developmental and physical disabilities.“One of the hallmarks of our program is that we work out a collaboration with agencies. For example, the Children’s Home Society is watching their own kids. They case-manage their own kids,” Judge Gerstein explained.“The University of Miami people asked if we could devise field trips for the Pediatric AIDS clinic,” Judge Gerstein said. The idea, he explained, was these children have to take their drugs and go to counseling, and the field trips would be an incentive to follow their rigorous treatment regimens.“It’s part of a reward system and actually has a medical-social bent,” Judge Gerstein said.The reward for the Gersteins and the lawyers who volunteer their time on the Summer Fun for Kids board of directors is seeing smiles on the faces of children who’ve had a rough time in their young lives.“I know these children are our future,” Judge Gerstein said. “There are some kids who can get into horrible situations and have lots of problems. That’s also our future if we ignore our children. But if we step in and do something, these children who are our future can be happy and successful.”One of the many benefits of the program, Judge Gerstein said, is that foster kids are “mainstreamed” with children who don’t come from dysfunctional homes.“They learn as much from other children as the program themselves. They learn about attitudes, about kids who did not grow up in foster care.”The original Summer Fun for Kids gave at-risk and special needs children an opportunity to attend camp or field trips throughout Miami-Dade County, including 110 kids who attended camp at the Museum of Science, the Miami Seaquarium, Danny Berry Baseball Camp, and the City of South Miami Parks and Recreation Department. In addition, 30 children with special needs went on field trips to more than 20 locations twice a week.This summer, about 70 children attended the City of South Miami’s camp, 25 children to the YMCA and Trinity Church Camp, and 30 to 40 special needs children will go on field trips twice a week to about 20 different locations. (Some of these field trips will take place during Christmas and spring breaks, too.)Counting the happy faces on kids having fun this summer, Judge Gerstein knows first-hand: “Each one of us can make a huge difference in a child’s life.” For more information about Summer Fun for Kids, write 2900 Middle St., Suite 700, Miami, FL 33133, call 305-442-2815, or email sumfunforkids@aol.com. Lawyers go to bat for kids Two programs strive to let kids be kids Lawyers go to bat for kids:last_img read more


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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 26-year-old Kings Park man was killed when his motorcycle collided with another vehicle in Commack and the other driver was charged with driving without a license over the weekend.Suffolk County police said Christopher Colella was riding a Suzuki GSX-R600 southbound on Indian Head Road when his vehicle struck a northbound Chevrolet Venture that was making a left turn onto Somers Lane at 6:50 a.m. Saturday.The victim was pronounced dead at scene. The driver, 57-year-old Marino Guillen of Brentwood, was treated for minor injuries at Saint Catherine of Sienna Medical Center in Smithtown.Guillen was charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. Fourth Squad detectives impounded the vehicles and are continuing the investigation.last_img read more


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first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionCongress wants to create jobs by cutting taxes. But who should get the biggest cuts?Republicans prefer to stimulate the supply side (investors and corporations), while Democrats favor directing most of the cuts to the demand side (consumers). I suggest that we can choose between these options by examining the current state of the economy.Supply side: The stock market is booming, and investors are buying equities at unusually high price/earnings ratios, which suggests there is lots of hot money out there chasing too few opportunities. Furthermore, corporations are sitting on large piles of cash. So, it would seem that the supply side is not hurting for money.Demand side: It’s reported that consumers have accumulated historically large debts, in credit cards and second mortgages, to maintain their lifestyles. This suggests a lack of resources on the demand side. If consumers were given large tax cuts, they would spend the money rapidly, increasing demand for products and services and providing an impetus for businesses to grow. So, why are Republicans focused on the supply side, as in the Reagan and “W” Bush administrations? Probably because investors and corporations are their biggest donors.Bruce PomeroyDuanesburgMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusLocal movie theater operators react to green lightEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more


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first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Announces New Funding to Get Rural Students Involved in Manufacturing and Robotics This Summer Economy,  Education,  Innovation,  Workforce Development Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced the approval of new funding for Bridge Builders Community Foundations to get students in rural areas of Northwest Pennsylvania involved in educational summer workshops focused around manufacturing and to increase student interest in robotics. The grant will come from Governor Wolf’s Manufacturing PA initiative.“When we get rural students involved in STEM and manufacturing, we’re not just promoting opportunities for their future careers – we’re helping Northwest Pennsylvania’s entire advanced manufacturing and robotics sector,” said Governor Wolf. “We will remain committed to supporting programs like this that help reduce the skills gap and strengthen the commonwealth’s workforce.”The $188,300 grant will support Bridge Builders’ Pennsylvania Rural Robotics Initiative. This program collaborates with local manufacturers to offer “school to work” summer workshops for students to meet the manufacturers, explore mentorship opportunities, and learn essential skills that will enable the students to land family-sustaining manufacturing jobs after graduation. Manufacturing partners include Specialty Fabrication and Powder Coating, Komatsu Mining, Miller Fabrication Solutions, and Kronospan. Additionally, the funding will enable rural schools to start their own teams to compete in the annual VEX Competition, the largest middle and high school STEM robotics program in the world. In the VEX Competition, teams of students design robots to complete complex challenges faster than opposing teams.“We’re grateful to the Wolf Administration for this investment into NWPA that will create opportunities for its students immediately,” said Jill Foys, executive director of the Northwest Commission and steering committee member of the Pennsylvania Rural Robotics Initiative. “The summer camp will allow students to be taught by VEX Trainers and be engaged with our regional industry partners as well as those from workforce and economic development. They create a platform for students to develop skills that manufacturers say are important to them when selecting new hires including communication, problem solving, conflict resolution, critical thinking and initiation of ideas.”The Pennsylvania Manufacturing Training-to-Career grant is designed to provide funding for training programs to help unemployed and underemployed individuals, as well as those with barriers, to gain the skills they need to gain employment in the manufacturing sector. Eligible applicants include technical and trade schools, universities, and nonprofit organizations that develop new and innovative training programs and partner with two or more manufacturers.The Training-to-Career grant is part of Governor Wolf’s Manufacturing PA initiative that was launched in October 2017. This initiative ensures that training leads not simply to any job, but to careers that provide higher pay and opportunities for advancement. Working with DCED’s strategic partners, including Industrial Resource Centers (IRCs), Pennsylvania’s colleges, universities, technical schools, and non-profit organizations, this initiative fosters collaboration and partnerships to accelerate technology advancement, encourage innovation and commercialization, and build a 21st century workforce.In the 2019-2020 Executive Budget, Governor Wolf proposed the new Statewide Workforce, Education, and Accountability Program (SWEAP) to provide workforce development opportunities for Pennsylvanians from birth to retirement. SWEAP will expand access to early childhood education, increase investments in schools and educators, and further partner with the private sector to build on the PAsmart initiative. Through SWEAP and PAsmart, the governor is calling for an additional $4 million to help Pennsylvania manufacturers train workers and $6 million to expand career and technical education for adults.For more information about the Wolf Administration’s commitment to manufacturing, visit the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) website or follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and YouTube.center_img May 28, 2019last_img read more


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first_imgSeaBird doubles revenues, cuts loss Also on Thursday, SeaBird reported revenues of $5.4 million for the third quarter 2018, compared to $2.9 million in 2Q 2018 and $2.7 million in 3Q 2017. The company reduced its third quarter net loss to $4.6 million from a $26 million loss in the same period last year.SeaBird said that the reactivation of the Harrier Explorer and the beginning of two ocean bottom surveys (OBN) and two 2D surveys led to 55% vessel utilization in 3Q 2018, compared to 22% in 2Q 2018 and 22% in 3Q 2017.According to the company, the improved oil & gas sentiment seen earlier in the year continued in quarter three. Tendering activity was significantly up from previous periods. Moreover, new tenders were relatively evenly balanced between source contracts and streamer surveys. SeaBird expects the increased tender volume to continue for the rest of the year. Current tender discussions are still in the planning phase and relate primarily to potential contracts starting in 1H 2019.Most contracts year to date have been related to OBN surveys largely driven by the oil & gas companies focus on increased oil recovery on producing fields. The OBN market is thus experiencing strong growth with tenders coming from all regions. A high proportion of the OBN tenders is resulting in source vessel contract awards.“We now also see an increased number of exploration related 2D and 3D streamer survey tenders. However, prefunding of planned 2D and 3D surveys is still lagging,” the company said.The company had three active vessels during the quarter and one vessel warm stacked. Looking ahead, SeaBird expects to maintain the same three vessels in operation for the remainder of the year and expects utilization for 4Q to remain generally in line with 3Q.Offshore Energy Today Staff Harrier Explorer; Source: SeaBirdMarine acquisition provider SeaBird Exploration has received another contract extension for one of its seismic vessels amid an increasing tendering activity, which more than doubled its vessel utilization in the third quarter of the year.SeaBird said on Thursday it has received a second 30-day extension for the Osprey Explorer vessel, following its previous 30-day extension announced in October.The vessel is currently working on an OBN survey in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico that was announced on June 25, 2018 and started in late August.This latest extension is in accordance with the contract and brings the firm period of the contract to a total of 120 days.In addition, the company has started a multi-client 2D survey with a duration of approximately two weeks in North-West Europe, which is to be acquired in November.The multi-client survey is pre-funded and approximately cash neutral. The company is using the Harrier Explorer for the survey.last_img read more