Category: pfhqmqby

Category: pfhqmqby

first_imgMichael Pollan suspects that his seven-word manifesto on diet — “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” — may go with him to the grave.“I need to come up with another phrase, or that one will be on my headstone,” he jokes.Perhaps the journalist, activist, and author will find inspiration for future pronouncements when he begins teaching in the Creative Writing Program in September as the Lewis K. Chan Arts Lecturer. Blending science, the environment, and culture, Pollan has written five New York Times best-sellers, including “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals” and, most recently, “Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation.” He is the Knight Professor of Science and Environmental Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley, and the recipient of numerous honors, including the James Beard Award. GAZETTE: What will you be teaching in your first semester at Harvard?POLLAN: “Following the Food Chain” is a hybrid of a writing workshop and a background course. There will be enough reading assigned to ground someone who wants to write about food and agriculture, and to understand how our agriculture and diet are part of a system. There are important links between what we grow and government policy, public health, and the state of the environment. The course will help students connect all the dots. This has implications not only for our understanding, but for good storytelling, since the connecting of dots makes for a good narrative technique.For part of the class, we’ll be reading and discussing books on agriculture, nutrition, the food industry, and the American landscape, but the other part of the class is a writing workshop where students will write a series of articles for possible publication. These will be personal pieces, such as the role of food or food practices in one’s life or culture, to op-ed pieces or reported works of journalism. In my experience at Berkeley, I primarily teach graduate students, but I’ve always included a few undergrads to keep things lively. I’m looking forward to the diversity in the student body here. This is not a course limited to students in the humanities. I’m hoping for some science and public health students as well. Food is interdisciplinary by nature, and I’ll definitely want to reflect that in my roster.I’ll also be teaching a writing workshop on the personal essay, “The I’s Have It.” The genre is a lot trickier than people realize. Much of what we read online is in the first person, but it’s usually a generic, undistinguished first person. How do you create a voice on the page that is distinctly yours? We will be reading and writing exemplary essays and unlearning the four-paragraph essay form kids learn in high school. We’ll explore the tradition all the way from Montaigne to David Foster Wallace, Leslie Jamison, and Teju Cole. The idea is to deploy the first person not simply as a means of self-exposure or confession but as a narrative and journalistic tool. There are ways you can use yourself as a character that can be revealing and compelling. I write in the first person all the time, but I don’t really reveal that much about myself — that’s not the point. We all have a multitude of first persons and you choose the one that unlocks this particular story. Depending on the story, I’ve written as an eater, a gardener, a son, a Jew, a Californian. It’s interesting finding which of the several hats you own are particularly right for whatever it is you’re trying to write.GAZETTE: When you were here two years ago researching psychedelics as a Radcliffe fellow, you said your goal was to lay low and do less in the way of public events. Now, as faculty, what’s your plan?POLLAN: I don’t really have one. The heavy lifting on the book is done, so I feel free and light enough to focus on my teaching, which is my goal for the semester. I’m sure I’ll get involved in other activities on campus. I’m not sure what forms that will take yet.The working title of the book is “How to Change Your Mind.” There’s a renaissance of research going on in psychedelics, to explore what these substances can teach us about the mind and consciousness, and to see what therapeutic applications they may have. I researched and wrote several chapters when I was at Radcliffe. Part of the history takes place at Harvard. Not only Timothy Leary; the pioneering ethnobotanist Richard Evans Schultes also plays an important role in the history. Like all my work, this book layers several different narratives and perspectives. It’s a weave of social history, science writing, case studies, and memoir.GAZETTE: How will your eating habits shift living in New England?POLLAN: I spent the year in Cambridge looking for something really good to eat. I lived on the East Coast before I started teaching at Berkeley so I know what to expect and what not to expect. I vividly remember my first farmers’ market in Berkeley, realizing just how good a peach could be. It was an order of flavor and quality that was completely new to me. It’s harder to find that kind of life-altering produce here. The farmers market fizzles out in November. I’m not coming to Cambridge to eat. But I did find some great restaurants. I love Sofra [in Belmont], and in the fall the apples are wonderful — better than California’s.GAZETTE: How would you characterize the state of food today? Do you feel like you’re moving the needle?POLLAN: There’s no question the needle is moving, but I don’t take credit. Journalists might accelerate social or economics trends but they seldom create them. People give me credit, yet when I published “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” in 2006, there was already a lot going on — Eric Schlosser’s “Fast-Food Nation,” Marion Nestle’s “Food Politics” were both published in 2002 when I was just starting to write about the food system. The whole time I was writing that book I felt like I was actually late. Would the changes we’re seeing in the food system have happened without me? Absolutely. There was something in the air already. A publishing mentor of mine once said, “You want to be a short-term visionary.” Because if you see too far ahead, no one will know what you’re talking about. I don’t have that problem. As journalists, we’re good at picking up faint breezes of change before others notice them, but they’re already moving. We’re not making them happen.This interview was edited for clarity and length.last_img read more


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first_imgAs a graduate embarking on my career, I feel it’s important for me to share my experiences, thoughts and feelings on what it’s like to enter the workplace as a millennial.We are living in a time where there is so much pressure to thrive and show the best version of ourselves – especially when it comes to our careers. Social media broadcasts the ins and outs of people’s lives, mostly highlighting their successes but not often their failures. This can put a tremendous weight on young people when applying for their first full time job. I remember this time last year feeling really disheartened because I hadn’t secured myself a graduate scheme for September. It was difficult to see daily Instagram posts from other students who had. It was a confusing time because I felt this insane pressure to commit myself to a specific career path; though, I didn’t know what I wanted for dinner that night, let alone what I wanted to do for the rest of my life.Fast forward 1 year and thankfully those feelings are nowhere to be seen. I’m writing this blog in the hope that it resonates with future graduates who are in that difficult limbo part of their lives, wondering “what am I going to do for the rest of my life?” or “how do I get there?”. We’ve all been there and there’s no need to stress.My personal transition from university to work lifeTransitioning from being at university and living the student life to becoming a full-time employee is not easy, at least it wasn’t for me. Stepping into the big wide world was something that I found very daunting and if I’m being perfectly honest, I struggled at first. I felt like a little fish in a very big pond. University provided me with some of the best years of my life and leaving it all behind is not something you can fully prepare yourself for. For me personally, it was a very bittersweet feeling to leave behind such an important chapter in my life to make room for the new one. After speaking with friends in a similar position, it was a sigh of relief to find out that I wasn’t alone in this feeling. They also felt slightly lost and apprehensive when starting their first job after graduating. I’m not sure why I felt like this, because I always knew that after university I would go out and find a job, but when reality hit that I’ll likely be working until I’m at least 70, I felt dejected.Having said that, this transition was also exciting and liberating. For the first time in my life, I felt like I could do whatever I wanted, and I loved having this new-found freedom. I felt accomplished and proud to have secured myself a job at such a well-known and successful company as Dell Technologies. On top of this, I was more than ready to not be a student anymore and earn myself some decent money!One thing I found helpful when coping with this big life change was taking the graduate scheme role rather than the standard ISR role. It has provided me with the additional support that I didn’t know I needed or wanted, and also helped me form bonds and friendships with people I wouldn’t have otherwise met.The reason I am being so honest and not sugar coating my experience is that it’s important for young professionals to know that it’s okay to not have everything figured out by the time you graduate. If you feel nervous or a bit out of place during the first few weeks at a job, that’s okey, it’s normal. Give yourself time to adapt and settle in.My first few months at Dell TechnologiesMy first week at Dell Technologies was a whirlwind. I attended the FRS Cascade on my second day, which felt crazy, but a good kind of crazy. It was a great event to attend so early on as I had the chance to meet lots of new people. It was my first opportunity to properly network with other professionals, and not surprisingly I got a bit trigger happy with the connect button on LinkedIn!The following Sunday, I flew to Dublin to begin my 4 weeks of graduate training. I remember sitting in my hotel room slightly overwhelmed, but feeling content at how lucky I had been already.The month in Dublin flew by and was made more fun by the fantastic group of people I got to spend it with. Our training group was made up of graduates from all over. We had representatives from the UK, Ireland, Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Slovakia. From the very start, I could see that Dell Technologies was a workplace full of diversity and culture, something that I found very appealing. Returning to Wales after training was slightly deflating. Even though I was more than ready to be back in my own bed and raring to properly start my job, I was gutted to leave behind new friends.Looking back, I think I found my feet very quickly. I truly believe this was a result of having my lifelong friend by my side from the day one. Having a familiar face in the office was comforting. She has always has been a solid support system for me, in and out of work. I was also given a fantastic mentor/buddy who has helped me learn and understand the role and company. To this day he is still willing to answer all my questions, and believe me when I say, I ask a lot of questions.There was one thing that I struggled with during my first few months at Dell Technologies and this was the tiredness. No one warned me quite how tiring it was, which seems silly when my job entails sitting at a desk all day. As a very sociable and extroverted person, I really pushed myself to fill my weekends with plans to see friends, family and my boyfriend. But in hindsight, I think I overloaded myself and around Christmas time I crashed and burned. I learned from this and I now make sure that I give myself enough down time to relax and recuperate instead of packing in plans every spare minute I have out of work.8 months in It’s safe to say I feel a lot calmer and settled now. I’m not exaggerating when I say Dell Technologies is one big family that makes you feel welcome the moment you step through the door. The relationships I have built with my fellow graduates, colleagues and customers has solidified that applying for a job at Dell Technologies was the right decision for me.I work in a small office in Newport, South Wales. There are only 12 of us based there. We are all a similar age and get on like a house on fire – which is a huge relief considering we spend 37 hours a week together. We socialize outside of work and all support each other as if we have been friends of years. I don’t think you come across a dynamic like the one in my office very often and I’m grateful that I can be a part of it. I’m thankful for my colleagues because they’re a big reason why the worries and fears I first had have completely subsided and why I am so happy at Dell Technologies. The culture we created in our little office is a pleasure to be in. The only downfall being in such a small team is the lack of ERG’s. I would love to get involved with initiatives such as Gen Next, Women in Action and Planet, but unfortunately, we don’t have the facilities or resources here.What do we look for in an employer?What an employer must bring to the table is constantly changing. What would draw my fellow graduates and me into taking a job now, will be very different to the graduates in a mere 5 years. After speaking with other graduates and old university friends, I have found 6 key things that would entice us millennials to apply for a job.FlexibilityNow I can’t talk for all my peers, but I live by the motto; “work to live rather than live to work”. A work-life balance is very important to me and it’s an idea that has been reciprocated by those in management roles within Dell Technologies. The typical 9-5 office constrained job is slowly disappearing as the workforce transforms to suit the needs of its employees. This change is fundamentally being driven by millennials. We desire the ability and resources to excel at our job from any location, stemming from the need to create a healthier work-life balance.I recently read an article on LinkedIn that highlighted that many workplaces are changing by giving their employees more time off to enjoy life. This extra time off means that they are generally happier, resulting in a positive effect on their commitment, motivation and performance at work. It’s a win-win in my opinion.DiversityAs previously mentioned, a big appeal for myself and many of my peers is a diverse workforce. Living in such a multi-cultural and diverse country as the UK, seeing this reflected in the workforce and culture of a company is so important. This is something I’m happy to say that Dell Technologies celebrates. I’ve met people from all walks of life and experienced so many ways of living. When attending the first F2F event in Lodz, Poland, I was able to meet and socialize with other graduates from 20+ different countries, every one unique in their own way. It was truly humbling to be among such diversity.I would expect diversity within a company and to be honest if it was something they didn’t have it would deter me from applying.Modern Technology and FacilitiesHaving grown up surrounded by technology, I would be much more drawn towards a job that offers modern facilities and technologies to support my work. I was more inclined to apply for universities which had the best resources and facilities and I kept this mindset when applying for post graduate jobs. Those who have experienced their entire lives through smartphones and similar technologies are entering the workforce in the near future—the demand for employers to have modern technologies is only going to increase.OpportunityWhen interviewing for a job, one of the first questions I ask is in regard to the opportunity to progress through the company. If there isn’t any, it would be a major factor in deciding if the job is right for me. While this is something that has applied to all generations, I believe it’s felt much more keenly by millennials. Moving into such an uncertain world and economy and possibly saddled with a large amount of debt, it’s important to know that the company you are putting your time and hard work into cares about you and will encourage you to develop your skills.TravelOne of my favorite things about working for Dell Technologies is the opportunity to travel. Since September I have visited Dublin, Lodz and Krakow and will be going to Montpellier next month. I always knew that I wanted to see the world and if I could do so when I was working, then I would take every opportunity to do so.Whenever I meet with friends, they constantly tell how lucky I am to be able to travel with my job and how they wish they could do the same. I do believe that this is more of a luxury than a necessity, but the idea of travelling and seeing different countries and cultures is an attractive offering from an employer.Being eco-friendlyWe are amidst a climate change crisis and our planet is at breaking point—it’s important for large corporations to do all they can to be sustainable and eco-friendly. I would always favor a company who shows care and concern for the effects their business has on the environment and acts against it. Dell Technologies’s commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility was one of the main factors in why I decided to apply.Advice I would give to future gradsIf I could go back to my newly graduated self and give her some advice it would be the following; be open minded, change isn’t always a bad thing and these changes will let you meet the most fantastic people and give you experiences you’ll treasure for life. Take risks. Pushing yourself out of your comfort zone will only help you grow and realize your true potential. It might be scary at first, but it’s worth it in the end. Don’t let a lack of knowledge about something put you off. You will learn, and you will feel so proud and accomplished for doing so. You’re going to be super tired for a while, so stop watching Netflix and go to sleep before 11pm. Take every opportunity thrown your way, it will help build your confidence. Lastly, apply to Dell Technologies – you most certainly won’t regret it.last_img read more


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first_imgEveryone should get Rad.Those of you born in the ‘80s probably remember the bitchin’ BMX movie RAD, which followed Cru Jones (awesome name) in his attempt to race Helltrack (awesomer name). It was one of those undeniably bad movies that helped define my childhood, and every time I see a hipster wearing an ironic T-shirt that says “Rad,” I’m immediately transported back to a dusty, homemade BMX track built quickly in the vacant lot of my best friend’s neighborhood. It was no Helltrack, but I was no Cru Jones either.Now there’s a beer that’s poised to transport me back to those dirt riding, day-glo wearing days of innocence—Sixpoint Brewery (out of Brooklyn) has released RAD, an ale mixed with a blend of fruit juices. Yep, beer and juice. They’re calling it a “Cycliquid,” (as in Cycle-Liquid). It sounds crazy, but apparently there’s some history to this sort of drink. Back in Germany in the ‘20s, an industrious bar owner started mixing beer with lemon soda and serving it to thirsty cyclists on tour. The cyclists loved it—the drink quenched their thirst without knocking them on their ass.A revived interest in sessionable beers has brought the style back.  Leinenkugel Brewery makes a Summer Shandy (beer and lemonade) and Coors is doing something similar with their new Summer Brew, which takes your standard Coors Light and blends in citrus juice.Personally, I’d like to see more of this beer, particularly from local breweries that have big cycling connections (I’m looking at you Devils Backbone and Pisgah). In the meantime, you can get Rad all on your own. Take your favorite light beer (any lager or pilsner will do) and mix in some lemonade. Try a three parts beer to two parts lemonade ratio.It’s like drinking Juicy Fruit gum with a bit of alcohol in it. Everyone get Rad.last_img read more


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first_imgView of Booking.com’s new categorization system (red ellipse) “Search by star rating is the most used filter on Booking.com“, Explained Olivier Grémillon, Vice President of Global Segments. “Previously, when someone searched on Booking.com for three, four or five star accommodation units, holiday homes would not be displayed. Now, when they search using the same filter, they are displayed and everyone benefits from it.” Jeff Hurst, chief salesman at Expedition-owned Vrbo, finds it difficult to be precise when determining stars. “Personally, I often knew how to stay in a four-star hotel without my experience being up to standard.” Source / photo: Skift; Booking.com The new grading system was first unveiled during a presentation at this week’s conference of the Holiday Accommodation Management Association in New Orleans, USA. But several property managers disagree with the ratings given by Booking.com to their facilities. For example, a few said they would have preferred the agency to give them a lower grade. They would rather keep the user’s expectations a bit lower because they could pleasantly surprise the guest and thus are more likely to leave a review with a better rating. Some feel that user reviews have a greater impact on potential guests. Booking.com’s move is quite bold because the agency arbitrarily determines ratings. Holiday homes and apartments are no longer aligned with hotels, which have long been categorized by government organizations and third parties according to the number of stars. The number of stars is separate, ie there is no correlation with the average accommodation result determined by user reviews. Olivier Grémillon, whose job involves overseeing rental units within Booking.com, said guests on average give better ratings to holiday homes or apartments than hotels. This new system of the company will provide an additional reference point that will help users in comparing real estate, Grémillon believes. Others have complained that this process will confuse many users because, for example, Airbnb displays user review ratings in asterisk form. Booking.com rates real estate including about 400 different factors. For example, an apartment that has an espresso machine is more likely to get a fifth star more easily. Some experts supported Booking.com’s move. “I find it important not only to have user review ratings, but also official categorizations to better determine user expectations. For example, there may be a two-star accommodation that has impeccable user ratings, but the mere fact that the property has only two stars would certainly help put the review rating in a different context.”, Said Steve Milo, founder and CEO of Vtrips. Earlier this month, Booking.com began applying star ratings to its short-term rental offerings. An online travel agency ranks properties from one to five stars – where a five-star rating indicates the most attractive accommodation, reports Shift. The company strives to adjust the calculations to make them as relevant as possible. For example, an accommodation facility in cold Copenhagen will not have a worse rating due to the lack of air conditioning, unlike some holiday homes in the tropics.last_img read more


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first_imgExperts from various fields are dissatisfied with the government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, urging it to prioritize health care in tackling the crisis, a recent survey reveals.Pollster Indikator Politik Indonesia conducted the survey in July involving 304 opinion leaders in 20 cities, including academicians, business people, journalists and NGO activists.Among them are Nadhlatul Ulama’s (NU) Mustofa “Gus Mus” Bisri, former Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) chairman Busyro Muqoddas and Persahabatan Hospital pulmonologist Erlina Burhan. The reasons behind the government’s inefficient response, they said, were ineffective rapid antibody tests, insufficient funds to help those affected, poor identification of affected patients, slow distribution of aid, non-integrated regulations, inconsistency at implementing regulations and poor coordination among different sectors.However, the level of trust toward President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and Health Minister Terawan Agus Putranto was not much different between the public and the surveyed opinion leaders.The majority of the public (60.9 percent) and opinion leaders (57.6 percent) trusted Jokowi, according to the survey. Terawan, meanwhile, had the trust of 37.2 percent of surveyed opinion leaders and 38.9 percent of the public.The survey also revealed that the majority of expert respondents (71.1 percent) believed health care should be the government’s number one priority in solving the crisis rather than the economy.“This is in contrast with the measures taken by the government lately, which seem to focus on economic recovery, with 47.9 percent of the public supporting the approach,” Burhanuddin said.Surabaya-based Airlangga University political expert Kacung Marijan said the disparity between these opinions resulted from the different impacts felt by the public and the opinion leaders, who were part of the elite.“Most of the elite have not been not hit [economically] by the pandemic, unlike the public. After three months of the outbreak, the public has lost its patience.”He added, however, that the elite group urged the government to prioritize health care in order to revive the economy in the long term. Indikator executive director Burhanuddin Muhtadi emphasized the importance of the survey, saying that experts tended to be more critical of the government’s efforts as they have better knowledge and understanding of relevant details that the general public may not be aware of.Released on Thursday, the survey revealed that 36.8 percent of respondents approved of how the government is dealing with the pandemic — less than 51.5 percent of members of the public surveyed in May.A majority of respondents, or 64.4 percent, were of the opinion that COVID-19 transmission in Indonesia was not under control.Read also: Public trust in Jokowi’s COVID-19 response declines, survey findscenter_img Topics :last_img read more


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first_img Metro Sport ReporterFriday 14 Aug 2020 3:48 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link5.3kShares Comment ‘The Ivory Coast winger has blown hot and cold so far, which is not a great quality in Arteta’s book.‘Undoubtedly talented, Pepe has got to kick on if he’s going to survive because, in the short term at least, Willian can provide great know-how and quality on that right side.’After Arsenal confirmed a deal for Willian, manager Mikel Arteta said: ‘I believe he’s a player that can really make a difference for us.‘We had a clear intention to strengthen in the attacking midfielder and the winger positions.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Arsenal plot ‘active’ summer transfer strategy after signing WillianMORE: Arsenal confirm Willian’s shirt number after signing winger on free transfer Arsenal have signed former Chelsea winger Willian on a three-year deal (Picture: Getty)Alan Smith has warned Arsenal record signing Nicolas Pepe he must ‘kick on to survive’ at the club after Mikel Arteta signed former Chelsea winger Willian.The Gunners have signed Brazil international Willian on a three-year deal following his departure from Stamford Bridge. He will wear the No.12 shirt for Arsenal.Willian made more than 300 appearances for Arsenal’s London rivals Chelsea and helped the Blues win two Premier League titles and the Europa League.Smith remains unsure whether Willian will prove to be a success at Arsenal but says his arrival has piled the pressure on Ivory Coast star Pepe.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTPepe joined the Gunners last summer for a club-record fee of £72million and endured a mixed first season in north London.Discussing Arsenal’s move for Willian, former Gunners striker Smith told Sky Sports: ‘It is time to move the project forward by adding quality in certain positions, which is not easy at all when money is tight.‘Willian’s free transfer from Chelsea looks like the first step, which surprised me at first given the Brazilian’s age. Alan Smith fires warning to Arsenal star Nicolas Pepe after Mikel Arteta signs former Chelsea winger Willian Alan Smith has warned Nicolas Pepe he has to ‘kick on to survive’ (Picture: Getty)‘Just turned 32 with lots of miles on the clock, Stamford Bridge has surely seen his best days.‘So was this just a convenient move because he has the right agent? Something foisted upon Arteta by Raul Sanllehi, the head of football?‘Or does Arteta see something in Willian that can improve the team straight away?‘One thing is for sure, as a right-sided attacker, his arrival asks immediate questions of Nicolas Pepe, signed at exorbitant cost this time last year. Advertisement Advertisement 🆕 New club. New colours. New beginnings.👋 Welcome to The Arsenal, @WillianBorges88! 🔴 pic.twitter.com/B7Tl01BXLe— Arsenal (@Arsenal) August 14, 2020last_img read more


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first_imgThe Danish krone is unlikely to become decoupled from the euro in the way the Swiss franc recently parted company from the pan-European currency despite today’s expected decision by the European Central Bank (ECB) to initiate a wide-scale quantitative easing (QE) programme, according to Danish pension funds.However, one suggested the Danish currency may end up fluctuating more widely against the euro than is now the case.Michael Kjærbye-Thygesen, senior portfolio manager of fixed income at Sampension, said he believed the Danish krone’s euro peg would hold.“It has been in place since 1982, and the Danish central bank will do all in its power to maintain the peg,” he said. This would mean interventions and possibly further interest rate cuts, he said, adding that Danish rates were still attractive compared with core euro rates.Kjærbye-Thygesen said he believed the market was now pricing in purchases by ECB of government bonds of the order of €500bln, as the central bank aimed to bring its balance sheet up by around €1trn.“We expect the ECB to meet expectations with an announcement of €500bn balance sheet expansion from the purchases but will keep the door open for further purchases, should that be required,” he told IPE.Sampension holds a large part of its bond portfolio in euro government bonds, as well as Danish government bonds, Kjærbye-Thygesen said, adding that the pension fund expected these holdings to benefit from today’s announcement. “We are not moving bond risk to the US, as there is a clear decoupling between the euro area and the US, both on the macro economy and the reaction of central banks,” he said.Sampension takes the view that the US Fed will hike rates around the middle of this year.Similarly, pensions provider SEB Pension sees no chance at all that the Danish currency will become uncoupled from the euro.Jorn Styczen, CIO at SEB Pension in Denmark, said: “There is zero probability that Denmark is going to break the link with the euro.”He said he thought there was general misunderstanding on the Danish krone and the position of the Danish central bank (Danmarks Nationalbank). “The situation of the Danish central bank does not resemble the Swiss National Bank (SNB) at all,” Styczen said, referring to the SNB’s decision earlier this month to cut the peg between the Swiss franc and the euro.While the SNB’s peg to the euro was a relatively recent policy action, Styczen said the Danish krone had been pegged to the euro for many years. “It is the regime Danish investors are working with,” he said. “The euro is incorporated in all the legislation we have.”If the Danish krone were to go the way of the Swiss franc, it would be a major change to the structure of the Danish economy, he said.“Based on this, we are not changing our euro-hedging strategy,” he said.SEB Pension’s assets had been positioned in anticipation of euro-wide QE for some time, he said, with the overall portfolio overweight in equities, long in US-dollar holdings and long in bonds.“In general, we have been positioned for the ECB to act for many months,” Styczen said.Elsewhere, Lars Lyhne, head of asset allocation at labour-market scheme PenSam, pointed out that, technically at least, there was a lot of flexibility in the Danish krone’s link to the euro.“We tend to forget the krone is allowed to move 15% without leaving the peg,” he said.“It was conceived in the days of the ERM (exchange-rate mechanism), where currency movements were more common at this level,” he said.That said, the Danish central bank would be defending the plus or minus 2.25% band against the euro, he said.“There is a lot of political will to maintain this peg, and the Danish perspective is very different from the Swiss one,” Lyhne said.If the Danish krone were to fluctuate more widely against the euro, Lyhne said PenSam’s investments would suffer no direct impact because they were currency hedged.“But there would be an indirect impact, as a 15% swing would hurt the Danish equity market, so there would be second-round effects on us,” he said.“We are overweight equities compared with our benchmark, and one of the reasons for that is our expectations of more expansionary monetary policy.”Separately, KLP Kapitalforvaltning, the asset management arm of Norwegian public sector pension fund KLP, said it was making no special preparations for the possible consequences of QE.Lars Mouland, portfolio manager at the division, said the fund believed market expectations of an ECB announcement would be met.“We expect some volatility in the next couple of days, but then things will continue,” he said.“The ECB will buy enough to meet the €3trn balance sheet within a couple of years.”He predicted national central banks would buy the majority of that amount.last_img read more


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first_img 58 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring! St. Mary’s Primary School Students at semi-final round of the contest held on 5th May, 2011.The St Mary’s Primary School has emerged winners in the finals of the National Primary Schools Mathematics Contest which got underway here today.Six primary schools competed for the championship trophy and other cash prizes.Coordinator of the National Primary Schools Mathematics Contest Clement Vital gives the details: Dominica Vibes News Tweetcenter_img Share Share EducationLocalNewsPrimary SMP wins National Primary Schools Maths contest by: – May 18, 2011last_img


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first_img The Red Devils signed the former Leicester defender for a record fee of £80million after been on their wishlist since 2018 According to Parker, the England international has failed to solve the club’s defensive problems. Parker, himself a defender during his playing days, believes Maguire has ‘done okay’ at Man United but thinks the club should not have spent the money they did on him.Advertisement Loading… “He has done okay,” Parker told https://bonuscodebets.co.uk. “He has not stood out for me and for the money that United paid for him, he has not earned that. “You look at someone like Virgil van Dijk, who has absolutely been value for money, and you would go as far to say that he has exceeded that. “I don’t think they needed to spend that money on Maguire. They got pressured into getting him from the previous manger [Jose Mourinho] when they did not need to spend that type of money.” read also: Man Utd no longer a football club, says Parker Parker also suggested that Man United were too hasty in their decision to let Chris Smalling join Roma on loan as he has excelled in his time at Italy. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Harry Maguire has failed to live up to the huge hefty price tag at Manchester United, according to ex-player Paul Parker. Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThe Best Cars Of All Time7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterMacaulay Culkin’s Own Version Of The New ‘Home Alone’7 Theories About The Death Of Our UniverseWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone8 Shows That Went From “Funny” To “Why Am I Watching This”The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MorePlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your Bodylast_img read more


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first_imgGREENSBURG, Ind. — A Greensburg woman has been arrested on multiple drug related charges.Megan Friend, 26, was arrested after a traffic stop in Greensburg.According to police, officers saw movement in the car during the stop that made them believe the occupants of the car were trying to hide something.According to police, there was also a three-year-old boy in the back seat of the vehicle.Police say Friend gave consent for officers to search the vehicle.During the search, officers found a plastic baggie in a cigarette pack that contained a white crystal like substance and a glass pipe with burnt residue.The white substance tested positive for Methamphetamine.Friend was arrested on charges of Possession of Methamphetamine, Maintaining a Common Nuisance, and Possession of Paraphernalia.last_img read more