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first_imgMore than 50 students, faculty members, and administrators gathered Wednesday night to commemorate National Coming Out Day and to memorialize the bisexual, gay, lesbian, transgender, and queer (BGLTQ) students nationwide who committed suicide in recent years following brutal harassment and discrimination.The event, organized by the group Queer Students and Allies (QSA), began at Sever Hall and concluded with a candlelight vigil on the steps of University Hall that both honored the recent progress toward equality for the BGLTQ (bisexual, gay, lesbian, transgender, and queer) community and the suffering many still face as a result of their sexuality.“On this day, the day after National Coming Out Day, we would like to celebrate our sexual and gender diversity, while simultaneously recognizing the discrimination and harassment that many BGLTQ people, and youth in particular, face,” QSA board member Sam Bakkila ’12 said. “We want to thank everyone here. Your efforts to make Harvard and the world a more welcoming place have transformed coming out from a scary process into something to celebrate.”Among the administrators who attended the event was Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds, who recalled the words of poet and essayist Audre Lorde in her comments, which urged students to continue efforts to make the BGLTQ community visible on campus.“Audre Lorde was one of the most influential people in my life,” said Hammonds, the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American Studies. “One thing she said that was very meaningful for me was ‘your silence will not protect you.’ Those words made us feel that being open and out and expressing ourselves and claiming our identity was what would make our lives better.”“Harvard today is very different from the Harvard I came to in 1985,” Hammonds continued. “I think it’s very different in important ways. We still have a way to go, but only by your voices, your activities, and your visibility will we get to where we need to be.”Harvard President Drew Faust also attended, and reminded students, staff, and faculty that the University must be a shining example of a community where all sexualities are appreciated.“Every fall, when I welcome the freshman class to Harvard, I tell them to ‘make Harvard yours.’ But when I say that, I’m always aware of the groups for whom that was not possible for so many years,” Faust said. “One of my highest aspirations as president is to ensure that all the members of this community feel that they fully belong here.”“We at Harvard must strive to build communities, here on this campus and throughout our lives, that promote inclusion and encourage participation, and we must affirm to the world our commitment to ‘making it better’ for future generations,” Faust continued. “Bi, gay, lesbian, transgendered, and queer students, staff, and faculty are an integral part of Harvard University. Let’s all work together to create a future where no one asks, ‘Do I belong here?’ because the affirmative response to the question is already completely clear.”last_img read more


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first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.As a boy growing up in Atlanta, Obasi Shaw ’17 listened exclusively to Christian rap, a little-known genre that features songs of faith and salvation with positive messages and clean lyrics.Then, about two years ago, Shaw listened to Kendrick Lamar and Chance the Rapper, mainstream rappers who have achieved popular and critical success with poignant songs about the contemporary struggles of blacks in America. And over time, Shaw has grown to admire both men’s artistry and their willingness to delve into “questions of race, religion, and black identity” — admiration that found its way into Shaw’s senior thesis.Senior English concentrators at Harvard often submit screenplays, memoirs, novels, a collection of poems or short stories for their creative writing thesis. Shaw wrote a rap album.It is the first rap album ever submitted as a senior thesis in the English Department, said Lauren Bimmler, undergraduate program administrator. It was awarded a grade of summa cum laude minus.That meant, to Shaw, recognition of rap as an art form, one as valid as poetry. Developed in the 1970s by blacks in working-class neighborhoods of New York as a response to their marginalization from society, rap is strongly rooted in the African oral tradition.“Some people don’t consider rap a high art form,” said Shaw on a recent afternoon at a coffee shop near campus. “But poetry and rap are very similar. Rhyming poems were very common in old English poetry.”Shaw has a fondness for writing and said old English literature had influenced his album. His thesis adviser, Josh Bell, Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in English, agreed.“Obasi’s album is very interesting because it uses Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’ as an intellectual overlay,” said Bell, who teaches poetry workshops at Harvard. Shaw “is telling stories in each song from different points of view, and it’s critical of American society and racial politics. But above all that, it’s a fun and interesting album.”Brimming with energy in its vivid lyrics and catchy beats, the album offers a broad sweep of the history of African-Americans’ quest for equality. The songs deal with issues ranging from slavery to police brutality, from segregation to the Black Lives Matter movement, from mass incarceration to Barack Obama. Shaw wrote the songs over the course of last year and recorded them at Quad Sound Studios. He collected beats from friends or online.The album’s title, “Liminal Minds,” plays on the phrase “criminal minds,” said Shaw. But more than anything, it refers to the in-between state of blacks in this country: free but often marginalized, free yet not equal.“Black people in America are kind of caught between freedom and slavery,” he said. “They’re free, but the effects of slavery still exist in society and in people’s subconscious. Each song is an exploration of black liminality, that state between slavery and freedom.”In the opening song, “Declaration of Independence,” Shaw sings, with a haunting beat in the background, about the incidents of police violence against black men and finds fault in the whole system.Composing like Beethoven, to the deaf, or just the hard of hearing —Complacent faces, vacant breasts, bereft of all the feeling.A nation due for inspection, this is the audit, hereinLies the fear in the eyes of our departed dearly —Cold bodies facing .22, man in blue.In the closing song, “Open Your Eyes,” Shaw strikes a more optimistic tone when he focuses on the progress gained by African-Americans with resilience, courage, and hope in their struggle for rights.Just watch the thrones, our people are knownFor making history of the impossible.From rap to White House, we unstoppable.Jumping Jim Crow to playing Oscar roles.Writing rap songs is similar to writing stories or essays, or even code, said Shaw, who has a secondary in computer science. But in rap he found his voice and the right vehicle to express his blackness. He said he still favors Lamar and Chance because they claim to be Christian, but also because they’re willing to sing about issues that are central to the African-American experience such as racism and the legacy of slavery.The idea of writing a rap thesis was serendipitous. Shaw had started rapping at a summer Bible camp in Tennessee, but didn’t take it seriously until the deadline to submit his senior thesis proposal found him without a compelling idea. His mother suggested, “Why don’t you write a rap thesis?”In preparation, Shaw listened to mainstream rap, much of which he didn’t like for its explicit lyrics, violence, and misogyny, and read about rap’s history. “I needed to learn what rap has meant to people for decades,” he said.Having his parents’ support in his intellectual endeavors is precious to Shaw. Both are Harvard graduates, and they homeschooled their son. His Christian upbringing, said Shaw, gave him his moral compass.Shaw was managing editor of the Harvard Ichthus, a journal of Christian faith produced by undergrads, and a member of the Christian group Harvard Faith and Action.After graduation, Shaw will move to Seattle for a one-year internship in software engineering. As for rap, he’ll keep it as a treasured hobby.“Rap is a genre in which I can say everything I want to say,” Shaw said. “I’ve been writing in different capacities, but I never felt that I found my art form until I started rapping.”last_img read more


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first_imgWhile most students were returning to Cambridge last weekend, a group of about 50 were gathered in Central Massachusetts, reconnecting with old friends and meeting new ones, in some cases while belting out “Let It Go” during karaoke. The pop anthem from the movie “Frozen” about surmounting tough challenges seemed a fitting choice for these first-years who’d made it through their transition to College and were looking ahead to spring semester.The Saturday karaoke session, which ran overtime due to enthusiasm, was one of the activities offered during the First-Year Retreat, held over three days at the Prindle Pond Conference Center in Charlton. The goal of the annual gathering is to help students regroup and reflect on personal identity and core values through guided sessions with older students, coupled with various options for activities, mindfulness and wellness training, and relaxation.“I didn’t expect to come to so many realizations about myself so quickly, but I did,” said Ibrahim Mammadov ’23, who passed on karaoke for an afternoon of painting with watercolors. “We’re learning a lot about optimism and positivity, and how to solve problems in a new way.”The trip was organized by the First-Year Experience Office, part of the Harvard College Dean of Students Office. The retreat, now in its fifth year, is offered on a first-come, first-served basis during Wintersession at no cost to students. Financial support for the retreat is provided by the Harvard College Dean’s Office and the Dean of Students Office.“One of the benefits of having the retreat between the fall and spring semesters is that the participants have had a full semester of experiences to draw on, and they can reconnect with what got them here and what’s special about their life journey so far,” said Madeleine Currie, resident dean of first-year students, who has overseen the retreat since it began in 2015. “There is also something powerful about taking people out of their usual physical environment, which accelerates reflection and making new connections in your own mind and more connections to one another.”For some students that social piece was key.,“If you didn’t make the most social connections because you were busy studying during the first semester, this is a great way to meet new people,” said Tuzo Mulunda ’23, who learned about the retreat through friends. “Getting out of Cambridge and coming out here to Prindle Pond has been great, and I’ve just been going into every activity with an open mind.”The schedule is loosely structured around the themes of past, present, and future. Staff directors Nina Bryce and Stacey Blondin worked with student facilitators for two months to create a curriculum that encouraged participants to think about their lives on campus and establish goals for the upcoming semester.“My main hope is that, at the end of the weekend, the participants feel a little less tightly wound in terms of the pressures of being a Harvard student,” said Bryce. “A lot of students I work with talk about imposter syndrome and worrying about optimizing every moment, so I hope they feel a little more free to do what they really want and to connect with each other. I want them to have that sense of living in alignment with what really matters to them, going into their second semester.”On Friday, shortly after arriving by bus, facilitators worked in small groups with participants to create a “River of Life,” a drawing project in which people create landmarks for important moments in their lives and discuss the effects of these moments on their lives today.Saturday’s activities included “Instant Best Friends,” modeled on a method outlined in a New York Times piece, “The 36 Questions That Lead to Love.” Students met in small groups and pairs to ask each other questions like: “If you were able to live to the age of 90 and retain either the mind or body of a 30-year-old for the last 60 years of your life, which would you want?” and “Would you like to be famous? In what way?”Before leaving on Sunday afternoon, participants developed goals for personal growth, work, education, and relationships that they hope to achieve over the next months and years.,“The retreat put me into a really great mindset to start the new semester with, and the reflective activities left me with some actionable goals that I’m bringing with me as I start class again,” said Yoel Hawa ’23. “I think it was really well organized, and I loved all the planned activities that were set up for us, but my favorites were the spontaneous ones that we just did together, like singing while hiking through the woods or playing Mafia late into the night.”Hawa and Mammadov were two of the 13 participants who turned off or surrendered their phones for the weekend as a way to fully unplug from everyday stressors and engage more meaningfully with others on the retreat.“I really wanted to be present,” said Mammadov.For the student facilitators, the retreat offered a chance to learn new skills and create new friendships with each other and with the student participants, most of whom they wouldn’t encounter on campus. Six of the 15 facilitators were former participants, and three were taking a return crack at the position.“Talking to first-years about stresses in their lives made me remember similar stresses my freshman year, and think about how these things have changed or stayed the same,” said Nish Sinha ’21, a physics concentrator and facilitator. “The retreat was filled with kindness, intentionality, and laughter, and I definitely will try to take these ideas into the second half of my junior year.”“We talk about how students develop a sense of belonging, and this is a time when the participants start to experience that in a way that perhaps they haven’t in the first semester, when everything feels so new,” said Currie. “It’s wonderful that the students have this community experience where they can be more authentically themselves.” When the trees become the teacher College Events Board expands, creating bigger sense of community on campus Boston high schoolers experience hands-on connection to climate change The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Three lies and lots of truths on campus Growing beyond Yardfest Tagging along on a student-led historical tour Relatedlast_img read more


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first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the first in a two-part series featuring two candidates vying to represent Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District. Across the country, Republicans are challenging Democratic incumbents to gain control of the U.S. House of Representatives. The race for Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District is no different. Republican candidate Jackie Walorski is running against Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly, who has held his position for the last four years. It has been highlighted in the media as one of the nation’s most contested races. Walorski told The Observer she would look to the University as a potential partner to her if she were elected. She specifically commended the University’s focus on research and said it would be an asset to the district she would serve. “The research dollars, the things that have happened in this place, not only produce a great community for us, but a great alum community around the world,” she said. Walorski previously worked as a local reporter, and she said this exposed her to various research initiatives that are now coming to life at the University. “Things that they were looking for are now a reality. So this is the paramount issue for me,” she said. Walorski said in terms of her economic platform, the country must control spending, which will especially impact recent college graduates in search for employment. She said her time serving the Indiana state legislature has prepared her to do it on a more broad level. “What we have done in these past six years is melted down our size of government, all aimed at protecting the taxpayer,” Walorski said. “That has to be done as a foundational measure at the federal government in order for [students] to have a job when they get out of here.” Walorski said she would propose the 2011 budget be frozen in order for the president to audit agencies and cut back on duplicative efforts. She said trimming bureaucracy would help the job market. “If we create a level of certainty at the federal level where they know there is not going to be mandates coming down, that the next shoe is going to drop, we will see a flexibility of the market where people are hiring,” Walorski said. In terms of recent health care reform, Walorski said one of the most popular aspects crossing party lines particularly applies to college students. “I think the issue of being able to carry kids until they are 26 is probably the most popular part of the whole program,” she said. “I have heard from Republicans and Democrats and Independents alike that because the job market is so tight they like the security of being able to carry college graduates until they are 26.” Walorski did say that despite that particular aspect of the health care bill, more steps are needed to control medical litigation and damages, otherwise known as tort reform. Walorski also said education represents an extremely important part of her political platform. She said one thing that needs to be changed is how much responsibility teachers are being charged with. “We are shoving an unbelievable burden on teachers because of the breakdown of the family [and] because of our culture changing,” Walorski said. “Teachers are responsible for, in many cases, the kids more than the parents are and they are responsible for an unbelievable amount of teaching, not just curriculum.” Walorski also said the No Child Left Behind Act has created problems in the educational system by complicating funding for schools, which is controlled by each state. She said rectifying this issue is extremely important. “The money needs to be driven into the classrooms, not the administrators,” Walorski said. Walorski also said she has taken a strong stance on the issue of abortion, which is of particular importance to the Notre Dame community, noting in the past she has worked to de-fund pro-choice institutions. “The battle that is raging, the reason that people are so angry, is because we are talking about a tax supported industry. I’ve stood up to Planned Parenthood to de-fund them,” she said. “I don’t believe we should force anyone who does not believe in it to pay for it.” On the issue of the United States’ military presence in the Middle East, Walorski said the safety of the troops and the decision making of military personnel should guide government decisions in respect to the area. “I think that one of the biggest mistakes that happens in this country is that we as adult voters have allowed this government to evolve into this thing where bureaucrats make military calls,” she said. “Military calls need to come from the generals on the ground that we trust the president to put there.” Walorski said she felt military presence in the area impacts the everyday safety of American citizens, and therefore is an issue that must be addressed in an appropriate manner. “The number one job of the president of the United States is to protect the United States of America from foreign invasion and threat of domestic assault inside,” she said. “I don’t see how you skirt that when you have generals on the ground saying we are still not able to walk away from Afghanistan.” Overall, Walorski said the progress of her campaign so far makes her confident for the results Nov. 2. She said the unique nature of her campaign has allowed her to communicate her platforms successfully. “I’m as blue collar as they come. I’m self funding, it’s a real grass-roots race,” she said. “We have done a good job of getting our message out.” Despite any political differences Walorski and Donnelly may hold, they do share a common devotion to the Fighting Irish football team. “I’m a Notre Dame fan, and very, very grateful that Kelly is here as a coach,” she said. The second part of this series will feature Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly. It will run it tomorrow’s Observer.last_img read more


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first_imgWhat makes a wage just or unjust? The Just Wage Working Group is working to spark dialogue around this question through the development of the Just Wage Tool and Framework, a Higgins Labor Studies Program initiative through the Center for Social Concerns.The web tool was released on Friday, and is currently available through the Just Wage Working Group’s website. It allows users to check boxes to determine, according to seven criteria, how just a wage is. Though this tool has only recently been developed, the Just Wage Project was initiated in 2016 by Dan Graff, director of the Higgins Labor Program and a professor in the History Department, and his colleague Clemens Sedmak, professor of social ethics in the Keough School of Global Affairs and concurrent professor at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns.“[Sedmak and] I gathered faculty and students from various disciplines on campus (management, economics, sociology, law, history, etc.) to pursue the question: What makes any given wage just or unjust?” Graff said in an email. This pursuit led to their development of the “Just Wage Framework” on which the tool is based.“We came up with a just wage framework of seven interconnected criteria that, to us, define a just wage, and we created a related online tool for stakeholders — whether professors, policymakers or practitioners — to use,” Graff said. “The criteria are as follows: a just wage affords a decent life to a worker and the worker’s household; a just wage promotes asset building; a just wage provides social security; a just wage is inclusive and non-discriminatory; a just wage is not excessive; a just wage is informed by workers’ participation in its creation; a just wage reflects performance, qualification and type of work.”The tool is not intended to calculate an exact value of what constitutes a just wage, Graff said, but rather to provide an idea of how well a wage satisfies the seven criteria of a just wage.“Importantly, once a person uses the tool, checking on a sliding scale of 1-5 the importance or satisfaction of every indicator in all the criteria, the result will show not a dollar figure or a point total, but a hexagon of seven honeycombs representing the criteria, each one shaded more gold the higher the scale that’s met,” Graff said. “There will also be suggestions for resources to learn more about any criteria that are being less met.”Senior Anna Scartz, a student assistant for the Higgins Labor Program, described the tool’s purpose in an email. “This is designed so that people can evaluate if their wage is just in accordance to their needs and Catholic Social Teaching,” Scartz said. “It will not give a numeric value, but speaks to the overall needs and human dignity of the worker. … It can start the conversation for what each party is looking for.”The tool is designed for use by both employers and employees, Graff said.“An employer or entrepreneur might measure her pay and benefits package or proposed employment policy against our tool,” he said. “A union activist or parish advocate might discover ways to measure a community’s jobs profile or ideas for building a campaign; a policymaker might consult the tool before proposing legislation.” A major goal of the tool, Graff asserted, is to raise awareness of growing income inequality.“We look around and see so many people working full time (in one, two, or even three jobs) and barely being able to make ends meet, while we also see the number of billionaires and millionaires increasing — so we wanted to contribute to a conversation that asks, ‘Why is this happening?’ as well as look for ways to promote a fairer and more equitable division of the economic pie,” Graff said.Kevin Christiano, an associate professor of sociology and a faculty affiliate of the Higgins Labor Studies Program, said in an email the tool is meant to impact many communities.“The tool is intended to reach far beyond the Notre Dame campus — to businesses, labor unions, schools, churches and numerous other institutions,” Christiano said. The Just Wage Working Group invites those interested to attend the official unveiling of the tool on Nov. 15 at 12:30 p.m. in the Geddes Hall coffeehouse.Tags: Center for Social Concerns, Higgins Labor Program, Higgins Labor Studies Program, just wage, Just Wage Tool and Framework, Just Wage Working Group, labor, Wageslast_img read more


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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police are asking for the public’s help in finding the hit-and-run driver that struck twin 54-year-old sisters in Great Neck and fled without stopping last week.The victims were walking on the north side of Arrandale Road when they were hit by a westbound vehicle at 6:20 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, police announced four days later.The victims were taken to a local hospital, where one was treated for non-life threatening injuries and the other is listed in critical condition with head trauma and internal injuries.Third Squad detectives ask anyone with information on this case to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS. All callers will remain anonymous.last_img


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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The Democrat-led New York State Assembly elected Tuesday a New York City lawmaker as their first new speaker to replace Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan), who resigned after being arrested on federal corruption charges.Aside from being the chamber’s first new leader in 21 years, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie (D-Bronx) is the first African American to hold the top post. His ascension comes amid renewed calls for ethics reform in the scandal-plagued state legislature. One day earlier, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he wouldn’t sign the state budget unless ethics reform is passed first—effectively threatening a government shutdown.“This change in leadership will bring about much-needed reform,” Heastie told the Assembly in his acceptance speech immediately after the vote. “The actions of a few have given calls for cynicism….We will change the cynicism into trust once again.”In his opening remarks, Heastie said the reforms must include increasing transparency on how public funds are spent, new rules on disclosing legislators’ outside income and giving lawmakers their first raise in 16 years so they don’t need to rely as much on outside income.Cuomo detailed his proposals during a speech Monday at the New York University School of Law. He called for legislators to fully explain the source of outside income, stripping pensions from lawmakers convicted of crimes, ending the practice of using campaign funds to pay personal expenses and tightening campaign finance rules.“The legislature will not want to pass new ethics laws,” Cuomo said. “Legislators will say that this is an intrusion into their private business and they will be right, but my answer is that their private business has intruded into state government first, and that public service is a privilege and an honor and it is a sacrifice that they must make.”State Senate Leader Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre), who regained control of the state’s upper legislative chamber in the November elections, signaled support for reform as well amid reports that he is also under investigation—reports that he denied. “We are always open to building on the reforms we’ve already enacted to improve the state’s ethics and disclosure laws for all branches of government, and will take a close look at what the governor is proposing in the hopes of working together to achieve a positive result,” Skelos said in a statement. He noted that he expected the budget to pass on time.Assemb. Charles Lavine (D-Glen Cove), chairman of the ethics committee, said any discussion about such reform cannot come without public hearings to fully hash out the proposals.“In discussions with many Assemblymembers over the last days, it becomes obvious that the word reform has many meanings and seems, like beauty, to be in the eye of the beholder, ranging from new district office furniture to term limits to the return of member item discretionary funding,” Lavine said in an email to fellow legislators. “Some of my colleagues want to adopt reforms immediately. While this desire may be a natural reaction to our crisis, there is absolutely no unanimity on the form these reforms should take.”Among the proposals Cuomo called for was publicly financed elections—a plan designed to mitigate the influence of money in political campaigns. But, a pilot program for such a plan famously failed last year by only applying the state comptroller’s race and being enacted midway through the campaign cycle. That flop paled in comparison to the fallout from Cuomo’s Moreland Commission on public corruption, which he disbanded before its investigation was complete last year.Preet Brarara, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, subpoenaed those files and continued that investigation, leading to Silver’s arrest for allegedly using his power to earn more than $4 million in bribes and kickbacks through two private law firms. Silver pleaded not guilty to fraud, and although he resigned from his leadership post, he has not vacated his Assembly seat. Brarara, who has said the investigation into Albany public corruption is continuing, warned: “Stay tuned.”last_img read more


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first_img A specially equipped isolation ward at Uige province’s 400-bed hospital is empty, even though Marburg cases and deaths are occurring in the area, the WHO reported. “It is apparent that, for the time being, the community does not accept the concept of isolation,” the agency said. “Residents are unwilling to report suspected cases and allow these people to be managed under conditions that reduce the risk of further transmission.” Yesterday the WHO said travelers to Angola should be aware of the Marburg outbreak and avoid close contact with sick people. People who have existing medical conditions and might require hospitalization should consider postponing travel to Angola, and especially to Uige, officials said. To make matters worse, four Red Cross volunteers who had just been trained to educate local residents about the disease were killed by lightning today while on their way to work, the WHO statement said. The agency had announced just yesterday that the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies had decided to send more volunteers to Uige to help fight the epidemic by running educational campaigns. In the past the federation has helped control large outbreaks of Ebola fever, a disease much like Marburg fever. See also: Apr 14 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_04_14a/en/ But Dr. Mike Ryan of the WHO said that even if the drug seems to work in monkeys, it could be months before it could be tried in human patients, according to the story. Travelers leaving Angola should seek medical attention if they experience any illness with fever within 10 days after their departure, the agency said. Further, “WHO recommends that travelers with a clear exposure history be treated as contacts and placed under surveillance for 21 days, during which time their temperature should be monitored daily.” Apr 13 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_04_13/en/ Officials said they were not aware of any Marburg cases in foreign nationals other than those involved in caring for patients in Uige. In other developments, US Army scientists are investigating whether a drug that has shown promise against Ebola fever might work against Marburg, the Associated Press reported yesterday. The report said the drug cured Ebola in a third of a group of monkeys that were treated with it in 2003. Apr 14, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – As the death toll in Angola’s Marburg hemorrhagic fever epidemic reached 215, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported today that Angolans are refusing to report suspected cases and allow patients to be treated in isolation. Because of the resistance to control measures, the agency said, “Family members and other caregivers who refuse to allow patients to be cared for in the isolation facility are being informed of ways to protect themselves from infection and given appropriate supplies. WHO has placed urgent orders for disinfectants, which are currently in short supply in Angola.” In reporting the Red Cross workers’ deaths, the WHO said it “recognizes the importance of this support and deeply regrets the death of these volunteers.” The WHO said the outbreak amounted to 235 cases, including 215 deaths, as of Apr 12, up from 231 cases and 210 deaths the day before. Uige remained the center of the outbreak, with 208 cases and 194 deaths.last_img read more


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first_img“We will expose their schemes. Theyare earning a large amount of money in Negros. They call it ‘land cultivationarea,” Pasaporte added. He said the amount could be more,considering some leaders of the rebel movement have been allegedly pocketing aportion of their earnings. “They (CPP-NPA) have long beendeceiving the people of Negros. They should no longer be allowed to do that,”he said. BACOLOD City – Aside from pursuing thecommunist insurgents, the government soldiers will also focus on the group’s“money-making schemes” in the Negros Island.        Pasaporte said he will lead the BrownEagle Brigade in maintaining the operational measures to sustain peace anddevelopment in his area of responsibility. “There’s corruption within theirranks,” he added, saying the Communist Party of the Philippines-New People’sArmy (CPP-NPA) has put up small businesses as part of their allegedmoney-making schemes.   The 79th Infantry Battalion in SagayCity and the 62IB in Isabela town in Negros Occidental were under the 303IBalong with the 94IB based in Guihulngan City, Negros Oriental.(With a report from PNA/PN) Army Colonel Inocencio Pasaporte (right), who assumed as commander of the 303rd Infantry Brigade based in Murcia, Negros Occidental on Dec. 12, meets Gov. Eugenio Jose Lacson after the change of command held at the brigade headquarters. PNA/NANETTE L. GUADALQUIVER center_img Colonel Inocencio Pasaporte, whoassumed as commander of the 303rd Infantry Brigade (IB) here on Thursday, saidthe communist-terrorist group has been earning over P20-million yearly fromvarious funding sources since five years earlier. Pasaporte, who succeeded BrigadierGeneral Benedict Arevalo, added the 303IB troops will focus on the CPP-NPA’ssupport elements and their united front organizations. “Whether aboveground or underground,these organizations, they are continuously deceiving the people of Negros. Iwill also give focus on that aspect,” he said. “To be able to do this, we will doubleour efforts to reduce further the biggest criminal syndicate being run by theminions of Joma Sison here in Negros, in terms of their manpower and firearmsthrough our intensified operations,” he added. The 303IB covers the northern andcentral parts of the island, including the first to fifth districts of NegrosOccidental and the first district of Negros Oriental. “Most importantly, we have gained theoperational tempo in our favor, in Negros Occidental,” he added.last_img read more