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first_imgTo ensure that public health interventions that can save lives and improve overall health actually reach people, epidemiologists must do two things. They must provide clear evidence of the need for such interventions. They must also convince policymakers to then take action on the evidence.This was the theme addressed at a symposium on “translational epidemiology” on February 20, 2013, hosted by the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) Department of Epidemiology.Speakers included Anna Giuliano, director of the Center for Infection Research in Cancer at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Florida, who spoke about the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine and the need to offer it to boys as well as girls; and Cesar Victora, emeritus professor of epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil, and president of the International Epidemiological Association, who discussed the importance of providing better nutrition to young children in low- and middle-income countries.In his opening remarks, HSPH epidemiology professor George Seage said members of HSPH’s Department of Epidemiology are increasingly focusing on translational work, which aims to apply research findings into real-world public health interventions. The challenge in many cases is to determine the most cost-effective approach to scaling up interventions, and how to best design studies to measure the long-term effectiveness of the interventions, Seage said. Read Full Storylast_img read more


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first_imgNathan Keyfitz, Andelot Professor of Sociology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and of Demography in the Faculty of Public Health, passed away on April 6, 2010, in Lexington, Massachusetts. He was 96 years old.Considered the preeminent mathematical demographer of his day, Keyfitz was a pioneer in the application of mathematical methods to the study of populations. His publications, including six books and over a hundred articles, cover a wide range of topics including population theory, historical demography, mortality, urbanization, forecasting, the relationship between retirement and social security, poverty, and the interplay between populations and their environments. His research and consulting activities involved numerous countries including Indonesia, Italy, India, Russia, China, Ceylon, and Argentina.Keyfitz was a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the Royal Statistical Society, the American Statistical Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences. He was the recipient of seven honorary doctorates, won the Mindel C. Sheps Award of the Population Association of America in 1976, and the Common Wealth Award of Distinguished Service in 1991. A symposium on mathematical demography was held at Ohio State University in his honor in June 2013.The citation to the Mindel C. Sheps Award noted that, “Dr. Keyfitz’s original contributions have included an exposition of the momentum factor in population growth, advances in the understanding of multiple decrement tables, refinement of life table construction methods and innovations in the design and evaluation of population projections. He has enriched the field by bringing in techniques from mathematical biology and mathematics. He has been a leader, too, in the application of computer to demographic phenomena.”Three of Keyfitz’s books were particularly influential. His Introduction to the Mathematics of Population (1968) became a foundational text for the field of mathematical demography and was the textbook for many years for courses in this field. His Applied Mathematical Demography (1977) broke new ground by showing how changes in specific factors that regulate population dynamics, such as birth and mortality rates, determine the characteristics of a population such as its age distribution. In addition, Keyfitz examined what would be the effects of eradicating specific diseases and the implementation of family planning. Keyfitz’s third major book, Population Change and Social Policy (1982), showed how demographic methods can be used to analyze a vast variety of social policy issues: the effects of birth control and abortion, the calculation of annuities from unisex life tables, where medical research should focus, needed adjustments to social security, and the effects of societal demography on innovation.Keyfitz was born in Montreal on June 29, 1913. He earned his BS.c. degree in mathematics from McGill University in 1934 and his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Chicago in 1952. Keyfitz started his career as a statistician at the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in Ottawa, Canada, where he worked for more than 20 years studying dimensions of the Canadian population. Over the remainder of his professional career, he held academic appointments at the Universities of Toronto, the University of Chicago, the University of California, and Ohio State University, as well as Harvard.Keyfitz was a professor at Harvard from 1972 to 1983 in the Department of Sociology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and in the Department of Population Science at the Harvard School of Public Health. He directed Harvard’s Center for Population and Development Studies from September 1973 to January 1975. He also served as chair of the Department of Sociology from 1978 to 1980.Keyfitz became professor emeritus at Harvard and moved to Ohio State where he was the Lazarus Professorship in Population Studies. In 1983 Keyfitz joined the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna, Austria, first becoming its deputy director and the founding head of its demography department and later its president.The quintessentially polite and gentlemanly Canadian, Keyfitz was known for his warm and giving spirit. He was generous with his time, always being available to students and his colleagues. He loved exploring ideas with others and taught courses with colleagues with very different methodologies and theoretical perspectives in sociology. Keyfitz was also a deeply committed family man. He adored his wife, Beatrice, and was a loving father and grandfather. He is survived by his children, Robert and Barbara, grandchildren, Benjamin, Elizabeth, and Alexander, and his sister, Ruth Karp.Respectfully submitted,Orlando PattersonMary C. WatersChristopher Winship, Chairlast_img read more


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first_img Read Full Story During the decade she spent as a physician assistant at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, Jill Roncarati saw, up close and personal, the ravages people suffered when they had no place to live. Cancers went undetected until they’d reached an advanced stage. Preventable complications from untreated diabetes emerged. Substance abuse problems dragged on for years.Roncarati eventually decided the best way to help improve health among homeless people would be to study why they were faring so poorly—which led her to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where she earned a master’s of public health degree in 2007 and is now slated to earn a doctorate in social and behavioral sciences next fall.Her doctoral research has focused on mortality rates and causes among the so-called “rough sleepers” in Boston—those who sleep outside for months at a time. “There hasn’t been a lot of research about this group,” Roncarati said. “I thought it would be important to really understand their situation in order to serve them best.”Roncarati studied psychology in college. Figuring she might work in the health care field, she also took courses in chemistry and biology. After college she worked in biochemistry labs. But she wasn’t sure what she wanted to do.One day when she was working at Boston University School of Medicine’s Pulmonary Center, one of the pulmonologists invited her to shadow him for a day at the Pine Street Inn, a Boston homeless shelter, while he conducted a tuberculosis (TB) clinic.last_img read more


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first_imgMaster American dramatist Arthur Miller would have been 100 this year (he died 10 years ago), and to celebrate his centenniel, New York theatergoers are being treated to two major revivals on Broadway (A View from the Bridge and The Crucible) as well as a wonderful Signature Theater production of his 1964 play Incident at Vichy, which opened of-Broadway on November 15. Check out a photo of the cast above and star Richard Thomas with Arthur Miller’s daughter, Rebecca Miller, and Signature’s artistic director James Houghton below. Incident at Vichy Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 13, 2015 Related Shows View Commentslast_img


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first_img During the operation, Ecuadorian security forces located the small submarine on the coast near the town of Limones, in the province of Esmeraldas. The area is near the Colombian border. Ecuadorian National Police officers seized the submarine “in an operation that had the support of Colombia,” Serrano said. Ecuadorian police “received major technical cooperation from the (Colombian National Police) and the Colombian government.” No one was inside or near the submarine when security forces found it, Serrano said. Security forces took the submarine to an Ecuadorian Navy base, he explained. Two days after security forces captured the submarine, Ecuadorian authorities in the city of Esmeraldas arrested a man and a woman who are suspected of being linked to the submarine, Serrano said. Ecuadorian National Police are investigating whether the two suspects helped operate the submarine and whether others were involved, Serrano said. “There is no doubt that this submarine was ready to be used by Mexican and Colombian cartels to ship cocaine and other illegal drugs ,” said ” Hector Chavez , a security analyst at the University of Guayaquil. Organized crime groups do not produce drugs in Ecuador, but they move drugs produced in other countries, such as Colombia and Brazil, through the country, according to Chavez, the security analyst. “Ecuador is not known for being a producer of illicit drugs , but because of its geographical position , international drug gangs make efforts to claim territory there and set up drug trafficking operations,” Chavez said. It is not surprising that the Sinaloa Cartel is operating in Ecuador, Chavez explained. “That is one of the characteristics of El Chapo Guzman, he forms alliances with gangs in other countries,” the security analyst said. Submarine located Mexican drug cartels in Ecuador and Colombia Drug trafficking center The Sinaloa Cartel and Los Zetas, both of which are major Mexican transnational criminal organizations, operate in Ecuador and Colombia, Ecuadorian Deputy Minister of Internal Security Javier Cordova said in an interview with ECTV, a public television station. International cooperation is crucial in the fight against the drug cartels, Cordova said. “If we pretend or believe that we can successfully battle narco-trafficking by ourselves, we would be mistaken,” Cordova said. Ecuadorian authorities have captured dozens of operatives from transnational criminal organizations in recent years: • In October 2013, the Ecuadorian National Police captured 10 members of the gang Los Urabenos de Colombia. Some of the suspects were Ecuadorians who were working with the Colombian gang, authorities said. • In August 2013, Ecuadorian police captured Eliezer Rodríguez Jorge, the alleged leader of Los Rastrojos, a Colombian organized crime group. He is known as “Palustre.” Ecuadorian authorities turned “Palustre” over to Colombian officials. • In May 2013, Ecuadorian National Police officers arrested five Ecuadorians and four Mexican nationals who were suspected of being part of an international drug trafficking network. The police also seized 452 kilograms of cocaine and $276,567 in cash. The arrests and seizures were part of “Operation Aluvión.” • In April 2013, Ecuadorian National Police alerted the country’s Coast Guard that a yacht in Ecuadorian waters was carrying a large amount of cocaine. A Coast Guard vessel chased the boat, which was named the “Green Onion,” which fled to international waters. The Ecuadorian Navy alerted the U.S. Coast Guard, which captured the boat in international waters near Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. When the crew members saw they were about to be captured, they burned about four tons of cocaine that were on the yacht, authorities said. • In June 2012, Ecuadoran authorities found a small airplane with Mexican registration abandoned inside a hangar in San Pablo, in the coastal province of Santa Elena. The aircraft was probably used to smuggle drugs, authorities said. • Also in June 2012, Ecuadorian security forces seized a submarine that was under construction, a light plane, a speedboat, and a ton of cocaine. The light plane and speedboat were undoubtedly being used by drug traffickers, and the submarine was going to be used for drug smuggling if it had been completed, said Ricardo Camacho Zeas, an Ecuadorian security analyst. The Ecuadorian Coastguard discovered the submarine hidden beneath mud and shrubs on an islet between the Verdes and Escalante Islands, in the Gulf of Guayaquil, authorities said. The submarine was 15 meters long and four meters wide, with a capacity of transporting up to 15 tons of drugs. The submarine was about 70 percent complete, officials said. The Coastguard intercepted the speedboat 12 miles off the coast of Canoa, in Manabi province. The boat was powered by three outboard engines of 350-horsepower each. The speedboat left Chiapas on June 7, 2012, and was equipped with modern communications equipment, a high-frequency transmitter, and enough food for several days. Ecuadorian security forces arrested three Mexican nationals who were operating the boat. Ecuadorian security forces found the ton of cocaine amid rocks at San Clemente Beach, a few miles from where the speedboat was captured. The men in the speedboat were probably on their way to pick up the cocaine, authorities said. The light aircraft was found abandoned inside a hangar in San Pablo. The airplane was registered in Mexico. • In May 2013, a small airplane from Mexico crashed in Manabi province. Ecuadorian authorities found $1.4 million in cash on the plane. The pilot and co-pilot were both killed in the crash. They were from Sinaloa, Mexico, which is a stronghold for El Chapo Guzman. center_img Drug traffickers probably used the submarine to smuggle drugs, such as cocaine, to northern destinations such as the United States, Guatemala, and Costa Rica, according to Pinzon. The submarine had enough space to “mobilize about 600 kilos of drugs in each trip,” Pinzon said. Serrano thanked Colombia for its help in seizing the submarine and also for its assistance in tracking down several fugitives who fled Ecuador in recent months and tried to hide in Colombia. olombia for their assistance in the recapture of offenders who have fled to the neighboring country . “We appreciate the support of Colombia and the police , especially in stopping dangerous criminals who who escaped from prisons in Ecuador ,” Serrano said. In February 2013, 19 inmates escaped from a high-security Ecuadorian prison in Guayaquil, located about 420 kilometers south of Quito. Cesar Demar Vernaza Quinonez, who is known as “The Entrepreneur,” was among those who escaped in February. The Entrepreneur is the leader of a gang, known as “Los Templados,” which collaborates with the Sinaloa Cartel, authorities said. Los Templados transports and protects drug shipments for the cartel, which is led by fugitive kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman. Colombian security forces recaptured The Entrepreneur in that country in April 2013. The Entrepreneur was extradited to Ecuador, where is facing drug trafficking charges. By Dialogo October 31, 2013 The importance of cooperation Colombian and Ecuadorian security forces recently collaborated to capture a submarine that authorities suspect was being used to smuggle drugs. During a press conference in Cartagena, Ecuadorian Interior Minister Jose Serrano announced the seizure of the submarine on Oct. 20, 2013. Serrano was in the city for the 82nd General Assembly of Interpol. Serrano was joined at the press conference by Colombian Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón. Security forces from Ecuador seized the submarine under “Operation Progress,” Serrano said. In a separate operation, on Oct. 28, the Ecuadorian Coast Guard captured a speedboat allegedly carrying 468 kilograms of cocaine about 1,800 kilometers from the port of Esmeraldas. Two boat operators were arrested, authorities said. U.S. security forces assisted in the operation. In two separate operations, Ecuadorian security forces found a large amount of cocaine alkaloid at a port, and the Coastguard captured a speedboat allegedly carrying a large amount of cocaine. Large drug seizures in Ecuador On Oct. 30, agents with anti-narcotics division of the Attorney General’s office found 1.5 tons of cocaine alkaloid hidden inside a freight container at the port of Guayquil, Serrano announced through his Twitter account. “We must eradicate this crime that is destroying us,” Serrano wrote. The interior minister commended the work of the investigators who found the drugs. Security forces seized the cocaine alkaloid, which was hidden inside a container of pineapples and was bounded to Belgium. In September 2013, Ecuadorian security forces at the port discovered 30 kilograms of cocaine hidden inside a container of bananas. The container was destined for the Netherlands. On Oct. 28, the Ecuadorian Coastguard captured a speedboat allegedly carrying 468 kilograms of cocaine about 1,800 kilometers from the port of Esmeraldas. Two boat operators were arrested, authorities said. U.S. security forces assisted in the operation. last_img read more


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first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The digital banking boom is still booming. On a fundamental level, this digital banking focus has centered on a singular goal: providing a great customer experience. But in the realm of banking statements, it seems bankers—and customers—are at a crossroads. Should banks continue to invest in paper statements, or have digital statements muscled out the old standard?The answer isn’t as cut and dried as some might believe. In fact, when it comes to allocating the banker’s budget, the topic can be downright polarizing.Traditional eStatements vs. Digital eStatements When considering whether your institution should prioritize budgets for paper statements or digital statements, it’s important that a distinction be made between traditional eStatements and digital eStatements.Before the digital banking boom, consumers were content to receive their monthly bank statements in the mail. But through the advent of the internet—and more specifically, email— many financial institutions now offer eStatements directly to their customers’ inboxes. These traditional eStatements, usually sent in a PDF format, save the institution print and mail costs, but do little to enhance the customer experience. This is because a PDF, much like a physical paper statement, is a static document. And while customers might be happy to reduce the clutter in their mailboxes, a PDF in their inbox doesn’t exactly provide the “wow” factor of mobile banking, social payments and other notable digital banking staples.last_img read more


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first_imgThousands of people in Jakarta are at risk of becoming homeless after losing their livelihoods because of the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, several NGOs have reported.”Between April 20 and 24, we received 71 complaints from Jakartans saying they are struggling to pay their rent,” Rujak Center for Urban Studies executive director Elisa Sutanudjaja said in a teleconference on Wednesday.The complaints, she said, ranged from sellers to college students, housewives, construction workers, taxi drivers, app-based ride-hailing drivers and app-based massage therapists. Read also: Indonesia’s economy heads into turbulence as Q1 growth plunges: Economists”I’ve fallen behind on my rent for more than a month. I’ve talked to my landlord but I don’t know how long he can give me leniency,” Budi said in the teleconference.Budi, who used to worker as a hawker in Ancol, said he lost his livelihood after the Jakarta administration temporarily closed tourist destinations in the city to curb the spread of the virus.”I’ve tried to earn money in other ways but I’ve only made enough to feed my wife and three children; it isn’t enough to pay our Rp 1 million rent each month,” he said.Elisa said the government should provide a safety net to ensure residents who rented homes would not become homeless.”The government should provide a mechanism to give renters leniency or provide rental relief,” she said.The government could also cooperate with NGOs to list residents who have become homeless.”The government could provide temporary housing for residents who have been evicted from their rental homes by utilizing sport halls, schools, mosques or vocational training centers,” she said.Read also: Indonesia could enter recession as virus response remains fractured, unclear: EconomistsLBH Jakarta director Arif Maulana said the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic had also put people who borrowed money from online lenders at risk of intimidation and data breaches.”In the last two months we have recorded 53 cases related to online lenders. Many residents are struggling to pay their debts because of the pandemic. However, creditors refuse to provide leniency despite the current situation,” Arif said on Wednesday.He said many borrowers experienced online or even physicals threats from creditors after falling behind on their dues.”Some creditors even leak the borrowers’ data online.”According to Arief, layoffs were the second most common legal issue the institute handled during the pandemic.”We have received 35 complaints regarding layoffs in the last two months. Apparently many companies have refused to fulfill their obligations when laying off employees. “Some residents said they were pressured to resign from their jobs so that the company did not have to pay severance pay. Some companies did not pay the employees’ health insurance for months before they were laid off, some purposefully laid off by their employees before Ramadan so they do not have to pay for the Idul Fitri holiday bonuses,” he said.Topics : Thousands of other Jakarta residents are also at risk of losing their homes.”Thirty five percent of Jakarta residents live in rented homes,” she said.A recent survey conducted by the Amrta Institute, Lokataru Foundation, Indonesian Legal Aid Foundation (YLBHI), Jakarta Legal Aid Institute (LBH Jakarta) and Rujak Center for Urban Studies found that around 27 percent of Jakartans were now struggling to pay their rent.Budiarso, a resident from Pademangan Barat, North Jakarta is one of these people.last_img read more


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first_imgAC Milan star Zlatan Ibrahimovic returned to Italy on Monday after two months in his native Sweden, as Serie A prepares to resume group training in a week’s time.Ibrahmivoic was photographed arriving in Milan wearing a facemask and gloves before being driven to the team’s training centre at Milanello.The Swede is expected to spent two-weeks in quarantine before joining his teammates who got back to individual training last week with group training set to start again on May 18. The 38-year-old returned to Sweden on March 12 days after Serie A was suspended as the coronavirus pandemic swept through Italy and Europe.Ibrahimovic has been busy training in Sweden with players at Hammarby, a first-division club, which he part owns.Unlike much of the rest of Europe, where containment has limited or prevented athletes training, in Sweden restrictions to contain Covid-19 have been more flexible. Serie A stars have all returned to the peninsula with Juventus forward Cristiano Ronaldo flying back to Italy last Monday from his native Portugal. Topics :last_img read more


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first_img68 Spring Street, West EndMr Koolik said they’ve moved on from inner-city farming with the back yard becoming a place to while away the time while their two daughters enjoyed some space to play.He said the family always took the chance to utilise the home’s inviting outdoors, whether it was meals on the back deck or mornings on the front porch.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours ago“The kids, especially when they were a bit younger, enjoyed playing out there in the morning sun as well,” he said. 68 Spring Street, West End“When it all gets a bit much we just head down to GOMA (Gallery of Modern Art) – the kids love the kids section down there – or the dinosaurs down the road there next to the museum.”Mr Koolik said opportunities interstate meant the family were leaving Queensland, but it won’t be an easy goodbye.“Leaving behind the schools and the friends and the proximity and all of that is always difficult, but there’s different opportunities where were going as well.”“It’s kind of with heavy hearts we move out of West End. I don’t think you can replace it.”The home will be auctioned on site at 1.30pm Saturday August 12, by McGrath New Farm. Rebecca and Nigel Koolik and their children, Sia (6) and Rowena (4)at the house they’re auctioning this weekend. Picture: Peter WallisWhen Nigel Koolik and wife, Rebecca, bought 68 Spring St, West End in 2009, schools, community and easy access to the city were the motivators.Fast forward eight years to auction day and the couple will probably discover it was also a savvy investment.The classic three-bedroom, one-bathroom 1920s Queenslander cottage is not only well presented and in an enviable position, it’s on a 721sq m site – regarded by some as ‘West End acreage.’“I think in the last financial year there were four houses sold with bigger blocks than ours, so they certainly don’t come up too often,” Mr Koolik said.“We had a bunch of chooks in the back and veges, and a bunch of fruit trees down the side,” he said.center_img 68 Spring Street, West EndMr Koolik said they’d renovated too, opening up the living space near the kitchen and lounge.“We’ve put the built ins in. With most Queenslanders the hardest part is storage, so the floor-to-ceiling cupboards suck up a lot of volume of the rubbish you collect over the years with the kids.”And when not indoors, Mr Koolik said the family loved discovering their surroundings such as riverside parks and the markets.last_img read more


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first_imgTGS has completed processing of the northern half of the Utsira ocean-bottom node (OBN) multi-client survey in the Norwegian North Sea and delivered it to pre-funding customers. Data processing will be complete for the southern half of Utsira in September 2020, the company said.Undertaken in conjunction with its partner, Axxis Geo Solutions (AGS) the 1,584-square kilometer Utsira survey was completed in October 2019. The total number of nodes deployed for the survey was 143,567.Kristian Johansen, CEO at TGS, said: “TGS has been at the forefront of the recent commercial development of multi-client OBN technologies and the launch of our Utsira OBN data library is a further step forward in our efforts to grow this market over the next decade. Our OBN data is defining a new reference point for quality subsurface imaging which will be imperative for E&P companies as they seek to maximize the life of producing fields and production facilities.”last_img read more