Use of RTI to hold authorities accountable growing

Tag: Sonte

Tomorrow (3rd February 2018) marks one year since the Right to Information (RTI) Act became operational in Sri Lanka. While there remain challenges to overcome, the engagement of citizens in using RTI to hold authorities accountable as well as to resolve problems of a personal nature has been extremely encouraging, Transparency International Sri Lanka (TISL) said.TISL said that both uses have resulted in the increased transparency of public processes, one RTI request at a time. TISL notes that there remain major concerns for RTI rollout. Public knowledge regarding the existence and process of the RTI Act has been notably inadequate, and much remains to be done on the part of the State. Similarly, the transition from the culture of secrecy to one which allows public participation and scrutiny continues to raise challenges.TISL further notes with concern the trend of a vast number of citizens resorting to the use of RTI as a problem-solving tool due to the failure of public services, and encourages public authorities to observe such trends and take steps to proactively remedy such issues. However, it is also important to commend the numerous public authorities that have been proactive in their responses to RTI requests and have even gone so far as to actively seek out knowledge on how to operationalize the RTI Act.As we mark one year since the RTI in Sri Lanka became a reality, TISL called on the state to raise awareness regarding the RTI among citizens, particularly through the state media, and to continue its work on sensitizing the public sector on the need for open and participatory governance. TISL further called upon citizens to exercise their Right to Information to constructively engage in governance, and to protect this right from any possibility of dilution. (Colombo Gazette) TISL commends the key role played by the Ministry of Mass Media for their service in training information officers, designated officers and other public officials across the country. Furthermore, the efforts of the RTI Commission in hearing appeals, as well as getting in place the other infrastructure needed, including the call for record management and proactive disclosure, among further creative endeavours such as online RTI training for government officials is noteworthy. While recognizing the key role played by the first RTI Commission in any country, TISL notes with appreciation that Sri Lanka’s RTI Commission has in 84% of its recorded appeal decisions ordered the disclosure of information.Commenting on the crucial role of the State in ensuring information disclosure, Executive Director of TISL, Asoka Obeyesekere stated, “We are encouraged by the fact that many State institutions have demonstrated their readiness to disclose the information they possess, in a timely fashion, and would encourage citizens to exercise their Right to Information and experience first-hand an accountable state.” Throughout the year, Transparency International Sri Lanka together with its partners including the Sarvodaya Shramadana Sangamaya, has worked towards furthering the cause of RTI and raising public awareness through the RTI request facilitation hubs, street dramas, RTI van and RTI movie amongst other things. In addition to filing public interest RTI requests on a regular basis, TISL has facilitated 610 requests for members of the public, working in 10 districts, and has found that in most instances, information has been received by the requesters. Sarvodaya have facilitated 233 RTI requests in the one year since the RTI Act became operational, across their 5 district RTI Hubs. From securing the land rights of a dispossessed farmer in Gampaha, exposing the construction of a substandard public school building in Omanthai to securing deeds of ownership for 1200 families in Vavuniya, RTI has played a life-changing role in the lives of citizens while promoting democratic governance, acting as a tool to combat corruption and restoring sovereignty in the people of Sri Lanka. Within the space of one year, RTI has already displayed strength in citizens’ collective action, as well as individual action. read more


Tag: Sonte

Swimming isn’t just what Gokhan Bozyigit does for fun, or for the thrill of competing. It’s who he is.It’s what brought him to Canada from his native Turkey. It’s what then brought him to Brock University. And it’s what has given him clear career goals, both as an athlete and as a coach.“Without swimming I am pretty sure I would have never thought about coming to Canada,” he said. “All I can say is swimming is my whole life. It is a part of who I am and without it I would be lost.”Coming off two medals at the OUA Swimming Championships recently, Bozyigit is ready to make a splash when he competes at the U SPORTS National Swimming Championships, which began Thursday and run until Saturday at the University of British Columbia.Competing at the OUAs hosted at Brock, he won a silver medal in the men’s 1,500-metre freestyle with a time of 15 minutes, 42.32 seconds. He also won a bronze medal in the men’s 400m freestyle with a time of 3:57.55. He’s one of three Badgers in B.C. this week to compete at Nationals: Bozyigit, Anthonie Korstanje (Niagara Falls) and Maggie Smith (Severn, Ont.).“Competing at OUAs is always a fun and stressful experience for me. I’ve been chasing the podium for the last three years and I really wanted to medal and show my real performance,” said Bozyigit. “With the support of my teammates, I was able to enjoy OUAs too.”Like his teammates, Bozyigit’s training schedule is a brutal grind: eight sessions a week, 11 months of the year.Yet he’s never missed a practice.“Gokhan is very focused and hard working,” said head coach Peter Bradstreet. “He comes from an eastern European culture where hard work equals success, and that has brought him success in swimming. He does not question anything asked of him. He just tries to do it to the best of his abilities and never gives up.”Bozyigit started competitive swimming while growing up in Istanbul, Turkey.The reason he fell into swimming is kind of amusing, he said.“I was always ambitious about playing sports for my whole life,” he said. “During elementary school, I was more interested in basketball and tried out for my school’s team.”After tryouts, the coach approached Bozyigit and told him he was too much of a gentleman to play basketball and that he should try a sport like swimming.“After this recommendation I tried out for the swim team and those coaches told me that I had a natural talent,” he said.From 2011-15, Bozyigit racked up a shelf full of medals in his home country’s national swim meets.It was during this time that he transitioned to long course races and used his natural ability for endurance to compete in the 400m, 800m and 1,500m freestyle events.“I had a difficult time in reaching good scores and getting a place in the top five until 2012,” said Bozyigit. “The breaking point in my swimming career was having the professional help of a sports dietitian. They uncovered that I needed a different diet to cover the gap caused by my metabolism. I re-organized my nutrition according to my training load and quickly started to improve my results.”During Bozyigit’s first visit to Canada in Grade 10, he toured Brock’s facilities and chatted with a couple of the swimmers. He returned the next year and trained with the Badgers for a week.In Grade 12, Bozyigit’s family moved to Canada, and he attended Sir Winston Churchill Secondary in St. Catharines before coming to Brock.“Without swimming, my life would be a mess,” he said. “It helped me keep my mental health and sort out my problems in life. It also helped me get scholarships from my high school and Brock University, which gave me an opportunity to have a better education. And most importantly, it helped me to come to Canada.”Whatever team or group Bozyigit is a part of, he’s all in, according to Bradstreet. He’s first in line when Brock Sports is looking for event volunteers.“Gokhan has an extreme thankfulness for the opportunities that Canada, and specifically Brock, have given him. He is a consummate team guy, always looking for ways to help younger and less-skilled teammates and swimmers,” said Bradstreet. “He is involved with coaching some of our younger novice swimmers and they love him, as do their parents, because he genuinely cares about them.”When Bozyigit won the Ontario Open Water Championships last July, he almost missed the medal ceremony because one of the young swimmers he coached was competing in her first open water race.“He wanted to be there to congratulate her,” said Bradstreet. “I think that demonstrates everything you need to know about his character.”Bozyigit, a third-year Physical Education student, is hoping to compete in the 2020 Olympic Summer Games and to coach a new generation of athletes.“As a career goal, I would like to work with professional and varsity athletes. My ambition is to identify young talent and train them to be worldwide athletes, and to be proud of them.” read more