RSF condemns attack on journalist

Tag: Nunez

Reporters Without Borders (RSF) and its partner organization, Journalists for Democracy in Sri Lanka, firmly condemn an attempt to murder Sunday Leader journalist Faraz Shaukatally on the night 15 February, when he was shot and wounded by gunmen inside his Colombo home. Doctors say his life is no longer in danger.“This appalling shooting suggests that the enemies of media freedom are trying to silence those journalists who still dare to report the news freely,” Reporters Without Borders and Journalists for Democracy in Sri Lanka said. “We urge the authorities to react to this attack without delay and, in their investigation, to focus on the possibility that it was linked to his work, which seems the most likely motive at this stage. Shaukatally must also be given police protection at the hospital where he is being treated and after he leaves it, as well.” Sri Lanka is classified by Reporters Without Borders as a country “under surveillance” because of its violations of online freedom of expression and is ranked 162nd out of 179 countries in its 2013 press freedom index. “Even if a thorough investigation is needed to determine the motive with certainty, there are already many indications that this attack was a reprisal for Shaukatally’s journalistic activities, especially as he had been threatened shortly after writing articles about government corruption and private sector embezzlement. Witnesses say unidentified men went to his home two weeks ago, asking where he was. The Sunday Leader said: “It was clear that the attack on Faraz was well planned and coordinated as the gunmen knew the exact time he was at home on Friday, where his room is located and if he was alone in his room.”This attack comes just weeks after the third anniversary of cartoonist Prageeth Ekneligoda’s disappearance on 24 January 2010, the fourth anniversary of Sunday Leader editor Lasantha Wickrematunga’s murder on 8 January 2009 and the four anniversary of an attempt on the lives of Rivira editor Upali Tennakoon and his wife, also in January 2009.Sri Lankan journalists are constantly the targets of threats and reprisals, often by the government. Former Sunday Leader editor Frederica Jansz recently talked to Reporters Without Borders about the violence and impunity that undermines the work of the media and forced her to flee the country. Shaukatally was speaking by phone with editorial staff at the Sunday Leader from his home in the south Colombo district of Mount Lavina when three intruders appeared, cut his phone line and opened fire, wounding him in the neck.Foreign tourists staying in the guest house beside his home took him to Colombo National Hospital, where doctors managed to extract the bullet fragments from his neck during the next 24 hours. read more


Tag: Nunez

first_imgHe added: “Islam is also incompatible with, and indeed a threat to, our religious and civil liberties, as is very evident from the situation which prevails in those countries where it dominates. “The oppression of Christians and the reduced status of women under Islam are well-known, as is the willingness of some of its followers to spread its influence by violent means.” The building under construction The 2011 census indicated that at the time there were 61 Muslims and 20,452 Christians in the Western Isles. Mr Rashid said: “Against all odds and opposition from the Free Church of Scotland they have now been granted permission to build. “I have been personally requested to go up and help them with the build and planning due to my experience in building mosques.”A derelict house is now in the process of being converted into a mosque for the community. In a press release published at the end of last year the Rev David M Blunt, of the Presbytery of the Outer Hebrides, said the establishment of the mosque would mean that “Islam will be able to promote itself in our midst through public worship, despite its beliefs and practices being alien to the religious convictions of the vast majority of our community”.  The first mosque in the Outer Hebrides is set to open this summer despite the Presbyterian Free Church praying that it is never built. A fundraising drive for the mosque, which has already been granted planning permission, has raised £56,000 within days of launch, outstripping its £50,000 target.But the mosque faces fierce opposition from the local arm of the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing) which has urged followers to pray that “no mosque will ever appear in Stornoway”. Plans to create a mosque have been led by Aihtsham Rashid, 39, a builder from Leeds, who said he had been contacted by the growing Syrian community on the Isle of Lewis asking for help. Six further families have recently arrived from Syria, growing the area’s small Muslim community. center_img Aihtsham Rashid from Leeds was asked to help by the growing Syrian community on the Isle of Lewis Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more