Lessons from Wologizi: The Challenges of Navigating Centuries of Taboos, Traditions and Customary Practices…

Tag: 419上海约会

first_imgBy Radiatu Haja Sheriff-Kahnplaye, Policy Advisor, Natural Resources Women Platform BackgroundLiberia is currently in the middle of a defining presidential and legislative election with about 20 presidential candidates and thousands of legislative candidates. The electoral process for 2017 including a controversial Supreme Court decision has brought into question as to whether the outcome would be credible and peaceful, especially given that the United Nations peace keeping force is also withdrawing from the country.As Liberians cautiously observe the electoral process, they are also being reminded of the havoc of the years of civil war which resulted in the death of approximately 250,000 people driven by widespread greed over natural resources and wealth illegally obtained from such resources. There were violations of human rights which were compounded by systematic inequality and the loss of livelihoods. Women became the worst victims and suffered the most. They painfully experienced some of the most egregious and indescribable forms of violence and abuse. Land and natural resources fueled that conflict. It is therefore important that as Liberians decide the direction of our country on October 10, we are reminded about the role land and natural resources played in our conflict.In the last eleven years, despite improvement in legislations that provide protection to customary land and property rights, the Government of Liberia has failed to guarantee the free, prior and informed consent of communities, especially women depending on land and natural resources  affected by large-scale land development, violating not only the rights of community members to control and manage the land they directly cultivate but the broader territory inclusive of natural resources, medicinal plants, hunting grounds, fishing grounds, rivers, streams, shrines, sacred sites and other forest resources.The rights of communities to land and natural resources, especially women depending on land and natural resources, are fundamental in securing the set of rights related to livelihood, culture, self-identification, self-management and the right to determine their own priorities for development. This means that if communities have control over development affecting them and their lands and resources, they will be able to maintain and strengthen their institutions and promote their development in accordance with their aspirations and needs.The lack of community participation in the granting of large-scale concessions over ancestral and/or traditionally-held lands has led to resource-based violence across many agriculture, forestry and mining concessions, leading to heightened tension between community members and concession holders on the one hand and community members and government on the other. This is also worsening the poverty situation of marginal and vulnerable forest-dependent peoples, mostly women, in the rural areas. The results have included the intimidation, arrest, torture and detention of human rights defenders of land and natural resources in Liberia by government and concession holders.The problems In late September of 2016, the Natural Resources Women Platform with support from Green Advocates launched a report, “Women: The Least Secure Tenure: Assessing the impacts of large-scale land acquisitions on women’s tenure rights in Liberia.” The report through series of cross case analyses focused on women’s tenure rights in natural resources, where it found that even though women are the primary users of natural resources, their tenure rights are much less secure than men. Per the report, women’s situation and circumstances is further made even more tenuous where large scale land development is imposed on local communities thereby extinguishing most rights and privileges women may have had under customary tenure, pushing them beyond even marginal lands.The report detailed disturbing rights violations and documented how women human rights defenders protesting the grabbing of their customary lands have faced threats, arrests and imprisonment as well as series of criminal charges and offenses. It notes that “the lack of gender considerations in working conditions and practices was outstanding and had deterred women from much needed access to productive work relegating women to the background with little recognition of women as important and equal stakeholders in decision making over the use (or disposal), management and control of land and natural resources.”The report established how the “loss of land, forests and water resources had affected women in their reproductive, productive and community management roles” concluding that “women can be considered less fortunate because in the context of natural resources they hold the least secure tenure.”Reversing insecurity of tenure for women, especially women depending on land and natural resources in Liberia, is a humongous task. This is because in Liberia, women’s insecurity of tenure has been informed and entrenched by centuries of taboos, traditions and customary practices often reinforced by supernatural beliefs.Partial View of women participants at the Participatory Rural Appraisal-Darbu TownIt is these traditions and archaic superstitious beliefs that have held hostage the rights of women to land and property rights in Liberia. This is what must be unpackaged to secure women’s customary land and property rights not just in Liberia but perhaps globally.The Wologizi Mountain range -the Failed attempts to secretly award it and the political falloutsOne of the five case study areas, that the Natural Resources Women Platform, carried out its field investigation to assess the impact of large scale concession land development that informed the report, “Women the Least Secure Tenure,” was among Wologizi communities in Lofa County.This case study location was selected because it had not experienced large scale land concession development and customary practices were very much intact.Wologizi therefore provided a potential not just because it would contribute to the establishment of a robust and informed community institution to ensure the recognition and protection of collective rights to land and resources, but that it was also an important study area to observe the interplay of how centuries of taboos, traditions and customary practices are serving as barriers and impediments to securing women’s customary land and property rights in Liberia.It remains one of Liberia’s traditional communities where community members have customary ways of recognizing land and resource rights of individual members or households, the collective rights to self-determination, cultural integrity and development. Community members have traditionally occupied and owned the land and resources in Wologizi, which was inherited from their ancestors.For community members, it is the traditional occupation and use which is the basis for establishing community land rights and self-identification as well as maintaining and strengthening collective rights to land and natural resources.There have already been two failed attempts to grant out the mountain range as a concession. The Government of Liberia, in 2013, tried to secretly award Wologizi to Jindal Steel & Power Limited, and the recent row to secretly award Wologizi to Sable Mining Company by changing Liberia’s procurement law.Deconstructing the Insecurity of Tenure- A robust and participatory local institution In late April of 2017, the Natural Resources Women Platform in partnership with Green Advocates embarked on a process of contributing to addressing the issues of security of tenure through the establishment of a robust and informed community institution to ensure the recognition and protection of collective rights to land and resources by local communities and indigenous people inhabiting the Wologizi mountain range already earmarked for expansion of concessions in Liberia.In May of 2017, the Natural Resource Women Platform (NRWP) joined by Green Advocates and their county-based partner organization, conducted six participatory rural appraisal (PRA) workshops in six project targeted communities surrounding the Wologizi mountain range.During the PRA, the women platform focused on facilitating women’s leadership and representation in the current and future governing institutions associated with the management of land and natural resources located within the Wologizi mountain range and the surrounding communities.Legal and policy experts working with the women platform and Green Advocates recommended that by utilizing the Community Rights Law, the Land Rights Policy and the Draft Land Rights Act, a robust, gender focused, informed and resilient community based institution would be expected to serve as a preventive measure against the violation of community rights while empowering community members to increase their control and management of their land and natural resources and put them in the driver seat of their own development and priorities.This approach seems to be a material paradigm shift from current approaches to protecting collective land rights. For example, over the past years, civil society organizations and their local community partners have assisted local communities to demand their rights in land areas already occupied by large-scale concessions.Community members have succeeded in slowing down, delaying and in some instances holding back the monstrous pace of large-scale concessions development in Liberia. In some instances, the Government of Liberia publicly admitted that there were errors in awarding concessions outside community consent, promising to consult communities in decision making over future concessions.However, despite the public admissions of error and blunder in awarding concessions, reversing such concessions to recognize and respect collective rights to land and natural resources, restore sacred sites and damaged water systems has been slow and difficult.Challenges associated with facilitating women leadership and representation on customary governance institution  The Women Platform and Green Advocates researchers organized and divided the six communities into two working groups based on the geographic locations around the Wologizi range as well as the demographic characteristics of each of the six communities. Group one engaged Wobeyanmai, Beideyeziba and Karzah, while group two engaged with Dabu, Kpademai and Betibah.The team conducted the research in a way that allowed all field assistants, researchers and community participants to benefit from an improved understanding and shared experience of the methodology of the workshop. The entire team participated in facilitating the first research workshop held in Beideyeziba, which gave everyone on the team a better understanding of the design of the workshop, the composition of the participants and the facilitation and/or presentation processes.The team was divided into their respective groups ensuring that there was at least one female researcher on each of the two working groups as well as at least two female participants from each of the communities, a timetable developed with topics and timeframes for presentation.Given the sensitivities surrounding women participation, the Women Platform made extra efforts to ensure that at least two women were selected to form part of the participants from each of the communities. As an additional safeguard, the participatory mapping training workshop was organized outside of the six communities in the municipal capital of Lofa county, Voinjama city.Preliminary findings Women participants invited from all six communities that participated in the workshop including the three other women participants from neighboring towns (Jenneh, Gondorla and Wanlema) that were invited to the Darbu workshop had no idea as to how land is owned by their communities or the commitments or rights their customary leaders have granted outsiders to their land and resources.All the women participants had no knowledge that benefits or social contributions were being given to their leaders as compensation by strangers as rights to live on, use, access or harvest resources from their land.Even though women had knowledge about the existence of traditional governance institutions, they were, however, rarely consulted or encouraged to participate in natural resources decision making processes, except in situations concerning domestic complaints or dispute resolution processes.In all the six communities, community leaders included women as participants, though women were afraid to ask or respond to questions because of traditions that have existed over the years in their communities restricting women from speaking or making any decision in meetings related to their communities.As the various workshops made progress, it became clear that traditional, customary, taboos and superstitious belief practices by communities around the Wologizi Mountain had created obstacles which were serving as barriers to women participation and impeding women’s performance during discussions at the workshops in the six communities.Breaking away from customary practices, traditions and taboos Women were observing centuries of customary practices and taboos that prevented them from speaking or making decisions when men are present. In the towns of Beduiyeziba and Wobeyanmai, when women were directly asked by the facilitator to give feedbacks on laws being presented during the workshop, not a single woman spoke up or could say a word – it was voiced by elders of the town that women are to remain quiet during meetings.It was a queer moment with an eerie feeling as the room was so quiet, that the participants could hear the rustle of the leaves against the branches of the trees surrounding the workshop room.It took a delicate negotiation with the elders and chiefs as well as an affirmative gender based balancing act by the women platform to break the ice permitting the women participants to talk in the presence of their men.A woman participant breaking away from taboos and tradition during the mapping training session in Bet bahAfter the elders and chiefs consented, the women who had been quiet began participating and asking questions. The chief Zoe of Wobeyamai Town (Zita Kolubah- not her real name) said she’s happy about all the good laws that give communities rights to the land and resources they have resided and owned for so many years.Lorpu Midi (not her real name) said she worked for Firestone Rubber Plantation Company when workers were paid 10 cents and later 20 cents. She inquired “whether monetary value is attached to the land demarcation that the community’s representatives will be trained to map” She inquired “my reason for asking this question is we gave money to some surveyor for the demarcation of our land to allow the community obtain deed for the land. Since the transaction, we have not gotten the deed to our land.”Another woman participant inquired “whether the organizers will support and defend the Wobeyanmai Community.” Musu sumo (not her real name ), a woman participant from Wobeyanmai Town, said that women have not had the opportunity to make decisions or point out things moving in the right direction only because “our men believe that women are not able to make any positive change in society.” An elderly woman asked “what will be the cost of suing the government in a case where they violate the rights of a community?”A young woman participant inquired “with common boundaries between communities around the Wologizi Mountain, if one community has investment into their community and the investors cross the boundary into the next community what should the community do?” Another woman from the town of Gondorla asked what “if a company is allowed to harvest timber in a community but the community later observed the company extracting iron ore, what should be done by the community?”A woman participant from Darbu Town asked “if a company operation requires the community to relocate to another community what should be the community’s reaction?” Finally, an elderly woman from Darbu Town asked “Do I have the authority to extract gold and diamond from my community since the land and resources on the land are owned by my community?”The workshop was all of a sudden alive and the women, all smiling and joyful, were asking questions one after another. It was a sigh of relief and its seems a huge burden had been lifted.The workshop facilitators and field research assistants from Monrovia could not believe the depth and level of knowledge, expertise and experience flowing from out of the questions and queries of these women.All of a sudden, it was like a scene in a marketplace and the chit chat of these women took over the room like a storm as the men watched and observed in amazement, and probably dumb founded that their women participants could ask such intelligent and informed questions.Navigating the taboos, traditions and customary practices that serve as barriers to securing women customary land and property rights The various questions and inquiries were a shocking reminder of how taboos, traditions and superstitious beliefs among communities around the Wologizi Mountain had created an obstacle of grading women’s performance during discussions at the workshops in the six communities.Thus, it was recommended by the Natural Resource Women Platform that men give their women power and authority participate in all future community meetings.The Women Platform took extra time to explain to all participants why it was important for men to understand women have rights and form a cardinal part of the issues around land and resources, especially since woman even use the land and natural resources more than men.To conclude, in a campaign designed to establish a robust and informed community institution, especially if the goal is to also facilitate and enable women leadership and representation, development experts, field researchers and activists must be able to navigate the taboos, traditions, superstitious beliefs and customary practices that serves as barriers and impediments to securing women’s customary land and property rights.It is therefore important that as Liberians decide the direction of our country on October 10, we are not only reminded about the role land and natural resources played in our conflict, but much more important our mothers, sisters, daughters, grandmothers, and wives.We must commit to unshackle centuries of taboos and traditions that have held them as unequal to men and guarantee them equal rights to land and natural resources.[1]http://www.forestpeoples.org/sites/fpp/files/news/2012/10/Final%20complaint%20to%20%20RSPO%20on%20Golden%20Veroleum-%20Butaw-sinoe%20county%20(2).pdf[2]http://rightsandresources.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Power-Potential-Liberia-Case-Study-1.pdf[3]http://inchrliberia.com/images/ButawRiotReport.pdf[5]https://www.liberianobserver.com/news/human-rights-violations-unacceptable/Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more


Tag: 419上海约会

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesMauricio Pochettino said he took off Heung-Min Son while he was on a hat-trick because the forward needed a rest.Son scored his second double in two games to sink Huddersfield 2-0 at Wembley and cement Tottenham’s place in the top four.“In the last few games he played a lot. He played one hour and scored twice against Rochdale on a very cold day,” the Spurs boss said.“Today he played another 70 minutes, and he’s not a machine, and he needs to rest. There are a lot of games ahead of him.“But he is one player you always expect amazing things from. He is talented, consistent and very professional.“Players like him and Harry Kane work a lot and it pays back. He’s another example at our club of what it means to be professional.”Pochettino’s side face Juventus next in a huge Champions League last-16 second leg at Wembley on Tuesday night.And he said: “I am happy for Son because these two goals help a very good position in the table now, and in the battle for the top four. It was a very professional performance from the team.“We are focused on Juventus now. With Chelsea, United still to play, cannot affect what happens in the other games.” Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebookby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksRecommended for youAspireAbove.comRemember Pauley Perrette? Try Not To Smile When You See Her NowAspireAbove.comUndoLifestly.com25 Celebs You Didn’t Realize Are Gay – No. 8 Will Surprise WomenLifestly.comUndoUsed Cars | Search AdsUsed Cars in Tuen Mun Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkUsed Cars | Search AdsUndoTopCars15 Ugliest Cars Ever MadeTopCarsUndoezzin.com20 Breathtaking Places to See Before You Dieezzin.comUndoFood World Magazine15 Fruits that Burn Fat Like CrazyFood World MagazineUndoDrhealth35 Foods That Should Never Be Placed in the RefrigeratorDrhealthUndoHappyTricks.comHer House Always Smells Amazing – Try her Unique Trick!HappyTricks.comUndolast_img read more


Tag: 419上海约会

first_imgThe old paradigm: lactic acid buildup during exercise is like poison to your muscles, producing stiffness and agony.  The new paradigm: lactic acid is your friend, a fuel additive that helps keep your mitochondrial motors in top-notch condition.  Read all about it in a press release from UC Berkeley.What are you waiting for?  It’s spring, it’s beautiful outside, life is good – go feel the burn and bulk up those amazing electrical motors (02/13/2004) in your mitochondrial power plants.  The stronger they get, the better you will feel the next time you challenge your body and explore creation.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img


Tag: 419上海约会

first_img7 February 2012While sipping on bottled water has become something of a lifestyle statement, a survey has revealed that most South Africans are happy with the high quality water that comes straight from their taps.The survey, conducted by the Water Research Commission and South African Local Government Association between March and May 2011, investigated urban South Africans’ perceptions of the quality of their water and the factors that influence these perceptions.It found that 81 percent of urban South Africans from all income levels perceive their tap water to be safe to drink. This concurs with international studies which found that most people in countries with a reliable water supply perceived tap water as having a low safety risk.South African water institutions are considered to provide some of the highest quality of drinking or potable water in the world.The survey covered adults aged 16 years and older from all race groups. A random sample of 2 437 urban households was drawn.Younger people more positiveThe study also found that women were significantly less confident about the safety of tap water than men. Women were also more likely than men to boil or filter drinking water, and more inclined than men to drink only bottled water.Younger people between the ages of 16 and 34 were more positive about the safety of drinking water than older people.Consumers in the metro municipalities perceived their tap water to be significantly safer to drink than consumers in other urban municipalities.Consumers in eThekwini Metro (Durban) had the highest consumer confidence in the safety of their tap water, whereas consumers in Mangaung Metro (Bloemfontein) had the least confidence.Consumers of non-metro municipalities in the Northern Cape, Eastern Cape, Free State and Mpumalanga provinces had the lowest confidence in the safety of their tap water.Factors influencing perceptionsThere was a wide range of factors which determined consumers’ perceptions about the safety of drinking water, the main ones being the appearance of the water, its taste and smell, and people’s bodily reactions to it.A very small percentage of the population based their perception of the safety of tap water on what they heard or read in the media.The leader of the survey, Dr Sarah Slabbert, said: “Although the scope of this study was small, it provides a baseline within which to compare future studies.“It also gives the water sector and its stakeholders an understanding of how South Africans perceive the quality of drinking water. The findings have several implications for policy, management and further research.”The director for water use and waste management at the Water Research Commission, Jay Bhagwan, said the perception that tap water was clean and safe to drink and regularly tested was a major indicator of good municipal service.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more


Tag: 419上海约会

first_img26 June 2014Local Umhlanga surfer Beyrick De Vries is counting the days until some 84 international surfers arrive to compete at one of his local breaks in the Association of Surfing Professionals’ (ASP) Mr Price Pro Ballito from 30 June to 6 July.It will be a dream come true for De Vries, who hopes to follow in the footsteps of elite ASP World Tour athletes and fellow Durban surfers Jordy Smith and Travis Logie.‘A blessing’“It is such a blessing for the South African surfers to have an event like the Mr Price Pro Ballito in our country,” De Vries said. “The event offers double the prize money and ratings points of other star-rated Qualifying Series stops, so it’s a real foot in the door for those of us wanting to make it on the international stage.”Rated 28th on the ASP Qualification Series (QS) rankings, De Vries has climbed almost 100 places up the ratings ladder since this time last year, making him a firm favourite to not only bring the trophy back to South Africa, but also to gain further ground towards qualifying for the 2015 ASP World Tour.‘Really important’“The Mr Price Pro is really important for me to further my rankings,” he said. “Last year I reached the Round of 16 here and after a disappointing result in Mexico this week (De Vries was eliminated in round two), I will be looking to make up some lost ground at this event.”Competing in the familiar waves of Ballito, just 20 minutes away from his home, is an advantage that few surfers are afforded, so it is one De Vries wants to make the most of while he has the chance.Competing at home“I can’t even explain how much of an impact competing at home has on your surfing. It’s the opportunity to compete without the stress of travel, jet lag or finding the right nutrition and all the other factors you have worry about when you are overseas.“I surf the way I am feeling and, at the end of the day, it all comes down to confidence. That’s how my surfing comes out. I perform my best when the stress is off.”De Vries said he was proud to call the KwaDukuza region home and enjoyed giving his fellow international rivals a warm African welcome.‘They love Ballito’“It is epic to have the world’s best surfers in Ballito because I know how fun home is, how good the waves are and how rich the culture is. They love Ballito, and it’s great to have one of their favourite destinations be the one you call home.”A fierce competitor with no shortage of variety and flair in his repertoire, De Vries says working with his new shaper, Elton Fursman of Hurricane Surfboards, has given him a fresh approach and was the move he hoped would take his surfing to the next level.“It’s really important for me to work closely with my shaper. When my previous shaper Clayton moved to Australia at the start of the year, I started working with Elton. Hurricane are 100 percent behind me achieving my dream of qualifying for the World Championship Tour.”Podium dreamA top-three finish at the Mr Price Pro Ballito could make all the difference in De Vries’ campaign, which means he will have his sights set on the podium from the moment he hits the water in round one on Monday.“I will not rest until I win the Mr Price Pro Ballito. This is the event I have my heart set on,” he said.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more


Tag: 419上海约会

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Today, the American Tree Farm System (ATFS) announced the 2018 National Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year. This year’s honorees are Randy and Koral Clum of east central Ohio. The Clums have been sustainably managing Hepatica Falls Tree Farm, their 152-acre certified forestland in southwestern Harrison County, since they purchased the property in 1993.While Randy and Koral Clum had spent much of their careers in forestry, they hadn’t managed their own property until they acquired their tree farm. Since then, they’ve been dedicated to creating a working forest that produces high-quality timber while managing for water, wildlife and recreation, as well as using their woodland to educate others about the benefits of the forest and good management principles.“It’s an amazing honor and I feel blessed to have worked with all the people that we’ve worked with. We are honored to be recognized in this way,” Koral Clum said.Randy Clum added, “What’s been important to us about the American Tree Farm System is the education component. It’s a way to meet other tree farmers, to expand their knowledge, to expose them to bigger and better things, and to what other tree farmers have been doing for the last few decades. It’s good principles. It’s good standards. It’s what tree farming’s all about, clean air, clean water, timber, recreation, aesthetics all rolled into one package.”Randy and Koral Clum are frequent speakers on forest management during seminars, field days, and other educational workshops. The couple also has served on numerous advisory boards and held officer positions for organizations such as Ohio Society of American Foresters, Ohio Tree Farm Committee, Ohio Farm Bureau, and the East Central Ohio Forestry Association. Sharing their love of forestry has grown over the years, and recently Randy has adopted social media to engage and educate others who want to know more about family forest ownership and best management practices.“The Clums are model landowners who have done great work on their land, for sustainable wood, clean water, improved wildlife habitat, and recreation,” said Tom Martin, President and CEO of the American Forest Foundation, the non-profit conservation group that manages the American Tree Farm System. “Randy and Koral have been terrific stewards of their land and have also taken that a step further to reach out to their neighbors and their community to all work together to make our forests healthier. This type of sharing and education is a key value of ATFS.”The Clums were nominated for the award by Jeremy Scherf, Service Forester for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry and 2016 National Tree Farm Inspector of the Year.“Hepatica Falls Tree Farm is one of the best managed properties around. So, when you think of forestry in Ohio, it’s hard not to think of Randy and Koral Clum. While they are foresters by profession, they are generous educators at heart,” Scherf said. “The Clums volunteer a lot of their time to educate others about forestry, both locally and statewide. The countless hours they spend donating their time to help teach others about our forests is remarkable.”Managing their land for timber sales, the Clums have adhered to the high standards of ATFS certification. This requires tree selection with consideration for forest health, spacing, risk, markets, aesthetics, wildlife, and long-term productivity. These best management practices and their love of the land have ensured erosion control near Stillwater Creek and they have protected and improved habitat for many wildlife species, including bobcat, coyote, river otter, deer, spring peepers, wild turkey, ruffed grouse, wood duck, turkey vulture, red-tailed hawk, pileated woodpecker, woodcock, barred owl, kingfisher, wren, towhee, scarlet tanager, goldfinch, hummingbird, and Louisiana water thrush.“Some people feel that cutting trees is hard on the wildlife, but in this part of Ohio, the missing component for a lot of wildlife is the early successional forest, the young trees,” Koral said. “We also leave cavity trees for birds, squirrels and other species.”Each year, ATFS recognizes four Regional Outstanding Tree Farmers out of the 73,000 Tree Farmers nationwide. This year, ATFS is proud to also recognize the regional awardees: Russell Black from Maine; Jon and Carol Gould from Florida; and Dan Kingsbury from Washington, along with the Clums.“Our past timber sales have been a blessing from the standpoint of creating more diversity as far as food and habitat. It has introduced so much diversity with edge effect and young successional stage for so many different species of not only animals, but also bird species, insects—pollinators. It just worked out better than we ever imagined,” Randy said.Individuals considered for the award must demonstrate exceptional efforts to preserve and enhance their woodlands, which conserves and enhances clean water and air, wildlife habitat, recreational activities, and the wood for homes and paper products that come from their land, all of which are exemplified on the ATFS sign.To learn more about the 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year, visit: https://www.forestfoundation.org/2018-outstanding-tree-farmers .last_img read more


Tag: 419上海约会

first_imgThe National Green Tribunal (NGT) on Monday directed the Uttar Pradesh government to seal hand pumps in the Sambhal district where contaminated water was being extracted. Further, the green panel has directed authorities to submit a comprehensive plan of water supply in the district.‘Supply potable water’ A Bench headed by acting chairperson U.D. Salvi directed authorities to provide potable water to the Sambhal residents after it was alleged that contaminated water was being supplied.The green panel was hearing a petition by advocate Gaurav Bansal who alleged that a survey of around 20 villages had shown that children were being forced to have contaminated water.last_img