Walorski looks to partner with ND

Tag: 百花丛官方地址

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the first in a two-part series featuring two candidates vying to represent Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District. Across the country, Republicans are challenging Democratic incumbents to gain control of the U.S. House of Representatives. The race for Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District is no different. Republican candidate Jackie Walorski is running against Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly, who has held his position for the last four years. It has been highlighted in the media as one of the nation’s most contested races. Walorski told The Observer she would look to the University as a potential partner to her if she were elected. She specifically commended the University’s focus on research and said it would be an asset to the district she would serve. “The research dollars, the things that have happened in this place, not only produce a great community for us, but a great alum community around the world,” she said. Walorski previously worked as a local reporter, and she said this exposed her to various research initiatives that are now coming to life at the University. “Things that they were looking for are now a reality. So this is the paramount issue for me,” she said. Walorski said in terms of her economic platform, the country must control spending, which will especially impact recent college graduates in search for employment. She said her time serving the Indiana state legislature has prepared her to do it on a more broad level. “What we have done in these past six years is melted down our size of government, all aimed at protecting the taxpayer,” Walorski said. “That has to be done as a foundational measure at the federal government in order for [students] to have a job when they get out of here.” Walorski said she would propose the 2011 budget be frozen in order for the president to audit agencies and cut back on duplicative efforts. She said trimming bureaucracy would help the job market. “If we create a level of certainty at the federal level where they know there is not going to be mandates coming down, that the next shoe is going to drop, we will see a flexibility of the market where people are hiring,” Walorski said. In terms of recent health care reform, Walorski said one of the most popular aspects crossing party lines particularly applies to college students. “I think the issue of being able to carry kids until they are 26 is probably the most popular part of the whole program,” she said. “I have heard from Republicans and Democrats and Independents alike that because the job market is so tight they like the security of being able to carry college graduates until they are 26.” Walorski did say that despite that particular aspect of the health care bill, more steps are needed to control medical litigation and damages, otherwise known as tort reform. Walorski also said education represents an extremely important part of her political platform. She said one thing that needs to be changed is how much responsibility teachers are being charged with. “We are shoving an unbelievable burden on teachers because of the breakdown of the family [and] because of our culture changing,” Walorski said. “Teachers are responsible for, in many cases, the kids more than the parents are and they are responsible for an unbelievable amount of teaching, not just curriculum.” Walorski also said the No Child Left Behind Act has created problems in the educational system by complicating funding for schools, which is controlled by each state. She said rectifying this issue is extremely important. “The money needs to be driven into the classrooms, not the administrators,” Walorski said. Walorski also said she has taken a strong stance on the issue of abortion, which is of particular importance to the Notre Dame community, noting in the past she has worked to de-fund pro-choice institutions. “The battle that is raging, the reason that people are so angry, is because we are talking about a tax supported industry. I’ve stood up to Planned Parenthood to de-fund them,” she said. “I don’t believe we should force anyone who does not believe in it to pay for it.” On the issue of the United States’ military presence in the Middle East, Walorski said the safety of the troops and the decision making of military personnel should guide government decisions in respect to the area. “I think that one of the biggest mistakes that happens in this country is that we as adult voters have allowed this government to evolve into this thing where bureaucrats make military calls,” she said. “Military calls need to come from the generals on the ground that we trust the president to put there.” Walorski said she felt military presence in the area impacts the everyday safety of American citizens, and therefore is an issue that must be addressed in an appropriate manner. “The number one job of the president of the United States is to protect the United States of America from foreign invasion and threat of domestic assault inside,” she said. “I don’t see how you skirt that when you have generals on the ground saying we are still not able to walk away from Afghanistan.” Overall, Walorski said the progress of her campaign so far makes her confident for the results Nov. 2. She said the unique nature of her campaign has allowed her to communicate her platforms successfully. “I’m as blue collar as they come. I’m self funding, it’s a real grass-roots race,” she said. “We have done a good job of getting our message out.” Despite any political differences Walorski and Donnelly may hold, they do share a common devotion to the Fighting Irish football team. “I’m a Notre Dame fan, and very, very grateful that Kelly is here as a coach,” she said. The second part of this series will feature Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly. It will run it tomorrow’s Observer.last_img read more


Tag: 百花丛官方地址

first_img John Guare’s unforgettable 1990 play Six Degrees of Separation is returning to the Great White Way. Emmy winner Allison Janney and Tony winner John Benjamin Hickey will headline the revival alongside Straight Outta Compton’s Corey Hawkins. Inspired by a true story, the play follows the trail of a mysterious young con man who insinuates himself into the lives of a wealthy New York couple. After a shocking surprise, the couple tries to piece together the connections that brought him into their world. Trip Cullman directs the production, which begins performances on April 5 and opens on April 25 at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. Take a look at Broadway.com’s hot shots of the cast and creative team, and be sure to see Six Degrees of Separation through July 16. John Benjamin Hickey, Allison Janney & Corey Hawkins(Photo: Caitlin McNaney) View Commentslast_img read more


Tag: 百花丛官方地址

first_imgIf those had been “ordinary” politicians – social democrats or earnest liberals – they would have been run out of office by disappointed supporters who voted for efficient and effective government.But Chávez remained in power for 14 years before dying in office;his successor is still there.In Austria, the resurgent Freedom Party has just joined a new government coalition.Orban has been Hungary’s prime minister for nearly eight years, and Law and Justice’s support seems to be holding steady in Poland.Some of these stories are really about authoritarianism:Many populist leaders are actually anti-pluralist leaders, and they change the rules of their democracies to make it more difficult for their opponents to win.But another factor is at work as well. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe charges range widely, from relatively trivial abuses of privilege to completely unprecedented breaches of ethical laws and norms.The president and his son-in-law may be using American foreign policy to enrich themselves.Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has broken rules to fly first-class. Foreign delegations routinely book rooms at Trump’s Washington hotel to please and enrich the president.Corruption and nepotism have both reached new levels in this White House, as everyone who knew Donald Trump predicted, and as many who voted for him will ignore.Every time one of these stories breaks, there is a routine response:Is this what working-class Americans really wanted when they voted for an “anti-elitist”?Is this what the Midwest meant when it cheered calls to “drain the swamp”?But if history and precedent are any guide, then these abuses of power won’t matter to them at all.Our hemisphere contains ample precedents. But the spectacular corruption of so-called anti-elitist elites has another effect in the longer term:It makes people cynical about politics altogether.I recently asked one of Orban’s opponents why the endless revelations of crooked contracts don’t create an overwhelming majority for the opposition. Because voters now think everyone is corrupt,” he told me. “They’ve got used to it.”As the nepotism and the cronyism of this White House begin to sink in, Americans may not turn against Trump.They may turn against politics, or even democracy, altogether.Anne Applebaum writes a weekly foreign affairs column for The Washington Post. Unlike social democrats or earnest liberals, these politicians were never trying to appeal to the good sense of voters, they were never selling efficiency and effectiveness, and their voters don’t expect it from them.In a recent speech, Orban declared that Western Europe had caused the “decline of Christian culture,” and he described Hungary as “the last bastion of Christianity.”If you are emotionally moved by that declaration, why should you care if his son-in-law is getting rich?The political scientist Jan-Werner Muller has also written that corruption and cronyism aren’t a problem for this kind of leader “as long as they look like measures pursued for the sake of a moral, hardworking ‘us’ and not for the immoral or even foreign ‘them.’ “These same instincts might shield Trump from the wrath of some his voters.If you really believe that American civilization is in decline and only the Trump administration can halt it, then you won’t care that Jared Kushner is massaging America’s Middle Eastern policy to suit his business interests.If the “Forgotten Man” of Middle America believes Trump is battling invisible Islamist extremists (or overly visible television talk-show hosts), then they might not care that the Chinese government granted Ivanka Trump some valuable trademarks on the day President Xi Jinping met her father. Latin American history is strewn with “men of the people” who rode anti-elitist sentiments to power and then used that power to enrich themselves and their friends.The former Venezuelan dictator-president Hugo Chávez won office on an “anti-corruption” ticket and then proceeded to rob the state on a massive scale, using government contracts to keep friendly business executives on board, turning the civil service and the state oil company into machines for rewarding supporters, even buying a luxurious plane from the ruling family of Qatar for his own use.Europe contains similar stories.During its previous turn in power, Austria’s “populist” Freedom Party proved far more corrupt than the mainstream politicians it had denounced while out of office.After his death,it emerged that the party’s leader, Joerg Haider – more famous for his nods and winks to Austria’s Nazi legacy – was doing shady deals from Libya to the Balkans and beyond.Viktor Orban, the “populist” Hungarian prime minister who won in 2010 by denouncing the corruption of his opponents, has since directed European Union funding to business executives who support his party (among them a childhood friend), and helped to enrich numerous relatives, above all his son-in-law. (Sound familiar?)Poland’s ruling Law and Justice party also ran an anti-elitist election campaign in 2015 and has spent two years populating the civil service with friends, cousins, nephews and uncles of politicians. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more