In Awake of Ebola Liberian Shines on Int’l Stage

Tag: 白山楼凤

first_imgDespite Liberia being badly hit by Ebola and its citizens placed under international spotlight because of the disease, a citizen of the land is busy flying the flag high on the international stage.Alfred H. Wreh, a Liberian currently pursuing post graduate studies at the University of Queensland, Australia, has been nominated to participate in the global International Society for Industrial Ecology Student Chapter Board Election.The Liberian scholar, according to reports, is the first ever, and only African amongst colleagues from Brazil, Germany, Switzerland, China, USA, Hong Kong, Norway, South Korea, USA, Austria and others to be selected to that portfolio.According to a dispatch from Australia, the Student Chapter Board president, Xiao Li, expressed delight in the nominees and encouraged them to be prepared for the challenges ahead.He disclosed that the Student Chapter nominees will serve a term of two years. Li averred that the society is interested in increasing the representation of students from outside North America and Europe.  He said he  is well pleased with the current composition.For his part, Wreh said hailing from a natural resource-rich country devastated by 14 years of conflict, and representing the chapter of one of the world’s best universities was a dream come true.  He noted that the International Society for Industrial Ecology has always been a radical and powerful force for change; an inspirational source of ideas and an innovation which requires companies to ensure that  cleaner production, best practices and standards are upheld.Wreh stated: “Its farsighted founder imbued the Society with a sense of purpose not only to encourage innovativeness, broaden learning, cultivate students’ skills and ensure that industries production and profitability is enhanced; but to ensure our actions globally will improve industries’ overall sustainability, alleviate poverty and provide better services while managing the world’s resources.“I share a common set of values which commits us to rising to the challenges of the social and economic crisis facing  Africa and the world at large.  These challenges can be met through activities which help to regain and boost our quest for a “sustainable” world by alleviating the plight of the vulnerable sections of our society today. We remain committed to the principles of finding innovative solutions to complicated environmental problems, while facilitating  communication among scientists, engineers, policymakers, managers and environmental advocates whose work interest focuses on finding a balance between environmental and economic actions.”The Liberian told over 700 global students that as a candidate, the first African to be nominated since the Society’s founding, he brings the African experience, which fulfils the society’s global commitment.  Wreh reminded the world of the great potentials in Liberians across the globe, stressing that the presence of the Ebola virus in his country does not call for neglect or isolating citizens of the continent’s oldest independent nation.Mr. Alfred H. Wreh, a Liberian Pursuing Postgraduate studies specifically in  Environmental Management,  majoring in Natural Resources at the University of Queensland in Australia, was  nominated on September 30, 2014 by his university student chapter for election pending a vetting process by the society board.   The vetting process was concluded on October 11, 2014.The candidates elected will immediately begin work and will join the organization of the 4th Symposium on Industrial Ecology for Young Professionals (SIEYP IV) at the Biannual ISIE Conference in Surrey, UK, July 2015.The International Society for Industrial Ecology, with offices at Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, promotes industrial ecology as a way of finding innovative solutions to complicated environmental problems.   The Society facilitates communication among scientists, engineers, policymakers, managers and advocates who are interested in better integrating environmental concerns with economic activities.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more


Tag: 白山楼凤

first_imgLieber’s colleagues in the Legislature saw things differently. Assembly Speaker Fabian Nu ez, D-Los Angeles, believed it made the Legislature look out of touch at a time he’s trying to boost its public image. Lieber encountered similar resistance from other lawmakers. A spokesman for Nu ez said the speaker was pleased Lieber narrowed the focus of her bill. “She made it more palatable, and the speaker spoke to her several times about doing that,” the spokesman, Steve Maviglio, said. “And she was wise enough to listen to the reaction.” Lieber said the proposal would have provided clarity in the law about what type of parental discipline is allowed. mzapler@mercurynews.com (916) 441-4603160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SACRAMENTO – In the end, Sally Lieber’s proposal got spanked. After a month of nationwide publicity and much ridicule, the Mountain View assemblywoman on Thursday dropped her idea to criminalize spanking young children, bowing to opposition from fellow lawmakers who worried it made the state Legislature look kooky. “The votes simply were not there,” a disappointed Lieber said at a news conference. Lieber instead introduced a watered-down bill that would prohibit other types of physical punishment, such as using a belt, stick, extension cord or other instrument on a child or vigorously shaking a baby under age 3. But a swat on the behind will continue to be legal, so long as it doesn’t cause serious injury. Lieber’s announcement ends a whirlwind ride for the 45-year-old Democratic lawmaker, whose idea last month sparked an outcry among parents and became irresistible fodder for late-night comedy shows. She fielded more than 60 interview requests from media outlets across the country about a proposal that never was actually introduced as legislation. Lieber insisted through the end that the criticism and mockery didn’t bother her. “We have welcomed the publicity around the bill, including the negative publicity,” Lieber said. “We want to get people talking about it.” She certainly accomplished that. A MediaNews story describing her idea to make it a misdemeanor to spank kids age 3 and younger sparked more than a thousand online comments. Even though people overwhelmingly opposed the idea – saying they resented a politician, especially one without children, telling them how to raise their kids – it sparked a debate at water coolers and dinner tables. With all the publicity, “many people we’ve talked to already think the Legislature has passed a ban on spanking,” Lieber said. “And that’s just fine with us, because we would like to stop all physical punishment of children.” last_img read more