Standing tall: Paul Francis shares his story of courage

Tag: 爱上海同城对对碰验证

first_imgDania Bogle, Senior Gleaner Writer FANS OF athletics may have heard the name Paul Francis as the master strategist behind Jamaica’s gold medal in the women’s 4x400m at the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships in Beijing, last August. Others know him as the younger brother of MVP Track and Field Club head coach, Stephen Francis and one of the club’s founders. Athletes at the University of Technology (UTech) know Francis as head coach of the women’s track team and for four years between 2010 and 2014 their classmate. Francis was 44 years old when he decided to go back to university. He had started in the 1980s at the University of the West Indies and dropped out after a year. He was accepted to do a degree in Business Administration at UTech in 2005 and opted out; but on February 2, 2010, what started out as a minor car accident, would change Francis’ life forever. While travelling on Highway 2000, he had a minor accident and when he left the vehicle to inspect the damage, was hit by a passing car which crushed his right leg. That exacerbated an injury Francis had suffered in 2008. “One day after training, I was fooling around on the track with a football and twisted my ankle and it just …broke. So I was walking around with a noticeable limp from two years before,” Francis told The Gleaner. After three weeks in hospital he was told his leg had developed an infection, and would have to be amputated. Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association president, Dr Warren Blake, one of the island’s most noted orthopaedic surgeons, conducted the operation. “Of course, I would have felt a deep remorse on hearing that I would have had to lose half of one of my legs and like any normal human being, I buss a bawl,” he shared. NO LOOKING BACK “After that bawl, never again have I looked back and regretted or thought that I am disadvantaged because I have a disability.” Francis, an IAAF Level IV certified sprint and hurdles coach, and Area Technical Official, was fitted with a prosthetic leg that August. The amputation made him reevaluate his position. “I did not see myself being able to demonstrate a high knee drill or a start to any athlete, and I thought that would somehow reduce my premium as a coach, and I thought it would be an excellent idea to ensure I try to expand my knowledge in terms of the administration of the sport because sport is my passion. I didn’t want to be somebody who had to sit down and rely on people,” he said. In 2010, a long-time dream of local track and field icon Dennis Johnson, who was for many years head of sports at UTech, the Bachelor of Science in Sport Science would come to fruition. “So as soon as I heard it was on, I jumped at it,” Francis, who turns 50 in April, said. There were days when Francis, who graduated with a degree in Sports Management, would go to classes on crutches as his prosthetic limb caused soreness. “Each day, I got a little stronger in terms of how to manage my own body. I had years of coaching experience and every sporting event doesn’t need only players, but it also needs strategists who are going to guide or coach the team. So oftentimes I played that role but at no point did I refuse myself from any practical activity because of my disability. I took part in every one of them,” he said. Being a full-time coach and student can be difficult, but Francis said difficulty is relative. “I thought I was blessed. It was simply a thing of managing your time. I have always considered myself a realist. In most situations I prefer to see a bottle as half full rather than half empty, and one of my most dominant philosophies is that no matter how bad a situation you think you are in there are many who are worse and they have survived it, therefore you can too.” Francis works very closely with his brother, and while he is the more celebrated, has nothing but great love and respect for the job his brother is doing. FIRST ATHLETE He was Stephen’s first athlete as he coached him in the discus while he was at Wolmer’s. “I have zero reservation about the kudos and recognition Stephen gets. I am his biggest admirer. He is bright. He is working at his passion and he uses all his available resources to ensure that he keeps improving at what he does. I feel a bit ashamed sometimes when people big me up because I think that he deserves most or all of the praise,” he said. Since graduating, Francis has started his own events planning business and is enthusiastic about his future. “You can either choose to lie down and die or you can choose to get up and live. I chose to live,” he said.last_img read more


Tag: 爱上海同城对对碰验证

first_imgOTTAWA – The scorching heat wave that set records in Ontario and Quebec over the Canada Day long weekend can’t be directly attributed to climate change — but neither can the likelihood of a connection be ignored outright, says a University of Waterloo climate scientist.Suggesting the two aren’t linked would be akin to arguing that no particular home run can be attributed to steroids when a baseball player on a hitting streak is caught doping, said Blair Feltmate, who’s also the head of the Waterloo-based Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation.While a single isolated event might be normal, there’s little doubt that the world and Canada are together seeing more extreme weather events — patterns that can be attributed to climate change, Feltmate said.“All the predictions illustrate that going forward in Canada, things are going to be hotter, wetter and wilder,” he said. “It’s not any particular year that matters. What matters is the overall, the long-term trend.”Globally, the world’s average annual temperature is one degree Celsius warmer than it was a century ago, says Feltmate.“You have to remember that the difference between the temperature we have on the planet today versus an ice age is only five or six degrees Celsius, so being up one degree Celsius over a period of 100 years is a really big deal,” said Feltmate.The Paris climate change agreement Canada signed in 2015 with the rest of the world aims to keep global warming at 2 degrees C compared to pre-industrial levels. 1.5 C would be even better, scientists say. Canada’s current plans to cut emissions are nowhere near sufficient; even if implemented — a prospect that’s in serious doubt — the world will get 3 degrees C hotter than it used to be by the next century.A 2017 study in the journal Nature Climate Change found that about one-third of the world’s population already lives somewhere where the daily temperatures are considered lethal more than 20 days a year.Even with drastic cuts to greenhouse gas emissions in the next 75 years, that number is still expected to grow to 50 per cent of the population — or 75 per cent, including parts of Ontario and Quebec, if nothing is done at all. With limited mitigation, parts of India, Africa and South America would hit lethal temperatures every day of the year.Canadians need to brace themselves for an influx of eco-migrants over the next century, Feltmate warned — people who are fleeing their homelands because they are simply too hot.Environment Canada modelling suggests the average summer temperature across Ontario between 2041 and 2070 will be 3.5 C higher than it was between 1981 and 2010. The city of Toronto has modelling from 2011 that showed between 2000 and 2010 there were on average 20 days over 30 C, and with climate change that will more than triple to 66 days by 2040.Rolf Campbell, a weather historian behind the Twitter account “YOW Weather Records,” says Ottawa hit its highest-ever humidex measurement on Sunday: 47.2 C. Temperatures in Ottawa have gone above 32 C for five days in a row, the longest heat wave since 2001. With the forecast set to hit 35 C on Wednesday, a six-day heat wave would be the longest since 1944.The temperature on Canada Day was 10 C higher than average, leaving paramedics to treat more than 100 people at various Canada Day events. Some 18 people were taken to hospital with heat-related illnesses.Montreal, also experiencing extreme temperatures, reported six deaths this week due to the heat.last_img read more