Corentyne house burglarised

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first_img– gun, ammo, jewellery and cash missingThe police have launched an investigation into a robbery at a Number 6 Village, Corentyne, Berbice home which saw the burglars escaping with a shotgun, 25 rounds of ammunition, a quantity of jewellery and an undisclosed sum of money.Based on information received, the family left their home on Sunday morning for a day of horse racing and upon returning, they found that their home was broken into. The head of the household reportedly told investigators that upon checking the premises, he realised that one shotgun and 25 cartridges were unaccounted for.In addition, a quantity of gold and diamond jewellery and a sum of cash were missing. Investigators are working with the theory that the house was broken into during the day since the family left home in the daylight hours and returned when the sun had already set.The main access door to the house can be seen from the roadway and by persons traversing the area. Guyana Times understands that the house is secured with grillwork and no forced entry was seen. When contacted, B Division Commander Paul Langevine said that he was not briefed on the facts of the robbery.Nevertheless, a source told Guyana Times that several persons were questioned as police continue their investigations. Only on Thursday last, two persons were slapped with seven counts of robbery under arms committed on a Berbice businesswoman.Sylvester Joseph called “Sleepy” and Ashley Bonita Brijpaul appeared before Magistrate Peter Hugh for the offence committed on April 13, 2019.Police, acting on information, led to the arrest of the suspects. Joseph reportedly admitted that he committed the act along with three others.As such, he took the police to his house where he handed over a 400 classic firearm which was hidden under zinc sheets. Prior to that, police ranks went to the Main Street, Cumberland, home of Brijpaul where he was arrested.The two men were not required to plea to the charges committed on Premchand Seelochan, Tarmattie Seelochan, Neil Seelochan, Aditiee Rambudhan, Andre Beerbhajan, Rohan Deonarine and Fiaz Latiff.last_img read more


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first_imgConor Greene and his brother Ryan scored the crucial goals that ensured Tony Boyle’s side have retained their Division One status for next season. Dungloe knew a home win over St Eunan’s would be enough to secure their status for next season, and they deservedly got it in tough conditions against St Eunan’s.Rosses Park was extremely soft due to the recent adverse weather over the last 48 hours, and conditions weren’t ideal for a free flowing game of football. There was also a stiff breeze blowing right across the pitch, but it was the home side that settled the better and two early goals provided a platform that ultimately secured the vital win.Ryan Greene scored from a free, before his brother Conor rifled home to give the home side a dream start.St Eunan’s responded with two scores of their own, but David McGinley’s side were handed a hammer blow when Ryan Greene netted after good build-up play from Dungloe.Both sides exchanged points before half-time, but Dungloe headed for changing rooms six points in the ascendancy on a score-line of 2-03 to 0-03. The second-half followed a similar pattern to that of the first-half, with chances difficult to come about due to the difficult playing conditions.St Eunan’s tried valiantly to get back into the game but couldn’t get the goals they needed to claw Dungloe back.They kicked six second-half points, but Dungloe knocked over five themselves, to run out fairly comfortable winners on a score-line of Dungloe 2-08 St Eunan’s 0-09.A great win for Dungloe, and they can now look forward to their Donegal SFC quarter-final against Malin on September 25th. Greene brothers secure Division One status for Dungloe with win over St Eunan’s was last modified: September 10th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Division OnedungloeGAAnewsSportSt Eunanslast_img read more


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first_img22 April 2016Destroyed in a fire in November 2009, Joburg’s historic Rissik Street Post Office is being restored to its previous glory. The iconic building is one of the city’s heritage sites.“The Rissik Street Post Office building was severely vandalised and damaged by fire, therefore a significant danger exists of further deterioration of this heritage structure,” Helen Botes, the chief executive of Joburg Property Company (JPC), told The Star newspaper.“The frontage has always been Rissik Street but we want to have a more exciting and contemporary-style entrance,” Botes added.It was currently being partially renovated to ensure the structural integrity of the building and to enable interim use while funding was being sought for comprehensive restoration. “Long-term plans include the full restoration of the building and the securing of a long-term public use agreement.” Helen Botes, chief executive of JPC says they want a more contemporary entrance for the Rissik Street post office, currently being refurbished. (Image: Gauteng Film Commission, Brand South Africa)The renovation is estimated to cost R147-million and begins with the excavations for the columns. There’ll also be a structural active scan which includes radar scanning, exposures for the bases and repairs to the core extraction, and the procurement of the required steel, which has been fabricated in line with the designs.The post office’s main hall and north wing will be refurbished for flexible use, while the rest is being finalised. The area will also be made safe and cordoned off to ensure the public cannot enter the building.Long-term, the plan includes a complete heritage restoration, completed in line with heritage guidelines, regulations and public meetings provided by the Gauteng Provincial Heritage Resources Authority.Built in 1897, at one stage the Rissik Street Post Office was Joburg’s tallest building at 102 metres. “It operated until it was vacated by the South African Post Office in 1996. Characterised by its bold mix of architectural styles, the building was proclaimed a national monument in 1978.”Joburgers tweeted their delight at seeing signs of refurbishment:The Rissik Street Post Office Revamp announced! Finally some action!— JHF (@JoburgHeritage) March 3, 2016Great to see a start has been made. Rissik Street Post Office. pic.twitter.com/KoNJeYXy5a— wilsongail (@wilsongail60) February 20, 2016Source: City of Joburglast_img read more


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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The legendary mountain men and frontiersmen of early American history have long been admired for their independence, endurance, and wilderness skills. They are a symbol of freedom and self-reliance. Painter of the Wild West Frederic Remington said that the frontiersman was “untainted by the enfeebling influences of luxury and modern life” and author Washington Irving once said of the mountain man that “with his horse and his rifle, he is independent of the world, and spurns all its restraints.”Through the use of muzzle loading black powder rifles like the ones the frontiersman carried, a contemporary outdoorsman can still find a direct link to this mythic man of the American wilds.A muzzleloader is a firearm in which the projectile (bullet/shot) and the propellant (black powder) are loaded through the muzzle of the gun. A measured amount of gunpowder is first poured into the muzzle, then wadding and the projectile are inserted and packed down with a ramrod. A priming charge is then placed on the priming pan or a percussion cap is placed on the nipple, and the gun is ready to fire. Each time the gun is shot, it must be reloaded in the same manner.Lars Lutton, of Morgan County, is a muzzleloader enthusiast who has been shooting black powder rifles competitively since the early 1980s.“I was interested in muzzleloaders ever since I was a kid, watching Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone parading around with them on the television set,” Lutton said. “I like them because they are accurate, easy to operate, and relatively inexpensive to use. Part of the attraction is shooting old time guns and using old time technology. Flintlocks have been around for 300 years or more and percussion rifles started back in the early 1800s.”Lutton enjoys building his own guns and the personal connection he has with the weapons that he crafts.“Contemporary companies make components that are replicas of the original ones and you can construct almost the entire gun yourself. There are very few working parts and I build from components that I can mix and match. All you need to build a gun is a stock, lock, barrel, and a trigger mechanism. For shooting, everything is by hand. There are no cartridges involved. You have to hand load everything. You can cast your own bullets. The only thing that you have to buy is powder and caps and if you shoot flint, you don’t need caps,” Lutton said. “When Davy Crockett went to the Alamo he brought a flintlock because he knew he could find flint but didn’t know if he would be able to find any caps.”As his previous statements imply, part of what Lutton likes about making and shooting these guns is their simplicity. He also appreciates their deadly accuracy.“The mantra of muzzleloaders is ‘powder, patch, shoot.’ That is how the gun is loaded, simple as that, and if you screw that up and do it in any other order, it doesn’t work out so well,” Lars laughed. “You pour powder down the thing, load the bullet, fire it, and it goes off. These primitive firearms are as accurate as any other contemporary, modern rifle. Today, they have 1,000-yard shooting matches with muzzle loading black powder rifles. A common misconception is that flintlocks are inaccurate and take too long to fire, but if it’s properly tuned and you know your gun well, it is very fast and very accurate.”This sentiment is echoed in Carl P. Russell’s exhaustive book, Firearms, Traps, and Tools of the Mountain Men where he writes, “The touted accuracy of the long rifle is genuine and still demonstrated daily by muzzleloader devotees…the shorter, big bore rifles adopted by the mountain men also are accurate, and the muzzle-loading fraternity of today keeps that fact always before the eyes of the interested public.”Lutton does use these weapons for hunting, but he also takes them to muzzle loading shooting competitions across the state.“I hunt deer during muzzleloader season with old school primitive weapons and I have taken out my 16-gauge flintlock to turkey hunt several times,” Lars said. “When I first started shooting muzzleloaders competitively I would go to what are called ‘Rendezvous,’ which were period correct competitions and gatherings that featured frontier life and culture. They are much like Civil War reenactments. Everyone wore period clothing and lived in period correct accommodations like lodges and teepees. Anything modern had to be covered and hidden from sight. I ended up getting into frontier culture and lore because it allowed me to compete more regularly, but then I found out about these other muzzleloader clubs where you didn’t have to worry about period specific clothing and such. My Rendezvous period didn’t last too long. It was way too much work.”There are primitive weapons clubs across the state that routinely get together to practice, compete, and fraternize that were started several generations ago and whose members may still be the descendants of the club founders. Lutton belongs to one such club.“The one closest to my home that I belong to is Wolf Creek Cap Snappers in Chesterhill. We also shoot at a sister club in Lowell that is called Cat’s Creek Muzzleloading Club. The one in Chesterhill was started by one of the boys’ grandfathers in the early 1950s and most members are multi-generational, dating from the ‘50s. They hauled a building from Chesterhill in a hay wagon several miles down to a property that they own to make the clubhouse. One amusing club anecdote: the founder’s grandson — who shall remain anonymous — was once beaten in a shoot by his own mother with his own rifle,” Lutton said.Muzzleloader shooting competitions are diverse and colorful affairs where the shooting challenges are as unique as the clubs at which they are held.“There are ‘off-hand’ matches which are target shoots where the target is usually 25 yards away. Out at Wolf Creek and Cat’s Creek, targets are set at 30 yards. There’s what is called a ‘woods walk’ where you follow a trail through the woods and shoot at different targets at different distances and different difficulties. At ‘blanket shoots’ everyone brings a prize of a certain denomination that is usually associated with muzzleloading. The best shooters with the best scores get first choice and you choose in descending order, but everyone gets something. Usually the dubious prize keeps showing up competition after competition.”“There are also what are called novelty matches. You go around to different clubs and each has their own novelty matches and challenges. Almost everyone has some that are peculiar to their club and have often been passed down for generations. There’s the ‘outhouse door,’ where you sit on an outhouse toilet seat, call pull, the outhouse door opens and you shoot at some target that can be pretty far away. You only have so much time to draw and shoot before the door closes on you. There is another one called the ‘rattle box’ where you are shooting at small targets at different distances. A rattling timer is placed next to the shooter — a ball bearing is dropped into a vertical maze that eventually comes out of the bottom and hits a bell that times the shooter out. We shoot at crossed strings at 25 yards and try to break both strings with one shot, or shoot at playing cards with the edge facing the shooter, trying to shoot it in half. We shoot all kinds of things — eggs, charcoal, poker chips, lollipops.”Despite the competitive fun and intrigue of muzzle-loading shooting sports and the rich historical legacy embodied by primitive black powder weaponry, interest in them is waning. Lutton knows he may well be a member of a dying breed.“There is a dwindling of interest in the sport and membership numbers in the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association (NMLRA) are down. It’s mostly an age thing. The membership is dying off and there are very few young people taking it up; but that’s true for all shooting sports—they’re in decline, as is hunting in general,” he said.This is an unfortunate truth in our nation, a sign of the disappearing appreciation for that heritage. Author Wallace Stegner once commented that the “wilderness idea” in America is “something that has helped form our character and that has certainly shaped our history as a people…something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed.” And while Stegner is referring to the literal, physical wilderness of our nation, it is equally true that vestiges and artifacts of that wilderness frontier, crucial to the forming of the American democracy, like the black powder muzzle loading rifle, are important to preserve, promote, and celebrate for their great historical and cultural value.last_img read more


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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseThe Ohio AgriBusiness Association Industry Conference always features a diverse and interesting program and this year is certainly no exception. Thursday’s topics included an overview of the state’s livestock industries, a look at global grain markets, and regulations, just to name a few. Among the more popular presentations was the topic of striving for high corn yields with Fred Below from the University of Illinois.“I talked about my seven wonders of the corn yield world. These are the management factors that each impact yield. This is not rocket science. I talked about how important weather is and how weather interacts with nitrogen, about getting the hybrid selection right, managing the rotation, and plant population. The plant population is a big factor that has changed and has to change in order to grow higher yields — narrower rows and more plants. Finally I try to put it together in a systems approach. When you combine management factors they do work together as a team to increase yields,” Below said. “We try to determine the value of each player. I summarized our research over 6 years and we see a common theme. The factors that play the largest role are fertility, narrow-row spacing and plant population. It is all about feeding and managing more plants.”Below said in a favorable year, weather and nitrogen combine to contribute more than 50% of total yield. On average, he has found the maximum response to nitrogen over an unfertilized check plot treatment is approximately 70 bushels per acre.As other management improvements are made, Below said the plant population must increase as well to achieve higher yields. This requires more management, however, and depends heavily upon weather conditions for success.Below also pointed out other factors that can be implemented on farms with a typically big bang for the buck.“One of the things growers could do alone is use fungicide. Some years fungicides have a huge increase in yield,” he said. “We often see the fullest relative maturity for the region gives us the highest yield, especially if they plant early. This is an easy thing to try and it doesn’t cost more.”Stepping up management can have a particularly significant impact in more challenging soil types.“I want to point out that if your soil is more challenging then you have to be a better farmer. Ohio’s farmers are probably better farmers because they have to manage the crops based on the soils they have,” Below said. “Their opportunity to increase yields on a relative basis is actually going to be greater than what we have in Illinois with our soil types.”The Friday program for the OABA event includes consumer relation efforts, equipment hazards and safety, technology updates, herbicide challenges, and edge of field management. Stay tuned for more.last_img read more


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first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now There is nothing you can do about the past. Living there means that you are not living here in the present. Whatever happened in the past is over, and reliving it in your mind changes nothing—except your state of mind.The future isn’t a good place to live either. Worrying about what will be, what will not be, what will happen, and what won’t doe not do anything to change the future. Worrying about the future isn’t useful. That leaves you with only one other option: Now.If you have done something you regret, something that causes you to feel negative emotions, that event occurred in the past. The only reason it changes your state is because you are reliving it and giving it more meaning. Allowing your focus to go there means your focus is not here, that you are not focused on now. Now is the only time where you can make amends for the mistakes you have made in the past, and it is the only time you can forgive yourself, should that be something you need to do.If you want to secure your future from the things you worry about and over which you have some level of control, you can only do the things now that will make a difference when that future arises. Worrying about things over which you have no control is to pull yourself out of the now to some imagined horror that isn’t even real; it is imagined. The only way you can improve your future is by doing something about it today, right now.Effectiveness now requires that you give yourself over to the present moment, refusing to be distracted, and refusing to distract yourself by being somewhere other than where you are right now. Stop reliving the past and do the important work now.last_img read more