Siegfried’s Day of Man helps the homeless

Tag: 夜上海论坛CD

first_imgPeople on campus may see men wearing less clothes than a normal South Bend February day would typically require and holding out Solo cups with a request for money Wednesday. If so, they should not be alarmed — it’s just Siegfried Hall’s signature event, Day of Man, in full force.As it is the 13th year for the event, Siegfried has the basics down for the Day of Man: wear skimpy clothes — most often their bright event t-shirts, shorts and flip-flops — to class and around campus all day and ask for donations that will go to the South Bend Center for the Homeless. Observer file photo According to sophomore Kieran Wurl, one of four event commissioners, the Day of Man first originated when a Siegfried resident forgot his coat one cold winter day, and realized others less fortunate than he dealt with the cold in this fashion every day. “He realized that there are people in the South Bend community that are homeless and go through it every day, fighting the South Bend cold wind. So he gathered a group of his friends, went out and started asking for money for donations for the homeless and then it kind of turned into a Siegfried tradition from then on,” Wurl said. Wurl said members of Siegfried will collect money in-person all day Wednesday, as well as through a Venmo account — @DayOfMan2019. Each section in the dorm will take shifts at both dining halls during high traffic times, and will also be outside of DeBartolo Hall in the morning. While the temperature for this year’s event will be above freezing — around 40 degrees — Wurl hopes it will go down some. “The standard is flip-flops, shorts and a t-shirt, but people can go over or under that … we want to just try to actually put yourself in the shoes of a homeless person to experience what they might be feeling,” Wurl said. Apart from its signature event, Siegfried maintains a relationship with the South Bend Center for the Homeless and tries to help the center and its residents whenever possible. Patrick Davis, a senior commissioner for the event, said a couple dorm members help out at the shelter every weekend, and the dorm has worked with the clothing company Patagonia to donate coats. “It goes beyond just the day itself and more has to do with Siegfried’s relationship with the Center for the Homeless,” Davis said. “We send a couple of kids every weekend to the Center every weekend to help out with whatever they need — cleaning up, organizing clothes, food or just sitting and talking with the residents. … We want people to see another side of South Bend that not many Notre Dame students have seen.”Over the years, Siegfried has raised a combined total of about $130,000 in donations, and $18,000 last year alone. According to Wurl, the hall’s goal for this year is to reach — and potentially break — the $20,000 mark. “We’re just hoping that members of the Notre Dame community will feel generous,” Wurl said. “I know it’s going to be warmer this week than last week,” Davis said. “But I’m sure everyone can remember what it was like to be outside last week, and imagine what it would be like to be stuck outside for longer than a few minutes.” Davis and Wurl mentioned the steps South Bend has taken in the last week in light of the extremely cold weather to open their doors to anyone in need, and touched on the homeless issue the entire country faces. “There’s several hundred people who depend on the Homeless Center. … Kids, women, children and families are depending on the Homeless Center for their meals, and in situations like last week with staying overnight on days where it’s very cold,” Wurl said. “So there’s really a need for it in the South Bend community, but honestly all over the United States it’s also a problem.”Tags: dorm events, philanthropy, Siegfried Hall Day of Man, South Bend Center for the Homelesslast_img read more


Tag: 夜上海论坛CD

first_img“Goal Line Stand” runs Thursdays. If you would like to comment on this story, email Michael at katzml@usc.edu or comment below. The highlight of Saturday’s spring game did not involve football.It wasn’t the touchdown that senior quarterback Matt Barkley threw to sophomore receiver Marqise Lee in the corner of the end zone.It wasn’t the pair of interceptions that senior cornerback Isiah Wiley made either.No, it happened when the Trojans stood around with their helmets off, looking down at the field at a 5-year-old boy wearing a cardinal No. 7 jersey.Corey Marquetti | Daily TrojanBefore the highly anticipated game even began, Barkley, senior safety TJ McDonald and senior punter Kyle Negrete stood around as a boy, who goes by the name McClain, stabbed the field as only true USC Trojans can with a fake sword roughly a quarter the size of Tommy Trojan’s.McClain suffers from a rare blood disease that might ultimately prove fatal, but, looking at the boy on that cool Saturday afternoon, you sure wouldn’t know it. As he ran through Negrete’s legs and playfully tackled him, his       life-threatening illness hardly seemed to matter.McClain was able to get on the field with the help of the Make-a-Wish Foundation, which has made it possible since 1980 for terminally ill children to live out their dreams while they can. The foundation has made these sorts of dreams realities for 250,000 children around the world.For many children, their dream is to be on the field with their favorite professional team or to practice with stars like Jets quarterback Tim Tebow or Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade.McClain’s dream? To lead his favorite team, the USC Trojans, out of the tunnel at the Coliseum.And the players seemed to love it. Barkley was seen smiling on the JumboTron, helping the boy stab the field and helping him do traditional Trojan poses, including the “V” for victory. McDonald was beside Barkley, having fun and carrying McClain around the field. And there was Negrete, who, when tackled, received loud applause from the more than 15,000 fans at the game.Traditionally, a spring game is the chance for a player to prove himself, to make his way up the depth chart, to make an impression on coaches and to excite fans for the season to come.But Saturday was so much more than that for everyone at the Coliseum.We didn’t learn who is going to be Barkley’s backup. We didn’t learn who is going to start opposite junior cornerback Nickell Robey, either.We did, however, learn that football is just a game. It is a game that ends when the final whistle blows and the clock hits zero.Unfortunately, a boy like McClain does not necessarily have the luxury of playing a game. Every day is a fight.And to the delight of fans in attendance, the Trojans took a few minutes out of their hectic day to realize this in the midst of Saturday’s chaos.For fans, the lasting memory of Saturday probably isn’t going to involve football at all. Sure, it is going to involve a football field, but that’s about it.Fans will remember McClain being lifted on the broad shoulders of Barkley and McDonald, who already have the weight of an entire fan base on those shoulders, and of the boy doing his best Tommy Trojan impression.And I don’t think the Trojans would have it any other way.In a game that can be so violent and so time-consuming, it was obvious that when McClain was on the field, the only thing that mattered was McClain getting his chance to have a dream come true. It was a chance to show true emotion and humanity and to give hope for those who need it.And without hesitation, the Trojans obliged.As much as we like to think that our student-athletes train 24 hours a day, seven days a week to prepare for the grueling season that begins in September, these are actual people under the helmets and beneath the shoulder pads.People who realize football is only a part of life, who know that sometimes doing the little things can mean so much to someone so small and that making a sick child’s dream come true is more important than throwing four touchdowns or beating a top-ranked team.Besides, the smile that McClain wore was worth more than any tackle or touchdown could ever prove to be.last_img read more