Higher western bean cutworm feeding may lead to mycotoxins

Tag: 上海的夜生活是什么

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Although western bean cutworm (WBC) flight counts have been relatively stable compared to last year, several growers and extension educators have sent in pictures of western bean cutworm infestations and damage in corn. Obviously it is much too late to do much at this point, as the larvae are either still protected, or more likely, have dropped to the ground to overwinter.  However, the holes and damage that remain could lead to secondary infestations from mold and fungi, and some of these infestations may also be a source for mycotoxins, including fumonisins and deoxynivalenol, AKA vomitoxin.In some cases, damaged kernels will likely be colonized by opportunistic molds, meaning that the mold-causing fungi are just there because they gain easy access to the grain. However, in other cases, damaged ears may be colonized by fungi such as Fusarium, Gibberella and Aspergillus that produce harmful mycotoxins. Some molds that are associated with mycotoxins are easy to detect based on the color of the damaged areas. For instance reddish or pinkish molds are often cause by Gibberella zeae, a fungus know to be associated with several toxins, including vomitoxin. On the other hand, greenish molds may be caused by Aspergillus, which is known to be associated with aflatoxins, but not all green molds are caused by Aspergillus. The same can be said for whitish mold growth, some, but not all are caused by mycotoxin-producing fungi.So, since it is not always easy to tell which mold is associated with which fungus or which fungus produces mycotoxins, the safe thing to do is to avoid feeding moldy grain to livestock. Mycotoxins are harmful to animals – some animals are more sensitive to vomitoxin while others are more sensitive to fumonisins, but it is quite possible that multiple toxins are present in those damaged ears. Mycotoxin-producing fungi are also opportunistic. If you have damaged ears and moldy grain, get it tested for mycotoxins before feeding to livestock, and if you absolutely have to use moldy grain, make sure it does not make up more than the recommended limit for the toxin detected and the animal being fed. This link provides more information on ear molds and mycotoxin contamination:http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/ohiofieldcropdisease/t01_pageview2/Mycotoxin_Sampling_Laboratories_.htmlast_img read more


Tag: 上海的夜生活是什么

first_imgRole of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … chris cameron Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Related Posts center_img Tags:#Apple#mobile#NYT#web When Apple’s iPad hit the shelves just over two months ago, many wondered whether it would become as ubiquitous and as popular as the iPhone and iPod touch. One area many thought would benefit by the iPad was publishing, and some early stats could be a sign that the industry is indeed gaining traction. Wired Magazine and The Financial Times have both seen significant returns on their iPad-based applications, and with some help from Adobe, other publishers will soon find it easy to join in on the fun.Last week, Wired announced that it had sold 24,000 copies of its iPad app within the first day of its release. According to the Epicenter blog, Wired’s one-day sales eclipsed the total sales of the July edition of the Popular Science app, which has sold just 18,000 total apps since launching alongside the iPad back in April. At a $4.99 price tag, Wired’s app has quickly earned publisher Conde Nast nearly $84,000 after Apple’s 30% cut on AppStore purchases.Similarly, the blog Mobile Entertainment reported today the The Financial Times, a London-based newspaper, has sold 130,000 copies of its iPad in the first two weeks. This figure is already more than one-third of the 350,000 iPhone apps the Times has sold since its launch nearly a year ago in July of 2009. The other surprising fact is that the Financial Times’ iPad app has only been on sale in the U.S. and has yet to launch in the U.K. where the paper is published.Is this a clear sign that the iPad has changed the way people think about reading on a mobile device? Is the smaller size of the iPhone screen to blame for poorer sales compared to the iPad? Or is it that iPad novelty has yet to wear off? According to Mobile Entertainment, The Financial Times’ Stephen Pinches estimated that 2010 would be the first year the publication makes more from content than from advertising – a startling revelation in the publishing industry. Publishers that are looking to get in on the action will soon have the process of app creation simplified with new software from Adobe. CNET blog Deep Tech reported today that Adobe plans to make available software that allows publishers to quickly and easily lay out interactive media for the iPad. Working in tandem with the newly released CS5 version of InDesign, publishers can produce interactive multimedia apps using Adobe’s forthcoming software – the same used to create Wired’s popular iPad app.Clearly the iPad is providing a temporary boost to publishers’ sales, but the question remains, will it last? The iPad is still very new and many of these sales can be attributed to the exploratory app hunting many new owners of the device are prone to. Wired and The Financial Times are also a pair of publications that may be suited to selling better on the iPad than others. Fans of geekery and technology, as well as wealthy Wall Street investors – two demographics likely to read the publications – are more likely to own the iPad both because of its price and its status as an early-adopter geek toy.Whether other publications can attain similar results on the iPad has yet to be seen, but it seems clear that many will soon be trying thanks to the iPad’s successful sales. In the first two months, Apple sold 2 million iPads, and those are numbers publishers likely can’t resist. Hopefully with Adobe’s software – or other software, for that matter – publishers will have the ability to make apps at the caliber and with the same sales figures as the early successes from Wired and The Financial Times. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more


Tag: 上海的夜生活是什么

first_imgThe spirit of cooperationIt’s really great stuff! And not only that, but they are sharing this freely with anyone and everyone through their website. They’ve put the Creative Commons license (that’s the CC on the images above) on all of it, so you’re free to use it pretty much how you choose as long as you follow their (light) restrictions:Hammer & Hand’s Best Practices Manual is covered by a Creative Commons license that allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as content is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to Hammer & Hand. If any piece is shared online, it is required to credit Hammer & Hand and include a link to the relevant source page.Sam Hagerman, a co-owner of Hammer & Hand, wrote: “We look forward to our role as participants in the economy of knowledge around all these concepts. Our efforts are offered in the spirit of cooperation, collaboration, and the greater good.”Thank you, Hammer & Hand, for helping us fight the devil in those details! Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. Follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. When I was building a home in 2001, I came up against a gazillion little things that I needed guidance on. I’d never built anything larger than a bookcase, so new home construction was quite a big step.I bought books, scoured the web, and tried to get as much info out of Southface as I could, but I still couldn’t find everything I needed. As a result, I made mistakes because, as you know, the devil is in the details.Builders now have a lot more information available online. Of course, there’s Green Building Advisor. (You’re soaking in it!) If you’re a GBA Pro you get access to a great library of details and more. And it doesn’t take a lot of work for a researching builder to end up at the web site of Building Science Corporation. Lstiburek and company provide a great service to us all by making so much information freely available. Ibacos, another Building America Partner, has likewise put a lot of great info on the web, mostly through the Building America Solution Center.I just learned of a really nice addition to this online resource a couple of weeks ago. Hammer & Hand is a construction company in Portland and Seattle that focuses on high performance buildings, particularly Passive House. I’ve gotten to know several of them from the Passive House conferences I’ve attended over the past few years, and they’re a really impressive group. Zack Semke e-mailed me recently to tell me about their Best Practices Manual.center_img From conditioned crawl spaces to kick-out flashing…The diagram above is from the manual, and it’s from the chapter on one of my favorite topics: crawl spaces. This is their diagram for detailing an encapsulated crawl space in new construction. They also show how to encapsulate a crawl space in an existing home and how to keep the building enclosure at the floor above the crawl space — along with recommending when that’s OK.The manual doesn’t have everything you might look for — yet. They’re still working on it and will release more details as they are developed. The manual is also biased toward their climate. Their recommendation for ventilating an encapsulated crawl space is to put in an exhaust system and ideally to use an HRV. That might work in the Pacific Northwest, where the outdoor air is cool and dry, but it’s not ideal for humid climates. (Yes, I really did say the Northwest is cool and dry. It’s a psychrometrics thing.) If you want more on that topic, I’ve written up a more complete discussion of ways to deal with crawl space air.The chapters in the manual are:FlashingSealant Joints (from which Image #2 below is taken)Windows & DoorsRain ScreensWall PenetrationsRoofsBasementsCrawlspacesDeckslast_img read more