Curry cleared for modified practice after knee injury

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first_imgIn fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding NCR extends Palarong Pambansa reign to 14 years Truck driver killed in Davao del Sur road accident Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Curry will be allowed to take part in modified practices beginning Saturday and increase his on-court rehabilitation. He will be re-evaluated again in one week.The Warriors lead San Antonio 3-0 in their first-round series. If they advance on Sunday, the second round could start as early as April 28.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown LATEST STORIEScenter_img Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames Green group flags ‘overkill’ use of plastic banderitas in Manila Sto. Niño feast MOST READ ‘Stop romanticizing Pinoy resilience’ P16.5-M worth of aid provided for Taal Volcano eruption victims — NDRRMC FILE – In this April 19, 2018 file photo, Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) warms up before Game 3 of the team’s first-round NBA basketball playoff series against the San Antonio Spurs in San Antonio. Curry has been cleared to take part in modified practices but will be out at least one more week with a left knee injury. The Warriors said Curry was examined by the team’s medical staff Friday and is making progress in recovering from the grade 2 left MCL sprain that has sidelined him since March 23.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)OAKLAND, Calif. — Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry has been cleared to take part in modified practices but will be out at least one more week with a left knee injury.The Warriors said Curry was examined by the team’s medical staff Friday and is making progress in recovering from the grade 2 left MCL sprain that has sidelined him since March 23.ADVERTISEMENT Jo Koy draws ire for cutting through Cebu City traffic with ‘wang-wang’ View commentslast_img read more


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first_imgThings have surely improved for women in Liberia. Gone are the days when a woman sits at home all day waiting for her breadwinner to come home while spending those long waiting hours cleaning, cooking, ironing, minding the children climaxed with massaging her spouse’s feet when he finally does arrive.Contrast this scenario to today’s women. They study, raise families, and run organizations. They even drive taxis and motorcycles. In Liberia, they ride motorcycles with a singular objective, and that is to make money, while feeling the wind blow through their hair.Some say they plan on doing it for life.Cairo, Egypt was one of the first countries to begin putting pink colored uniforms on their female drivers, a service marketed as a safe way for women to travel on their own or in rented vehicles. Safety was an issue for Egyptian women and the pink uniforms helped civilians to identify the female drivers and also help look out for them.Liberia has also picked up on the same idea, but with pink helmets and jackets for female motorbike riders, christening them ‘Pink Panthers.” It all started with donations from Henrietta Tolbert of the Angie Brooks International Center for Women Empowerment (whom we have contacted or an interview but still await her response). Since her donations, the Pink Panthers are now able to identify with and be on the lookout for one another, as all motorcyclists do.According to a recent BBC story, tired of being robbed and harassed, Liberian female motorcyclists formed the Pink Panthers collective to make sure that they were easy to spot.David Johnson, a motorcyclist who lost his brother to a motorcycle accident last month, says he has been impressed with the way the women, though only a handful, have come together.“You know, as a woman, you should know your place in terms of knowing how to act and fit in. Sometimes these women try to act like men and can get very aggressive with people. I don’t know, but we are used to seeing women. The President made it easy for everyone to get used to seeing women working, too. But they are so aggressive at times, and that can lead to people wanting to take advantage of them,” Johnson stated.But according to Michael, an arresting motorcycle union officer who runs traffic to make sure that motorcyclists are under control, he sometimes comes across these women. He feels that they are doing a great job by making money from their interest in riding motorcycles.“I like to see women, especially those who look focused and don’t allow anyone to interfere with their purpose out here. With some more training and a little more sensitizing of the public about them being out here, too, they will be okay. Every motorbike rider is robbed and harassed, not just them; though I haven’t seen it. People need to just respect the fact that driving motorcycles for a living is not easy and they should give us a chance for taking the risk that comes with it,” he shared.For now, safety is a prime concern for women considering commercial motorcycling or being taxi drivers, which carry the risks of assault, harassment and theft. What measures can be put in place other than having them wear pink to further protect them?Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more


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first_imgJun 20 2018Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed a portable, non-invasive monitor that can determine, in one minute and without drawing blood, whether chemotherapy patients have a reduced number of white blood cells that could lead to infections.An MIT research team visited a chemotherapy unit as part of a special Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) program designed to identify and solve relatively common, yet significant problems in healthcare settings. They learned that chemotherapy causes a reduction in infection-fighting white blood cells, and about 17% of the time this results in infectious disease, which at worst can result in death and at best causes setbacks in the patient’s chemotherapy regime while the infection gets treated.The research team led by Carlos Castro-Gonzalez, Ph.D., a postdoc in MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics, determined that a device to monitor white blood cell levels at home, following chemotherapy, would allow these patients to easily detect dangerous drops in white cells. This would enable immediate treatment with agents that increase white cell production, and prophylactic antibiotics. They estimated that this approach could prevent about half of the 110,000 infections that occur in chemotherapy patients in the U.S. each year. Their work is described in the journal Scientific Reports.The tabletop prototype device, designed to be used easily at home, takes a video of blood moving through extremely small capillaries at the base of the fingernail just below the skin. The system takes advantage of the fact that white blood cells are much larger than the red cells flowing through capillaries and are almost exactly as wide as the capillary-;about the width of a human hair.The blue light used in the device makes the red cells appear dark and the white cells appear transparent. Because the white cells completely fill the width of the artery as they flow through it, they appear as a white “gap” in the dark flow of red blood cells moving through the capillary. The gaps can be easily counted and any reduction in the normal number of white cells expected to pass through the capillary can be detected in just one minute. In the initial testing of the device the white cells were visually counted by observers, but the research team is currently adding automated computer counting to the system.Related Stories’Google Maps’ for cancer: Image-based model accurately represents blood traffic inside tumorsBlood based test using AI and nanotechnology devised for chronic fatigue syndromeDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this August”This is a simple, yet highly effective technological solution to a common problem in cancer care that will improve cancer treatment at local clinics and at home,” said Tiffani Bailey Lash, Ph.D., director of the NIBIB program for Point of Care Technologies. “It is an excellent example of the NIBIB’s emphasis on point of care technologies that can both reduce healthcare costs and also bring care to remote and underserved communities.”The group tested the device with 11 patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment. One minute of video was recorded while the patients finger was placed in the portable tabletop device. The number of white cells that passed through a single capillary were counted to determine whether chemotherapy treatment had reduced the white cell levels to below the threshold where the risk of infection increases.”Our system proved to be 95 percent accurate in determining whether an individual’s white cell levels were reduced to dangerous levels,” said Castro-Gonzalez. “This was achieved using the counts of our human observers; preliminary results indicate that the automated machine-vision counting system we are developing can improve this level of accuracy.”The team is enthusiastic about the significant improvement in the lives of chemotherapy patients their monitor will provide. They are moving quickly to commercialize the technology by applying for patents and recently launched a company called Leuko, which is working on adaptations of the technology. One goal is achieving more precise white blood cell measurements that could be used to monitor the health of bone marrow recipients. Very precise white cell measurements could also be used to determine exactly when a chemotherapy patient could undergo their next treatment, which would allow for a safely compressed therapy schedule that could translate into more successful treatment and increased survival. Source:https://www.nibib.nih.gov/news-events/newsroom/home-monitor-detects-dangerous-drop-white-blood-cellslast_img read more