ALS Walk to aims to aid and inspire

Tag: 上海外菜乌克兰

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Les McCarthy Members of the Notre Dame community participate in an ALS awareness walk on campus. The walk is sponsored by the Neuroscience Club and the Notre Dame Club of the Mid-Hudson Valley.Sophomore Michelle Lee, Neuroscience Club member, is commissioner for the ALS walk this year.Registration for the event starts at 8:45 a.m. inside the Jordan Hall of Science. After registration, coffee, bagels and muffins will be available prior to a short speech by Kronenberger and co-president of the Mid-Hudson Valley Club Les McCarthy. The group will head out for the walk a little before 9:45 a.m. McCarthy and Kronenberger said registration for the event is $10 and can be completed online prior to the walk or at the event. Event t-shirts were donated by local company CN PATEL and family, and the College of Science is providing refreshments, so the whole $10 will go towards ALS patient support in St. Joseph County. The purpose of the walk is to raise money for local PALS (patients with ALS) and caregivers, McCarthy said. Starting at Jordan, the walk will go “through South Quad, around the lakes and then stop at the grotto for a prayer service where we will read a list of alumni and Notre Dame community members who have had ALS,” Kronenberger said. Holy Cross priest Fr. Robert “Bob” Dowd will lead the prayer service.“We will pray specifically for them, their families and in general for ALS patients and their caregivers,” Kronenberger said.McCarthy and Linda Legault Quinn, class of 1984, co-presidents of the Mid-Hudson Valley Club, have acted as advisors to the Neuroscience Club for the 2018 walk as well as previous ALS walks on campus in 2015 and 2016. The Notre Dame Club of the Mid-Hudson Valley has held a walk, located on the picturesque walkway over the Hudson each year every third Sunday of October since 2009. The walk on Notre Dame’s campus complements the annual walk across the Hudson River. The first walk across the Hudson drew 55 participants. Almost 10 years later, the recent walk on Oct. 21 drew 2,000 participants and a large sum of donations that went towards the ALS Association Greater New York Chapter, McCarthy said. McCarthy was inspired to start the walk after losing three friends to the disease. “When my first friend died twenty-five years ago, I knew nothing about ALS, as many people still don’t know today,” McCarthy said. “I was moved because I saw the effects, but I really didn’t do anything about [it]. I didn’t have the time then that I do today. “Then my former classmate at Cornell died in 2006 of ALS in the prime of his life. And then, in the spring of 2009, Gus Raspitha, ‘70 Ph.D., a club member, died of ALS. And with three strikes, you have to do something. I felt it was a sign that [the walk was] exactly what we should do.”McCarthy said others must understand “the fierce headwinds” PALS and their caregivers go through every day. But ALS still has no cure. Kronenberger, who does cancer research, provided insight into why he believes students should come out to the walk. “One of the things that is unique about our university is the undergraduate research component,” he said. “ALS research is something that some students might be really interested in getting involved in but just have no idea what ALS is or don’t know how to find involvement opportunities.”McCarthy said he was hopeful the walk would be successful. “The real dream would be that we inspire one of these young brilliant minds to run with the ball after finding out firsthand just how devastating this disease is,” he said. The donations page will remain open the week following the walk.Tags: ALS, ALS Walk, Mid-Hudson Valley Club, neuroscience club Notre Dame students, faculty, alumni and community members from the surrounding area will walk to raise awareness and monetary support for ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) in St. Joseph County on Saturday. The walk is sponsored by the Neuroscience Club and the Notre Dame Club of the Mid-Hudson Valley. “ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes the neurons in the central nervous system to break down, and the Neuroscience Club focuses on anything from the brain to all the neurons in your body,”  Neuroscience Club co-president and junior David Kronenberger said.last_img read more


Tag: 上海外菜乌克兰

first_imgDue to these extended hazardous fire conditions, the North Carolina Forest Service issued a ban on all open burning for 32 Western North Carolina counties. The burning ban went into effect on April 3 and will remain in effect until further notice. Firefighters responded to a new wildfire start on Sunday evening near Lake Appalachia Dam in Cherokee County. The Hiwassee River Fire was reported in a steep area near the lake, on both US Forest Service and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) lands. As of this morning, the Hiwassee River Fire is estimated at 80 acres. A helicopter will be used for reconnaissance of the fire area and other support as needed. While the cause of the fire is under investigation, it is suspected to be arson. If you see something, say something. If you know of someone deliberately setting fires, call 911. We are in spring wildfire season, and fire danger is expected to remain high across Western North Carolina this week. Today, firefighters will conduct burn out operations. Burn out operations help to contain the fire by consuming the unburned fuel between the active fire and the control lines. Approximately 14 firefighters from the US Forest Service are on scene today. For more information, visit https://ncforestservice.gov/news_pubs/newsdesk_2020.htm. The US Forest Service urges the public to practice caution as they visit the national forests. Visitors are asked to follow guidance under the burn ban and consider postponing their camping trips. The fire is burning on US Forest Service property on the Nantahala National Forest Tusquitee Ranger District and on TVA lands surrounding Lake Appalachia. Firefighters worked late into the night Sunday to construct containment lines in steep terrain. Photo from Getty Imageslast_img read more


Tag: 上海外菜乌克兰

first_imgEarlier this year when the Jamaican government wanted to extend states of emergency (SOEs) in St. James and other parishes, the main opposition People’s National Party (PNP) did not support the move—and was roundly criticized for their decision. Jamaicans, at home and abroad, were not convinced the respective SOEs had done enough to contain the violent crime wave and wanted them to continue. Indeed, there are those who would have preferred an island-wide SOE.After some four months, the government last week re-imposed the SOE in St. James, and declared new SOEs in the neighboring western parishes of Hanover and Westmoreland—this time, with the support of the PNP. However, as the PNP had previously said, an SOE is only a temporary measure. There has to be a more sustainable, long-term solution to the problem of crime and violence in the island. The spate of criminal activities is ubiquitous in the news media, and Facebook and other social media platforms are inundated with photos and information of missing people, mainly women and young girls. In recent weeks, two girls ages 8 and 11 were sexually assaulted and brutally murdered in their rural districts as they walked—one to school, the other to church. This violence against children is staggering. And, while violent crime is not a new thing in Jamaica, the complete disregard for human life, at this scale, is not normal. Jamaica’s leaders, law enforcement agencies, and citizens have to ask themselves what is causing criminals to target young girls, gun down entire families in their homes, and perpetrate violence against their spouses and even their own children.Is it a new kind of drug? Is it the influx of deportees, many with no means to support themselves? Are people so frustrated by social and economic desperation that their only recourse is becoming involved in the surging illegal drug and gun trade? Our guess is that it is a combination of factors. The real question, however, is what exactly is the government going to do to find meaningful solutions. Jamaica’s crime problem cannot be solved by temporary SOEs, or by deploying more police across the island. We believe it’s a multi-faceted problem that requires a practical, multi-pronged, long-term approach. But first we have to stem the bloodshed. Then, the next step is for the government and law enforcement to meticulously work with the citizenry to develop their trust. A lack of public trust is a major reason that crimes go unsolved, witnesses refuse to come forward, and the cycle of violence continues.Essentially, the residents of communities need to trust and protect each other more; communities need to trust law enforcement; and law enforcement needs to have more trust and confidence in the public officials who administer them. This crippling crime problem will not be solved if there’s an absence of trust prevailing throughout various sectors of the society.Additionally, the Jamaican diaspora must be included in building this public trust. Jamaicans at home must remove any perceived barrier that creates mistrust or suspicion of their compatriots who live overseas.While the diaspora may not be able to provide direct solutions to the crime problem by, for example, providing law enforcement officials, there’s much the diaspora can do indirectly. There’s an abundance of talent and experience among the Jamaican diaspora that can be beneficial in helping Jamaica address the crime problem. However, there’s a serious problem with access to Jamaican authorities.Currently, there are experienced former law enforcement individuals within South Florida attempting to provide specialist training to the Jamaican security forces in the social aspect of crime, but are frustrated by the complete lack of access to the appropriate decision makers in the Jamaican government.Next month, another biennial diaspora conference convenes in Jamaica. It’s emphatically urged that the conference take a serious, pragmatic look at improving accessibility by the diaspora to Jamaica. Much is being lost by this blockade.To reiterate, crime in Jamaica affects Jamaicans everywhere, and the country cannot thrive economically or socially against the backdrop of this scourge. As the nation strives to develop public trust in combating this problem, the input of the diaspora should be sought, and if viable, implemented. If all Jamaicans pool their minds, and their respective resources collaboratively, a solution to this cancerous problem should soon be realized.last_img read more