Month: February 2020

Month: February 2020

first_imgDania Bogle, Senior Gleaner Writer FANS OF athletics may have heard the name Paul Francis as the master strategist behind Jamaica’s gold medal in the women’s 4x400m at the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships in Beijing, last August. Others know him as the younger brother of MVP Track and Field Club head coach, Stephen Francis and one of the club’s founders. Athletes at the University of Technology (UTech) know Francis as head coach of the women’s track team and for four years between 2010 and 2014 their classmate. Francis was 44 years old when he decided to go back to university. He had started in the 1980s at the University of the West Indies and dropped out after a year. He was accepted to do a degree in Business Administration at UTech in 2005 and opted out; but on February 2, 2010, what started out as a minor car accident, would change Francis’ life forever. While travelling on Highway 2000, he had a minor accident and when he left the vehicle to inspect the damage, was hit by a passing car which crushed his right leg. That exacerbated an injury Francis had suffered in 2008. “One day after training, I was fooling around on the track with a football and twisted my ankle and it just …broke. So I was walking around with a noticeable limp from two years before,” Francis told The Gleaner. After three weeks in hospital he was told his leg had developed an infection, and would have to be amputated. Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association president, Dr Warren Blake, one of the island’s most noted orthopaedic surgeons, conducted the operation. “Of course, I would have felt a deep remorse on hearing that I would have had to lose half of one of my legs and like any normal human being, I buss a bawl,” he shared. NO LOOKING BACK “After that bawl, never again have I looked back and regretted or thought that I am disadvantaged because I have a disability.” Francis, an IAAF Level IV certified sprint and hurdles coach, and Area Technical Official, was fitted with a prosthetic leg that August. The amputation made him reevaluate his position. “I did not see myself being able to demonstrate a high knee drill or a start to any athlete, and I thought that would somehow reduce my premium as a coach, and I thought it would be an excellent idea to ensure I try to expand my knowledge in terms of the administration of the sport because sport is my passion. I didn’t want to be somebody who had to sit down and rely on people,” he said. In 2010, a long-time dream of local track and field icon Dennis Johnson, who was for many years head of sports at UTech, the Bachelor of Science in Sport Science would come to fruition. “So as soon as I heard it was on, I jumped at it,” Francis, who turns 50 in April, said. There were days when Francis, who graduated with a degree in Sports Management, would go to classes on crutches as his prosthetic limb caused soreness. “Each day, I got a little stronger in terms of how to manage my own body. I had years of coaching experience and every sporting event doesn’t need only players, but it also needs strategists who are going to guide or coach the team. So oftentimes I played that role but at no point did I refuse myself from any practical activity because of my disability. I took part in every one of them,” he said. Being a full-time coach and student can be difficult, but Francis said difficulty is relative. “I thought I was blessed. It was simply a thing of managing your time. I have always considered myself a realist. In most situations I prefer to see a bottle as half full rather than half empty, and one of my most dominant philosophies is that no matter how bad a situation you think you are in there are many who are worse and they have survived it, therefore you can too.” Francis works very closely with his brother, and while he is the more celebrated, has nothing but great love and respect for the job his brother is doing. FIRST ATHLETE He was Stephen’s first athlete as he coached him in the discus while he was at Wolmer’s. “I have zero reservation about the kudos and recognition Stephen gets. I am his biggest admirer. He is bright. He is working at his passion and he uses all his available resources to ensure that he keeps improving at what he does. I feel a bit ashamed sometimes when people big me up because I think that he deserves most or all of the praise,” he said. Since graduating, Francis has started his own events planning business and is enthusiastic about his future. “You can either choose to lie down and die or you can choose to get up and live. I chose to live,” he said.last_img read more


Month: February 2020

first_img PROBLEMS McLeod has recently run 9.99 seconds for the 100 metres, but Graham doesn’t believe the accelerated velocity will create problems. “All he has to do is fix his leg sometimes by not hitting the hurdle,” he suggested. “Once he’s clean, we’re going to see something fantastic soon, before even Rio”, Graham said, using hurdling terminology to describe a race when the athlete isn’t slowed down by contact with any of the 10 obstacles. More broadly, the experienced coach thinks that McLeod and Parchment could both win medals in the 110-metre hurdles at the Olympics. “Once Parchment gets his start, we could see Jamaica creating history – a quinela,” he predicted. “With Omar’s early speed, once Parchment gets his start, Jamaica is in for some good times in the hurdles,” he concluded. The early-season form of Omar McLeod has one of his former high-school coaches thinking about the world record. Raymond Graham, who coached McLeod in 2013 at Kingston College (KC), says McLeod’s early speed will help chase Aries Merritt’s four-year-old 110-metre hurdles record of 12.80 seconds. Graham also believes that McLeod and Hansle Parchment could make hurdling history for Jamaica at this summer’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Graham isn’t surprised by his former student’s early-season run of 13.08 seconds at the Drake Relays last weekend. “He is the first hurdler I’ve seen with so much speed, and when you have speed,” he explained, “you’re going to run fast”. The long-time coach believes McLeod was unlucky to hit the hurdles in last year’s World Championship final and said: “I think he will break the world record soon.” McLeod ran 12.97 seconds to beat Parchment, the 2012 Olympic bronze medallist, to win last year’s National Senior Championships. However, he struggled in the World Championships final where he placed sixth. Parchment peaked well at the Worlds to be runner-up to Russia’s Sergey Shubenkov. Graham isn’t the first to project world-record potential for McLeod. Just after McLeod’s Nationals wins, 1966 CAC silver medallist Ray Harvey said: “His form is immaculate, impeccable, but his speed is what really, I think, could propel him probably close to the world record.”last_img read more